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    (Original post by manya.june)
    Courses
    Many courses available. Format of the courses vary. Some available formats are:
    Face to face
    Online (instant) lecture
    Skype based tutoring
    Online courses
    Course Duration: Some are one day some are two days. Skype or web-based tutoring available for those that are not able to attend physically. Some courses are expensive; some are not so. Look carefully and ask around. What does small group mean ? Some courses would say 25 is small group some would say that is too much. Decide what kind YOU are? Are you someone likely npt to ask if something is not clear due to the fear of looking like a fool in front of 24 or 99 other student? In that case, course will be a waste of time.
    Personally I feel that attending a UKCAT is pointless anyway because it is all about acquiring your own technique and surely there is enough material available around to be able to do that without forking out 100s of quids.

    Secondly, if one was to attend a course, given that those courses last say 8 hours, one you account for breaks/lunch that only gives 1.5 hours per section which is really not that much time. During those 1.5 hours you either talk about techniques but then you won't learn anything out of this world, or you end up just doing exercises, which you might as well do online or on a book. So I would say the only courses worth attending, if you really want to attend one, would be one that spans over more than one day.
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    (Original post by manya.june)
    1000 questions book. Is it the same or different to the 600 book. Is it worth getting. Yes, it is same book as 600 questions with 400 more to add up to 1000 (as some one said earlier). Have one or the other.
    Looking at it, the 1000Q book is fact has 500 new questions compared to the 600Q book, not 400. Here is why:

    Original 600Q book = 600 Questions
    MINUS 100 Decision Analysis Questions which are no longer needed
    PLUS 500 new questions
    = 1000Q

    So it is indeed best to get the 1000Q instead of the 600Q.
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    Hi guys

    I took the exam yesterday and scored
    VR: 890 - AR:750 - QR: 870 - SJT -Band 1
    Used the Medify online bank and the 1000Q book by ISC Medical.
    Thought I would share some of my methods:

    VR
    The texts in the exam seem to have about 300-350 words and so you can't possibly read all of that properly in detail and answer questions as well unless you learn to read fast. When I prepared I tried both methods :

    Method 1 - Read the text properly and then go to the questions, but then I found that reading the text without knowing what I was looking for was a bit of a challenge because you are never quite sure as to what you are supposed to remember. The key I think is to be able to process the information as you go through the text and in that sense it make total sense to read the questions first. See Method 2 below, which I ended up using in the end.

    Method 2 - Reading the questions first gave me an idea of they type of thing I needed to look for in the text. So when I prepared and also at the exam yesterday, whenever a new text appeared I used the Next button to see all the questions for that text before pressing the Previous button to go back to the first question. That way, when I read the text I could see more quickly what sections were pretty much irrelevant and which ones mattered.

    In terms of balance of questions, all texts pretty much had the same lengths and the ration of True/False v. wordy questions was about 1/3 True/False. 2/3 wordy. However I do know that one of my neighbours in the centre was complaining that he had no True/False at all, whilst the guy on the other side nearly had half of
    his questions as True/False. Given that the T/F questions tend to be easier I wonder how this is all calibrated.

    QR
    The issue with QR is timing but I'm sure I am not telling you anything new here. And the trick is to try and avoid using the calculator unless you really have to. I know that some of the college friends end up using a calculator to compute 15x3 + 2.3 x 0 + 3x2.2, but obviously you can waste 10 seconds doing that. The calculator is pretty stable but doing it with the mouse is awkward.

    Difficulty wise, I had a mix of questions. Some really easy stuff (e.g. add up two numbers from a table), but also some pretty complex stuff. The complex stuff was complex for several reasons:

    (i) either it meant having to sift through long tables to find the correct information
    (ii) or it meant several stages of calculation. The challenge for those is that the calculator does not allow you to store much in memory so you have to make sure you write your intermediary calcs on the whiteboard.

    Some of the hard questions took me 50 seconds whilst the easier ones took maybe 10 second. In the end i finished the QR section with 2 minutes spare,

    AR
    AR was a real problem for me during the revision because I found it so hard at first was nearly in tears. I first did a few on the official website and got stuck for nearly 10 minutes on something that ended up being a fairly simple relationship. So what I did, instead of persevering with timed practice was to learn what I should be looking for so that I could spot it more quickly. That took a bit of time because for this one you really have to find your own way of thinking. But in the end you realise there are only so many things you need to look for e.g.:

    - Absolute/Relative position of objects
    - Absolute/Relative size of objects
    - Number of objects/sides/angles
    - Colour
    - Rotations / symmetries
    - Intersections

    With that you cover 90% of the issues.
    But nothing will prepare you for it other than practice and getting used to patterns. Don't worry if it's a struggle to start with. It does get easier.

