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    Thank you very much for your help and advice, it has been incredibly useful.
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    (Original post by Fishermea)
    Thank you very much for your help and advice, it has been incredibly useful.
    I'm glad, you are very welcome. Good luck with your AS results.
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    I think this will be my last two questions on this particular thread sir

    Is it worth doing Advanced Placement Exams in say Chemistry, in addition to A Level Chemistry. I'm sure that the A Level would be looked at more - but is there any advantage to doing AP exams in the same subject for which you are doing A Levels in?

    And also would you happen to know what is the general agreed upon favourite book/person is of the Economics tutors at Christ's?

    Thanks for your help sir.

    Have a good day!
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    Hello this thread has been invaluable thanks.

    I'm hoping to apply for Biological Natsci and have taken Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Maths As. I am thinking about dropping Physics for A2, and was wondering if this would put me at any disadvantage.

    Also would being predicted (in the case of dropping physics) A*A*A* over A*A*A give any more consideration to my application or any slight advantage.

    Also how valuable would an EPQ in Genetics be to my application (ie is it worth the time...).

    Thanks in advance
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    (Original post by fnatic NateDestiel)
    I think this will be my last two questions on this particular thread sir

    Is it worth doing Advanced Placement Exams in say Chemistry, in addition to A Level Chemistry. I'm sure that the A Level would be looked at more - but is there any advantage to doing AP exams in the same subject for which you are doing A Levels in?

    And also would you happen to know what is the general agreed upon favourite book/person is of the Economics tutors at Christ's?

    Thanks for your help sir.

    Have a good day!
    It's up to you whether you want to do the AP in Chemistry, it won't help you for Cambridge I don't think as you are doing the A Level but it may help if you want to apply elsewhere, especially to the USA.

    I'm afraid I don't know who their favourite economist is but the best thing is to read widely about the things that interest you in economics as that will prepar you best and allow you to talk more freely than trying to second guess what interviewers will like.
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    (Original post by Kezza97)
    Hello this thread has been invaluable thanks.

    I'm hoping to apply for Biological Natsci and have taken Biology, Chemistry, Physics and Maths As. I am thinking about dropping Physics for A2, and was wondering if this would put me at any disadvantage.

    Also would being predicted (in the case of dropping physics) A*A*A* over A*A*A give any more consideration to my application or any slight advantage.

    Also how valuable would an EPQ in Genetics be to my application (ie is it worth the time...).

    Thanks in advance
    I'm glad it have been useful to you, that's the aim!

    If you know you want to do Bio Nat Sci, then dropping Physics is not a problem. Bio Nat Scis are more likely to do three A2s than Physical Nat Scis, who usually have Maths and FM plus Physics and Chemistry but you don't need Physics for Bio Nat Sci, so if you don't want to do it then you don't need to continue it.

    We do look at predictions, obviously, but we pay more attention to UMS marks as predictions are rarely entirely accurate.

    You sould do the EPQ if you think it is something you will enjoy and do well in. Genetics is clearly relevant for Bio Nat Sci so it will help your preparation for the course. EQs are in general a good thing and to be encouraged if you have something good in mind to do but we dont make them part of our offers.

    I hope this helps.
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    Hi there. Do you have up-to-date statistics on how many lawyers at Christ's College received a first this year (i.e. how many in first year, how many in second year etc.)? I am interested in applying for law. Are you competitive?
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    I recently read that the university admission cap is going to be lifted in 2015/16.
    Is it for this application cycle? If so, do you see this as a good thing? Would more excellent people have an opportunity to study at Cambridge this year?
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    (Original post by cambridgebound)
    Hi there. Do you have up-to-date statistics on how many lawyers at Christ's College received a first this year (i.e. how many in first year, how many in second year etc.)? I am interested in applying for law. Are you competitive?
    Hi there, I don not think it really fair for me to reveal results of current students on a public forum in that way where it may be possible to identify individual students.

    Law is a competitive subject across the university, what I can say is that our lawyers at Christ's over the last five years have averaged 95.10 in their best three UMS, raning from mid to high 80s through to very high 90s. They also averged just over 9 A*s at GCSE.

    I hope this is of some use to you and II'm sorry not to be more precise in the specific question you asked, I hope you understand why.
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    (Original post by AlexKay99)
    I recently read that the university admission cap is going to be lifted in 2015/16.
    Is it for this application cycle? If so, do you see this as a good thing? Would more excellent people have an opportunity to study at Cambridge this year?
    Yes, this was announced by the government in December and applies to the whole university sector in the UK. I do not think, however, that its removal will make much difference at Cambridge. We are not planning to increase our numbers significantly and certainly not as a result of the removal of the cap.

    it is a question of how much provision institutions can offer students. The supervision system is a very time-intensive and expensive method of teaching. It costs us £18,000 a year to educate each undergraduate student, twice what we receive in fees, so we make a loss on every undergraduate we accept. The shortfall is made up through graduate fees and our own reserves. If you just teach people in lectures and they don't write many essays and you don't provide them with accommodation beyond the first year, then you can afford to take on many more students - we aren't in a position to do that I am afraid without compromising the type of experience students will receive.

