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    On their website Southampton talk about a clinical apprenticeship, can anyone explain what exactly that is? Thanks
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    (Original post by Joshi213)
    So you're going to come out with the BMBS definitely with either a BMedSci or MMedSci? But you can also go to a different uni altogether and get a BSc? What's the process to do that?

    Thanks for clearing this up though!
    Yes. If you want to go elsewhere there is an approval thing where you have to be performing well and find another university to take you for the last year of one of their BSc degrees. As I am not doing it I don't know much of the knitty gritty but its one of those things that will probably change by the time you get to that stage anyway.

    (Original post by rachel479)
    Can I just confirm that Southampton is a non-PBL uni? They don't mention it on their website so I assume they don't do it...
    Non PBL. Not even a little bit. Bleugh.

    (Original post by dana.low)
    On their website Southampton talk about a clinical apprenticeship, can anyone explain what exactly that is? Thanks
    I assume this is where in year 2 you get trained to work as a healthcare assistant in the hospital. You then do a variety of shifts and get to see the running of the place as well as practice your clinical skills :yes:
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    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    I assume this is where in year 2 you get trained to work as a healthcare assistant in the hospital. You then do a variety of shifts and get to see the running of the place as well as practice your clinical skills :yes:
    Thanks!
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    (Original post by Joshi213)
    Right okay thanks!




    Does anyone know roughly how long it'll take for them to get back to us after the interview? Hopefully it's not up until March like loads of others...
    It won't be until they're pretty much done with interviews. March onwards really :sadnod:
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    (Original post by Joshi213)
    Ah what that sucks
    Just try to forget about it. :yes:.
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    Does anyone know if they place more importance on the interview than the group task or vice versa?
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    Its hard to excel at the group task in my opinion, given the time frame and it's nature. If you focus on not standing out for a bad reason in the group task and try to nail the panel interview you should be fine. At least thats how I approached it haha.
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    (Original post by Anon12345678)
    Does anyone know if they place more importance on the interview than the group task or vice versa?

    As far as I know after both, they simply tick a box that says "suitable" or "unsuitable", so they're equally weighted. I don't know how this information is used (ie do you need 2 suitables or is 1 enough) but that is the basics of it.
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    Just had an email from soton asking what I was doing 2011-2012.

    I was accepted at uni and then became Ill and had to take a year out. Will this stand against me?
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    Got a rearranged interview for 10th Feb, with the overseas gang 😄


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    I thought I had the 'intergrated' system understood.. but not i'm not too sure

    So you learn about the disease/anatomy/mechanism in lectures
    then go to a hospital to look at patients who are affected by what you just learnt
    then you learn about other diseases
    and come back to learn more about the first disease?
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    (Original post by Grad1202)
    Just had an email from soton asking what I was doing 2011-2012.

    I was accepted at uni and then became Ill and had to take a year out. Will this stand against me?
    Shouldn't do :nah:. They're just checking everything.


    (Original post by Cutie_Pie)
    I thought I had the 'intergrated' system understood.. but not i'm not too sure

    So you learn about the disease/anatomy/mechanism in lectures
    then go to a hospital to look at patients who are affected by what you just learnt
    then you learn about other diseases
    and come back to learn more about the first disease?

    Not quite.

    The easiest way to explain is to compare it to traditional. So "traditional" courses will teach you all the anatomy of the body. Then they will teach you all the physiology of the body. Then they will teach you all the embryology of the body. This is not how we do it.

    We are "integrated". So we learn in systems. Respiratory system, renal system, nervous system, gastrointestinal system....
    When you're learning the respiratory system for example, you'll learn all the respiratory anatomy, physiology, embryology, pharmacology, and the diseases of that system. When you learn the reproductive system, it's the same. Anatomy, physiology, physiology, pathology, etc etc.

    We have a "spiral curriculum" so during semester 2 (year 1) for example, you do "RCR" which is resp, renal, cardio. But you only do the chronic conditions, like cancer, COPD, kidney failure etc etc.
    In semester 3 (year 2) you do RCR again. When you revisit it you revise the anatomy and physiology and then learn the acute conditions - infection, MI, acute kidney injury etc. This way, you don't start clinical placements in a situation where you haven't revised the heart for 2 years.

    Year 1 semester 1: Foundations of medicine (the basics) and Nervous and locomotor 1 (nerves and movement)
    Year 1 semester 2: Resp, Cardio, Renal 1.
    Year 2 semester 3: Resp, cardio, renal 2, and nervous and locomotor 2 (the brain)
    Year 2 semester 4: Gastrointestinal and endrocrine&life cycle

    With regards to the hospital placements, they don't match up to the lectures very well, but they do match up a little.

    Clinical placements:


    Year 1 - Every other Thursday afternoon: You learn how to take a history. Initially this is of pain as in semester 1 you do the nervous system as it functions for movement and pain. But as you start to do RCR you can start doing heart and lung histories too but this isn't exclusive. It isn't in a hospital, it is in a GP surgery and often we have simulated patients which are actors who pretend to be patients. Some times the GP gets real patients in too.

