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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    I'd need at least 20 mins; I'm not that fast. Remember you need to do two papers to get an A*. There's no grade boundary as such for just a non-calc paper on its own.

    I mean most of the algebra I would do in my head. Stuff like completing the square, I would just do it without working out. But I would lose method marks maybe?

    but then again I'm 22.

    I do have a maths degree though, so your story interests me.
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    What modules do you teach in A Level Maths?
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    I try my best to do this. Even when students are extremely rude to me I give them a chance to earn my forgiveness.
    See that's the problem with teachers. They prioritise their favourite students and help them more and leave the others to the side! & you try your best to do this?!?!?
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    Will you do this for me. If a student is misbehaving, tell them as punishment they have to prove the Gauss Markov Theorem. And until they prove it from scratch, they can't go home.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gauss%E...Markov_theorem
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    And considering how much work we do outside of school hours, it's ridiculous.
    If you could earn at least that much (£25k, £300pw after tax) by doing something else with little unpaid time and less stress, would you quit your job?
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    (Original post by inachigeek21)
    Are you intrigued by these questions?
    And, from a teacher's perspective, how do acquire A*s continuously?
    I seriously need to be that student, I'm an B student overall :/
    It's very rare for someone to get A* at the school I teach in! Not sure how much help I could be.

    (Original post by KittyRe-play)
    See that's the problem with teachers. They prioritise their favourite students and help them more and leave the others to the side! & you try your best to do this?!?!?
    I meant I try my best to do this in response to you saying I need to treat students equally.

    (Original post by godd)
    Will you do this for me. If a student is misbehaving, tell them as punishment they have to prove the Gauss Markov Theorem. And until they prove it from scratch, they can't go home.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gauss%E...Markov_theorem
    I wish! Students can always just walk out these days with no consequence. Detentions etc. are pointless because students never bother to attend unless they're the teacher's pet type.
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    (Original post by godd)
    What modules do you teach in A Level Maths?
    Core 1 only so far.

    (Original post by thisistheend)
    If you could earn at least that much (£25k, £300pw after tax) by doing something else with little unpaid time and less stress, would you quit your job?
    Not right now. As much as I hate my job, I still love for those few wonderful moments that you get. I really enjoy working with teenagers.

    I imagine in time I will leave though.
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    Do you need a masters to become a teacher?

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    (Original post by chantheman)
    Do you need a masters to become a teacher?

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    No. A PGCE (which is a postgrad course) is the only requirement.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    No. A PGCE (which is a postgrad course) is the only requirement.
    Do you need more experience to teach at a college or 6th form level?

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    (Original post by chantheman)
    Do you need more experience to teach at a college or 6th form level?

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    Not sure about college to be honest but 6th form doesn't require any more experience than a normal secondary teacher.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    Not right now. As much as I hate my job, I still love for those few wonderful moments that you get. I really enjoy working with teenagers.

    I imagine in time I will leave though.
    lol, so you hate your job. don't hear that one mentioned in the staff room heh

    I'm a supply teacher myself and if the class is nice enough and you don't have to properly teach them (ie the teacher left an exam booklet), you just sort of chat to the kids, do some ad-hoc boardwork and its a good lesson.
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    (Original post by thisistheend)
    lol, so you hate your job. don't hear that one mentioned in the staff room heh

    I'm a supply teacher myself and if the class is nice enough and you don't have to properly teach them (ie the teacher left an exam booklet), you just sort of chat to the kids, do some ad-hoc boardwork and its a good lesson.
    I don't envy you in your job. Your behaviour management must be of a high level.
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    Is it EVER okay for you and your colleague (assuming both of you teach in the same department) to scream in a students face that they will not be able to do any better then a 'C' grade at GCSE? Mostly wrote that at out of spite and only slight curiosity...my teachers seemed to have thought that kind of approach was okay! who got the A now...?:cool:
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    (Original post by rosebud114)
    Is it EVER okay for you and your colleague (assuming both of you teach in the same department) to scream in a students face that they will not be able to do any better then a 'C' grade at GCSE? Mostly wrote that at out of spite and only slight curiosity...my teachers seemed to have thought that kind of approach was okay! who got the A now...?:cool:
    I would be genuinely ashamed of myself if I ever raised my voice towards a student.
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    What grades/subjects did you get/do in your GCSE's, A-levels and Degree?

    Are you enjoying teaching?


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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    I would be genuinely ashamed of myself if I ever raised my voice towards a student.
    Well then, where were you on my time table? :hand: but in all seriousness that is really refreshing to hear! It can be extremely emotionally draining being told your not good enough for anyone, let alone a student.
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    (Original post by Autistic Merit)
    I don't envy you in your job. Your behaviour management must be of a high level.
    That's a funny one actually. It doesn't actually matter... at least on short term supply.

    If a class is horrific, more likely than not, the HoD or someone else would say "oh they're bad for all the supplies" or more worryingly "they're bad for permanents too". If a class is good, then you do very little. If a class is average, then you just muddle through. I find on short term, schools are less concerned with how they behaved in your class and more concerned that you report everything.

    I can't actually be "blamed" for anything, (ok, I accidentally shot a student once with a staple gun, that blame was squarely on me ). But I am responsible and try my best, schools invite me back, enough children smile at me, so I assume I'm doing alright.

    On longer term, schools do care about behaviour and good schools will try and support you, as I found during a 2 month booking, behaviour got better, school was also pleased with progress. Since I do not usually do long-term and have no intention of ever doing NQT and going permanent, I don't know how behaviour pans out over a year of you teaching a class solo.
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    What would you do if a student who was normally well behaved and polite started acting up, not doing homework, and seeming out of sorts or even miserable? Would you be lenient, at least at first? Or treat them the same as a "serial offender"?
    In relation to that, do you find you quickly form judgements about pupils and their behaviour, and how does that affect how you treat them? Do you find it easy to "turn over a new leaf" every day?
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    1. I know you previously said that you do throw in easy questions for the shy ones, but do you accept that there are those few with social anxiety and them speaking infront of the class is like asking a kid with a broken leg to run a mile?

    2. Do you think that a person who got a B in GCSE Maths could get a B/A at A-Level, provided that they worked hard obviously?

    3. You said earlier you would date a fellow teacher, if you both worked in the same school would you say that you are seeing each other/dating?

    EDIT: Also this is officially my favourite AMA
 
 
 
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