    Numbers of undergraduates at Cambridge have increased by about 10% in the last fifteen years, from 3,084 acceptance in 1999 to 3,371 in 2013 but have remained steady for the last five years and I don;t see that changing very much in the immediate future.
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    For the natural science course, in the additional personal statement section in the SAQ, am I expected to talk about the course in general or do I have to give specific examples for chemistry/earth sciences (I'm applying for physics everywhere else and haven't done any reading for chemistry/earth sciences, just physics so far)?
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    Cambridge has stated that they don't mind 1 or 2 'bad' modules when applying- is this considered to be anything below 90% UMS or anything below an A (for AS)? I'll be applying for physical natural sciences
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    (Original post by BP_Tranquility)
    For the natural science course, in the additional personal statement section in the SAQ, am I expected to talk about the course in general or do I have to give specific examples for chemistry/earth sciences (I'm applying for physics everywhere else and haven't done any reading for chemistry/earth sciences, just physics so far)?
    You don't need to fill in that section if you don't feel you have anything extra to add to your PS. Lots of people don't and it doesn't do them any harm. If you do, then you can discuss the course and your interest in a broad-based science course, or you can focus on the bits you haven't touched on in the UCAS PS or you can just talk more about Physics. it;s up to you.

    A 'bad' module/s vary from candidate to candidate, what is 'bad' for one candidate might be average for another. What we really mean by that is a module that is out of line with the other module scores - one or two of those is ok, more than that and it gets more tricky.
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    Thank you to everyone for all your questions and kind comments. Good luck to all those waiting for AS and A2 results (or equivalents) over the next three weeks, I hope they bring you the results that you want.

    I will be opening another thread after the A Level results week is over and done with so I will be able to answer more questions then.

    In the meantime, those thinking of applying this year may wish to have a look at these two videos released by the University yesterday about interviews at Cambridge. One is a short one about preparation and the other has some scenes from mock interviews. They may help 'demystify' the process a little.

    Thanks again for the questions.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Yes, this was announced by the government in December and applies to the whole university sector in the UK. I do not think, however, that its removal will make much difference at Cambridge. We are not planning to increase our numbers significantly and certainly not as a result of the removal of the cap.

    it is a question of how much provision institutions can offer students. The supervision system is a very time-intensive and expensive method of teaching. It costs us £18,000 a year to educate each undergraduate student, twice what we receive in fees, so we make a loss on every undergraduate we accept. The shortfall is made up through graduate fees and our own reserves. If you just teach people in lectures and they don't write many essays and you don't provide them with accommodation beyond the first year, then you can afford to take on many more students - we aren't in a position to do that I am afraid without compromising the type of experience students will receive.

    Numbers of undergraduates at Cambridge have increased by about 10% in the last fifteen years, from 3,084 acceptance in 1999 to 3,371 in 2013 but have remained steady for the last five years and I don;t see that changing very much in the immediate future.
    It's very interesting to know this and it is great that the numbers at Cambridge are being planned to increase. It's more understandable that it isn't possible to accommodate everyone because the teaching is quite unique, it's what attracted me to Cambridge, the tutorial system is so personal and it is something that I'm used to coming from a home educated background, although I did go to school I found that the pace and the impersonal way of teaching didn't allow me to learn and to expand upon my interests, I didn't even know that I wanted to go to university until recently. I was used to rote learning which wasn't great but one positive thing would be that it taught me how to manage under pressure.

    Thank you for your reply.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    It's up to you whether you want to do the AP in Chemistry, it won't help you for Cambridge I don't think as you are doing the A Level but it may help if you want to apply elsewhere, especially to the USA.

    I'm afraid I don't know who their favourite economist is but the best thing is to read widely about the things that interest you in economics as that will prepar you best and allow you to talk more freely than trying to second guess what interviewers will like.
    Thank you sir, your advice has been invaluable - I appreciate all your effort that you have taken in responding to me and others.
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    (Original post by Christ's Admissions)
    Hi there, thanks for yourr message. The University is committed to helping students with disabilities of all kinds during application and throughout their time in Cambridge. The Disability Resource Centre (DRC) is dedicated to this and also to helping advise colleges and department about how they can ensure the needs of disabled students are catered for.

    When you apply, there is a form you can fill in to inform us of any disabilities that we need to be aware of both in terms of ensuring that interview arrangements are satisfactory but also to help us contextuallise the appplication.

    We are aware that applicants with Asperger's are more likely to have uneven results and that is something that we can bear in mind when we consider their application.

    The University undertook a big project on Asperger's between 2009 and 2012 to ensure that we are doing all we can to support students with this condition.

    I hope that is helpful in giving you some information.
    Thank you so, so much!!!


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