    SJT
    When you prepare for SJTs (and here again practice is key) you quickly realise it's always the same. There are questions about colleagues who are bad team players, who cheat, who say inappropriate things, etc. And in the end you kinda get bored with it. In the same that the questions are always the same, the answers are also always the same. So I would say the key for good preparation is to make sure that you understand the principles behind the answers before you do any practice. In that sense there is little value in doing timed practice for SJTs until you have understood why the answer is what it is. The way I did it is go through the official UKCAT questions and the ISC 1000Q book one by one and make sure I understood why the answer was what it was. Then when I did the mock exams I got nearly 100% questions right.

    DM
    Don't waste your time on that; it;s just an annoying distraction.

    Hope this helps
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    Well done! Those scores are amazing!

    Thank you for the tips as well

    Where are you planning on applying for?
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    Oh, wow, thank you very much for all the tips about the subtests.

    For QR, I was also thinking that the calculator took up a lot of time and I am doing some exercises to strengthen my mental arithmetics skills.

    The disparity between candidates of the type of questions they get for VR is quite puzzling. Surely it's not fair that some get more T/F/CT questions. Those are the easiest.
    It's strange that they seem to invest a lot of effort in coming up with new types of questions nearly every year, but don't seem to look much at fairness. i wonder if those who write the questions have actually taken the actual test themselves. Maybe they should!
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    Well, I have just registered online for UKCAT. What a palaver! (palava, palaver, whatever).

    Why do they ask you all those questions about parents occupation, how many employees in their company, etc.
    I was half expecting they would ask me what date my great-grand-mother got married and what kind of contraception she used!

    Is all that stuff really necessary for research purposes?
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    (Original post by Maw1979)
    Thats the Kaplan method of scoring in their book. It's pretty accurate. Which is bloody depressing.
    How do you know that it is accurate?

    Because I can't really see how we can really measure that unless we double scored people's exam results with the official and the Kaplan scale.
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    (Original post by WTF2016)
    Well, I have just registered online for UKCAT. What a palaver! (palava, palaver, whatever).

    Why do they ask you all those questions about parents occupation, how many employees in their company, etc.
    I was half expecting they would ask me what date my great-grand-mother got married and what kind of contraception she used!

    Is all that stuff really necessary for research purposes?
    LOL, yes indeed. With all the information they collect, you'd think the UKCAT would be more stable than it is by now.

    Why do they keep changing it anyway? I thought this was because they were trying to select candidates which are least likely to drop out, but surely it would take several years to collect that data, and if you keep changing the exam every year then you haven't really got the opportunity to see what effect the changes have had years down the line.

    I am starting to think we are guinea pigs. And I am presuming that some unis have the same feeling about the UKCAT because the fact they all use the results in a different way means that there are different views about its usefulness. But I guess that Medicine cannot be seen to have a less stringent recruitment process than other disciplines.
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    (Original post by Whoknowswhy)
    Hi guys

    I took the exam yesterday and scored
    VR: 890 - AR:750 - QR: 870 - SJT -Band 1
    Used the Medify online bank and the 1000Q book by ISC Medical.
    Thought I would share some of my methods:

    VR
    The texts in the exam seem to have about 300-350 words and so you can't possibly read all of that properly in detail and answer questions as well unless you learn to read fast. When I prepared I tried both methods :

    Method 1 - Read the text properly and then go to the questions, but then I found that reading the text without knowing what I was looking for was a bit of a challenge because you are never quite sure as to what you are supposed to remember. The key I think is to be able to process the information as you go through the text and in that sense it make total sense to read the questions first. See Method 2 below, which I ended up using in the end.

    Method 2 - Reading the questions first gave me an idea of they type of thing I needed to look for in the text. So when I prepared and also at the exam yesterday, whenever a new text appeared I used the Next button to see all the questions for that text before pressing the Previous button to go back to the first question. That way, when I read the text I could see more quickly what sections were pretty much irrelevant and which ones mattered.

    In terms of balance of questions, all texts pretty much had the same lengths and the ration of True/False v. wordy questions was about 1/3 True/False. 2/3 wordy. However I do know that one of my neighbours in the centre was complaining that he had no True/False at all, whilst the guy on the other side nearly had half of
    his questions as True/False. Given that the T/F questions tend to be easier I wonder how this is all calibrated.