    Year 2 - You alternate one week in a GP and one week in hospital every monday afternoon: This is where you learn to do physical examinations. There are about 10 to learn and you do them both in the hospital and in the GP surgery. Often in the surgery you practice on each other and in the hospital you practice on patients or simulated patients. This will again, try to follow the lectures but doesn't always work that way. When you start semester 3 (year 2) you start with RCR 2 and neuro 2, so the first few weeks will follow along, but then you need to learn to do examinations that don't fit with a semester exactly, like blood pressures or hip examination. so it doesn't always match up.

    Year 2 you also work as a healthcare assistant, but this may only be on one type of ward.

    So when you say "go to the hospital and look at patients who are affected by what you learnt" - that's not really true.

    When you start your full time clinical placements in 3rd year you'll rotate around all the specialities and get a chance to see everything you've learn in year 1 and 2 in reality. `




    Does that make sense?
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    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    As far as I know after both, they simply tick a box that says "suitable" or "unsuitable", so they're equally weighted. I don't know how this information is used (ie do you need 2 suitables or is 1 enough) but that is the basics of it.

    Just wanted to make sure that there is no written task during the selection day ? (as someone wrote this on a different post!!)

    thanks
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    (Original post by yelrihsuday)
    Just wanted to make sure that there is no written task during the selection day ? (as someone wrote this on a different post!!)

    thanks
    They considered it when they bought interviews in, which is why it is often talked about but no. There is no written component.
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    (Original post by Neostigmine)

    Not quite.

    The easiest way to explain is to compare it to traditional. So "traditional" courses will teach you all the anatomy of the body. Then they will teach you all the physiology of the body. Then they will teach you all the embryology of the body. This is not how we do it.

    We are "integrated". So we learn in systems. Respiratory system, renal system, nervous system, gastrointestinal system....
    When you're learning the respiratory system for example, you'll learn all the respiratory anatomy, physiology, embryology, pharmacology, and the diseases of that system. When you learn the reproductive system, it's the same. Anatomy, physiology, physiology, pathology, etc etc.

    We have a "spiral curriculum" so during semester 2 (year 1) for example, you do "RCR" which is resp, renal, cardio. But you only do the chronic conditions, like cancer, COPD, kidney failure etc etc.
    In semester 3 (year 2) you do RCR again. When you revisit it you revise the anatomy and physiology and then learn the acute conditions - infection, MI, acute kidney injury etc. This way, you don't start clinical placements in a situation where you haven't revised the heart for 2 years.

    Year 1 semester 1: Foundations of medicine (the basics) and Nervous and locomotor 1 (nerves and movement)
    Year 1 semester 2: Resp, Cardio, Renal 1.
    Year 2 semester 3: Resp, cardio, renal 2, and nervous and locomotor 2 (the brain)
    Year 2 semester 4: Gastrointestinal and endrocrine&life cycle

    With regards to the hospital placements, they don't match up to the lectures very well, but they do match up a little.

    Clinical placements:


    Year 1 - Every other Thursday afternoon: You learn how to take a history. Initially this is of pain as in semester 1 you do the nervous system as it functions for movement and pain. But as you start to do RCR you can start doing heart and lung histories too but this isn't exclusive. It isn't in a hospital, it is in a GP surgery and often we have simulated patients which are actors who pretend to be patients. Some times the GP gets real patients in too.

    Year 2 - You alternate one week in a GP and one week in hospital every monday afternoon: This is where you learn to do physical examinations. There are about 10 to learn and you do them both in the hospital and in the GP surgery. Often in the surgery you practice on each other and in the hospital you practice on patients or simulated patients. This will again, try to follow the lectures but doesn't always work that way. When you start semester 3 (year 2) you start with RCR 2 and neuro 2, so the first few weeks will follow along, but then you need to learn to do examinations that don't fit with a semester exactly, like blood pressures or hip examination. so it doesn't always match up.

    Year 2 you also work as a healthcare assistant, but this may only be on one type of ward.

    So when you say "go to the hospital and look at patients who are affected by what you learnt" - that's not really true.

    When you start your clinical placements you'll rotate around all the specialities and get a chance to see everything you've learn in year 1 and 2 in reality. `




    Does that make sense?

    wow. this is so helpful!
    Thank you - you are amazing!!
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    (Original post by Cutie_Pie)
    wow. this is so helpful!
    Thank you - you are amazing!!
    Any time!

    None of this is ever made particularly clear so I am always more than happy to clear it up. When I applied it was sort of "blind" in that I didn't really know much about what I was getting into. It's only through living it that I know!
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    (Original post by Neostigmine)
    They considered it when they bought interviews in, which is why it is often talked about but no. There is no written component.
    Great !

    Thanks
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    Any graduates heard for interviews? I know the date is the 24th so we would be hearing from them this week or early next week if we do get selected?
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    (Original post by Fuhad25)
    Any graduates heard for interviews? I know the date is the 24th so we would be hearing from them this week or early next week if we do get selected?
    I'm a grad and got an email last week asking to clarify what did for gap year so I think it might be soon
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    (Original post by Fuhad25)
    Any graduates heard for interviews? I know the date is the 24th so we would be hearing from them this week or early next week if we do get selected?
    I'm a grad and my interview is on the 13th..not sure why maybe they decided to interview more grads than before?
 
 
 
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