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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Again if I have a 2.1 degree in CS from an ivy, how are my skills transferable to this job?

    Do you even know how socially awkward these guys are, the whole stereotype of a nerd exists for a reason.
    Plenty it shows you ability to comprehend large amounts of information, identify opportunities and gaps in the implementation of key priorities and proactively seek creative solutions to resolve issues. This is from your degree, because at an IVY you would be doing this day in day out. Ability to speak Spanish, you learn that because its taught in high school, like compulsory.

    Experience on working on large complex projects as part of a team - done in CS
    Experience of delivering business change projects as part of a team - done in CS
    Ability to scope projects and a track record of good project delivery - done in CS
    Experience of working cross-functionally and influencing delivery - done in CS
    Experience of working with external consultants desirable but not essential - done in CS
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    That is people skills.

    You don't spent 4 years at uni doing a degree in people skills, you study abstract topics.
    You learn people skills, before i was **** scared to do presentations and had no concept of actually do a full of presentation to a decent standard. Just full of rambles, now I've got really good with learning! Also sharing thoughts and ideas with people, debating/discussion……should i go on….use your imagination. Depends on the person, if you sat at home watching "Eastenders" ofc your experiences be different to mine.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Plenty it shows you ability to comprehend large amounts of information, identify opportunities and gaps in the implementation of key priorities and proactively seek creative solutions to resolve issues. This is from your degree, because at an IVY you would be doing this day in day out. Ability to speak Spanish, you learn that because its taught in high school, like compulsory.

    Experience on working on large complex projects as part of a team - done in CS
    Experience of delivering business change projects as part of a team - done in CS
    Ability to scope projects and a track record of good project delivery - done in CS
    Experience of working cross-functionally and influencing delivery - done in CS
    Experience of working with external consultants desirable but not essential - done in CS
    Standard in sales across the board.

    Point is you emphasise people skills, and is critical for closing deals, that is not academic and you do not learn that on a CS degree - I have a CS degree you know?
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Rest assure, they don't teach you that in a CS degree at Imperial.

    That is my point, people skills is not academia.
    Depends on the individual, but the vast majority of Imperial grads end up in high end places, says it all.
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    (Original post by MUN123)
    I graduated last month with a 2:2 in Computer science and since then I have been applying for graduate jobs non-stop with a lot of rejections. I then had to sign on JSA, now the Job center are advising me to work for free for 2 weeks in a call center to get "experience" which I've refused because I dislike to be exploited by the company and work for free in a field that does not interest me.

    I explained to the Job centers that I'm interested in IT jobs to which they replied that they would not be paying me benefits so that I could sit and wait for a very specific job. And after applying to loads of minimum wage jobs and getting loads of rejections they want me to work for free in some crappy job to get experience.

    The other day they sent me to a compulsory course which explained about how to use the internet to apply for jobs I thought it was laughable they must be stuck in the 90's. They have no clue on how to deal with graduates
    2 weeks is a walk in the park mate, I'd take it. They're trying to make my mate work in a supermarket for 8, when he's busting his ass 40 hours a week looking for jobs and already has 2 years of supermarket experience...

    (In case anyone doesn't realise, this is how a government tries to artificially push down unemployment statistics)
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Standard in sales across the board.

    Point is you emphasise people skills, that is not academic and you do not learn that on a CS degree - I have a CS degree you know?
    People skills are environment, "ordering milky chai" at starbuck or sitting at a table eating "jalebis" is a sociable thing to do. It depends on the level on conversation you choose to have, if your talking to a cabbage then they won't develop.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Depends on the individual, but the vast majority of Imperial grads end up in high end places, says it all.
    Well when there is a bias towards people with x amount of UCAS points etc what do you expect?

    How do you know for sure someone from a lesser uni won't be able to do their jobs competently if they don't even get a look in?
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Well when there is a bias towards people with x amount of UCAS points etc what do you expect?
    Then you need to blame the person that influence the lack of it. In the real world decision makers and influencers are held accountable for bad decision making. Like if a company makes a loss the directors face the consequence. So bad parents should be held accountable? Because some parents like to go out and drink and do powder till they are blue in the face. I believe in responsibility and accountability.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    People skills are environment, "ordering milky chai" at starbuck or sitting at a table eating "jalebis" is a sociable thing to do. It depends on the level on conversation you choose to have, if your talking to a cabbage then they won't develop.
    Point is your actual job is not academically taxing.

