Edexcel A2 C3 Mathematics 12th June 2015 Watch

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hex-666-triene
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#361
d/dx lnx = 1/x

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hex-666-triene
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#362
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I am resitting c3

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frozo123
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#363
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About to do the June 2014 for a mock
Wish me luck

EDIT: Holy **** got 44/75.. Woopsies..
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hex-666-triene
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#364
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(Original post by frozo123)
About to do the June 2014 for a mock
Wish me luck
Thats the paper i did bro

I can give you the answers if you want.. You can cheat :yes:

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Mary562
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#365
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(Original post by hex-666-triene)
Thats the paper i did bro

I can give you the answers if you want.. You can cheat :yes:

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The answers are online
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hex-666-triene
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(Original post by Mary562)
The answers are online
Yes you are right, sister maryam

How are you finding c3?

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physicsmaths
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(Original post by Ripper Phoenix)
you can but thats wrong id say. You only use radians when you have a sin or cosine in the question, we have been taught this thats why i know haha
No this is wrong. default is radians as when working with sin and cos and functions of x without trig radians must be used as radians is a measure of arc length on the cartesian plane. Degrees is just relative to one rotation or unit circles and cant be linked to other lines such as y=x or whatever if you get what I am saying. If an equation is yx-sinxtanx then because we are dealing trig and x n y's so we use radians here.


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Mary562
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#368
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(Original post by hex-666-triene)
Yes you are right, sister maryam

How are you finding c3?

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It's going pretty well (just doing past papers), focusing on Core 4 atm


And yourself?
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physicsmaths
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#369
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(Original post by hex-666-triene)
d/dx lnx = 1/x

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This might be tru you know.


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hex-666-triene
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(Original post by Mary562)
It's going pretty well (just doing past papers), focusing on Core 4 atm


And yourself?
Masha'allah, sister. Keep it up

C4 is a bit of a pain, yeah

But just as long as you can nail the integration, you'll have like a C in C4 already... Theres just so much integration :lolwut:

I havent really started c3 yet, but i am nailing c1/c2 now :smug:

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Mary562
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(Original post by hex-666-triene)
Masha'allah, sister. Keep it up

C4 is a bit of a pain, yeah

But just as long as you can nail the integration, you'll have like a C in C4 already... Theres just so much integration :lolwut:

I havent really started c3 yet, but i am nailing c1/c2 now :smug:

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Lol

Yes true indeed - Integration stills needs mastering

Lol are you doing them again - I'm repeating S1.
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lam12
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#372
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(Original post by physicsmaths)
No this is wrong. default is radians as when working with sin and cos and functions of x without trig radians must be used as radians is a measure of arc length on the cartesian plane. Degrees is just relative to one rotation or unit circles and cant be linked to other lines such as y=x or whatever if you get what I am saying. If an equation is yx-sinxtanx then because we are dealing trig and x n y's so we use radians here.


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Err can you explain this more simple please, I'm confused now (sorry)


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Ripper Phoenix
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#373
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(Original post by physicsmaths)
No this is wrong. default is radians as when working with sin and cos and functions of x without trig radians must be used as radians is a measure of arc length on the cartesian plane. Degrees is just relative to one rotation or unit circles and cant be linked to other lines such as y=x or whatever if you get what I am saying. If an equation is yx-sinxtanx then because we are dealing trig and x n y's so we use radians here.


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Yeah but in simple english if you have sin cos or tan or sec or cosec or anything TRIG! then you use radians
otherwise if the question has none of the above and simple x without trig its Normal DEGREES without changing to radians. Trust me this is super accurate and im sure we are on the same page talking about the same thing but i'm being more simple.
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frozo123
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#374
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Someone explain to me how to find range and domain of any graph? eg g(x)= x+2/x-1
what's the range of that?
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Emma!95
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#375
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(Original post by Ripper Phoenix)
Yeah but in simple english if you have sin cos or tan or sec or cosec or anything TRIG! then you use radians
otherwise if the question has none of the above and simple x without trig its Normal DEGREES without changing to radians. Trust me this is super accurate and im sure we are on the same page talking about the same thing but i'm being more simple.
Yes you're definitely right it works the way you said. In the Jan 2007 Q6d it just tells you to find X1, X2.. I looked in the question if any Trig was mentioned, and it didn't so just found the iterative in degrees and got the right answer. So definitely shouldn't use radians in 'default' form. What you said defo works. Thanks again :thumbsup:
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Kill3er
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#376
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#376
(Original post by Ripper Phoenix)
Yeah but in simple english if you have sin cos or tan or sec or cosec or anything TRIG! then you use radians
otherwise if the question has none of the above and simple x without trig its Normal DEGREES without changing to radians. Trust me this is super accurate and im sure we are on the same page talking about the same thing but i'm being more simple.

This is correct.
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rayquaza17
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#377
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I haven't followed everything that's been said, but:

If there are sines and cosines (or other trig functions) involved and it doesn't say to use degrees, then use radians.

If there's no sines and cosines, then it makes no difference what you use.
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Viggi
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#378
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I'm just going over C3 at the moment. Any tips? (Good to know that integration is so important for C4!)
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physicsmaths
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(Original post by Viggi)
I'm just going over C3 at the moment. Any tips? (Good to know that integration is so important for C4!)
If you get really stuck in proving a trig identity change everything to sin and cos. I have found this advice has helped all my friends.


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Kevin De Bruyne
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#380
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(Original post by Viggi)
I'm just going over C3 at the moment. Any tips? (Good to know that integration is so important for C4!)
Practice as much trig as you can from the textbook. Have a go at all of the past papers and see where you lose marks. Also have a look at the 2013/2014 papers if you can.
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