    If you was a professor at a uni, then fair enough. But you just sell **** and do a bit of project management.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Then you need to blame the person that influence the lack of it. In the real world decision makers and influencers are held accountable for bad decision making. Like if a company makes a loss the directors face the consequence. So bad parents should be held accountable? Because some parents like to go out and drink and do powder till they are blue in the face. I believe in responsibility and accountability.
    I have accepted it,and just make the most out of what I have got.
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Plenty it shows you ability to comprehend large amounts of information, identify opportunities and gaps in the implementation of key priorities and proactively seek creative solutions to resolve issues. This is from your degree, because at an IVY you would be doing this day in day out. Ability to speak Spanish, you learn that because its taught in high school, like compulsory.

    Experience on working on large complex projects as part of a team - done in CS
    Experience of delivering business change projects as part of a team - done in CS
    Ability to scope projects and a track record of good project delivery - done in CS
    Experience of working cross-functionally and influencing delivery - done in CS
    Experience of working with external consultants desirable but not essential - done in CS
    That's funny because CS graduates have one of the highest rates of unemployment among graduates. MadVlad recently wrote how useless CS degrees are in the sense that they lack a practical approach and are extremely theoretical. Some Google searches seems to back this up with anecdotal evidence of CS graduates not being able to write relatively simple algorithms or being Jack of many trades yet master of none.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Point is your actual job is not academically taxing.

    If you was a professor at a uni, then fair enough. But you just sell **** and do a bit of project management.
    Im in luxury tourism…. to get IBM qualifications be useless to my company. But you still get the same accreditations as you would if you were a developer as a sales person working in IT, for example. IBM they would give u the same training an accreditation…… who is to blame… the head of IBM for deciding upon educating his salesforce?
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    (Original post by SloaneRanger)
    Im in luxury tourism…. to get IBM qualifications be useless to my company. But you still get the same accreditations as you would if you were a developer as a sales person working in IT, for example. IBM they would give u the same training an accreditation…… who is to blame… the head of IBM for deciding upon educating his salesforce?
    Yeah industrial qualifications.

    If I wanted to do my prince 2 , they don't give a **** what uni you studied at.
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    (Original post by Tom_Ford)
    People with 2.2's don't deserve jobs. Getting a 2.1 is not exactly difficult.
    Harsh Im sure some people may have had extenuating circumstances and so on
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    That's funny because CS graduates have one of the highest rates of unemployment among graduates. MadVlad recently wrote how useless CS degrees are in the sense that they lack a practical approach and are extremely theoretical. Some Google searches seems to back this up with anecdotal evidence of CS graduates not being able to write relatively simple algorithms or being Jack of many trades yet master of none.
    You can write whatever you want on a CV, always look at the job spec and copy and paste then edit. You can easily merge a particular role they are looking for and find traits that would be deemed similar and transferable. Fathobbit works for his uncle, he wouldn't receive training or exposure to the real world. Im having to give life coaching in this thread every comment he says I'm having to find links from corps in his field and I've never worked for a company like IBM. He is better off asking someone who has.
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    (Original post by somethingunique)
    Harsh Im sure some people may have had extenuating circumstances and so on
    They don't believe in giving people second chances mate.

    I think it's probably because they are threatened by increased competition by doing so.
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    They don't believe in giving people second chances mate.

    I think it's probably because they are threatened by increased competition by doing so.
    But I mean is it really fair to say ''people with 2:2s dont deserve a job''?
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    (Original post by fat_hobbit)
    Yeah industrial qualifications.

    If I wanted to do my prince 2 , they don't give a **** what uni you studied at.
    I can go to my director and he would give me a few days off a week to do it. All I would have to do is send him an email and he would authorise me to bang the company credit card over it or get HR to do it. Whats your point, when your in certain companies, if i could justify money spent on prostitutes to entertaining a client, he would agree. OFC I would have to make sure it didn't get brought up with HR, but again companies are like that. Atm your uncle wouldn't fund it, personally i would rough him up to get it done.
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    OP which university did you attend
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    (Original post by Juichiro)
    That's funny because CS graduates have one of the highest rates of unemployment among graduates. MadVlad recently wrote how useless CS degrees are in the sense that they lack a practical approach and are extremely theoretical. Some Google searches seems to back this up with anecdotal evidence of CS graduates not being able to write relatively simple algorithms or being Jack of many trades yet master of none.
    Mad Vlad is right.

    And the higher you go up the league tables, the more theoretical the courses are.

    I know at Edinburgh, students spend a lot more time doing math, rather than actually programming. That was the common complaint those who transferred from Edinburgh to Aberdeen had.

    So when these students go out into the commercial environment they have gaps in their knowledge. And very often, instead of making lives easier for themselves, by using frameworks, 3rd party API, they try and create everything from scratch. There is an art to software engineering, which you only truly appreciate ONCE you work in industry and work on a commercial app
 
 
 
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