    QR
    The issue with QR is timing but I'm sure I am not telling you anything new here. And the trick is to try and avoid using the calculator unless you really have to. I know that some of the college friends end up using a calculator to compute 15x3 + 2.3 x 0 + 3x2.2, but obviously you can waste 10 seconds doing that. The calculator is pretty stable but doing it with the mouse is awkward.

    Difficulty wise, I had a mix of questions. Some really easy stuff (e.g. add up two numbers from a table), but also some pretty complex stuff. The complex stuff was complex for several reasons:

    (i) either it meant having to sift through long tables to find the correct information
    (ii) or it meant several stages of calculation. The challenge for those is that the calculator does not allow you to store much in memory so you have to make sure you write your intermediary calcs on the whiteboard.

    Some of the hard questions took me 50 seconds whilst the easier ones took maybe 10 second. In the end i finished the QR section with 2 minutes spare,

    AR
    AR was a real problem for me during the revision because I found it so hard at first was nearly in tears. I first did a few on the official website and got stuck for nearly 10 minutes on something that ended up being a fairly simple relationship. So what I did, instead of persevering with timed practice was to learn what I should be looking for so that I could spot it more quickly. That took a bit of time because for this one you really have to find your own way of thinking. But in the end you realise there are only so many things you need to look for e.g.:

    - Absolute/Relative position of objects
    - Absolute/Relative size of objects
    - Number of objects/sides/angles
    - Colour
    - Rotations / symmetries
    - Intersections

    With that you cover 90% of the issues.
    But nothing will prepare you for it other than practice and getting used to patterns. Don't worry if it's a struggle to start with. It does get easier.

    SJT
    When you prepare for SJTs (and here again practice is key) you quickly realise it's always the same. There are questions about colleagues who are bad team players, who cheat, who say inappropriate things, etc. And in the end you kinda get bored with it. In the same that the questions are always the same, the answers are also always the same. So I would say the key for good preparation is to make sure that you understand the principles behind the answers before you do any practice. In that sense there is little value in doing timed practice for SJTs until you have understood why the answer is what it is. The way I did it is go through the official UKCAT questions and the ISC 1000Q book one by one and make sure I understood why the answer was what it was. Then when I did the mock exams I got nearly 100% questions right.

    DM
    Don't waste your time on that; it;s just an annoying distraction.

    Hope this helps
    Can I pm you for ukcat advice?
    That's amazing scores
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    phew just done mine, this must be a wierd distribution of scores:

    VR 590
    QR 890
    AR 890

    So average is 790. I hope this means I can get interviews with all my preferred GEM programs (Southampton, Warwick, Newcastle), but it will depend on the VR cutoff this year for Warwick. Good luck to everyone about to take theirs.
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    Hi guys,

    A quick question. I'm slightly confused but I should know the answer seen as I did the UKCAT 3 years ago...

    On the website it says:

    VR: 44 items that means 44 questions from how many passages?

    Also well done to those who've done really well this year! Any tips? I have medify*and the ISC 600Q book
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    (Original post by TheArtOfThePoetic)
    Hi guys,

    A quick question. I'm slightly confused but I should know the answer seen as I did the UKCAT 3 years ago...

    On the website it says:

    VR: 44 items that means 44 questions from how many passages?

    Also well done to those who've done really well this year! Any tips? I have medify*and the ISC 600Q book
    It says on this page: http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/about-the-test/verbal-reasoning/
    "44 items associated with 11 reading passages"
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    (Original post by UKCATrocks)
    It says on this page: http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/about-the-test/verbal-reasoning/
    "44 items associated with 11 reading passages"
    oh thank you must have missed it *
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    (Original post by Hugh Laurie)
    phew just done mine, this must be a wierd distribution of scores:

    VR 590
    QR 890
    AR 890

    So average is 790. I hope this means I can get interviews with all my preferred GEM programs (Southampton, Warwick, Newcastle), but it will depend on the VR cutoff this year for Warwick. Good luck to everyone about to take theirs.
    Looking at the UKCAT website (http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/App_Media/upl...sed%202014.pdf) it seems that the average for those without a PhD was 750 and for those with a PhD: 675 to be invited to interview. Do they also look at individual scores as well as the average?
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    (Original post by UKCATrocks)
    Looking at the UKCAT website (http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/App_Media/upl...sed%202014.pdf) it seems that the average for those without a PhD was 750 and for those with a PhD: 675 to be invited to interview. Do they also look at individual scores as well as the average?
    i think before they rank the ukcat scores, they apply a cutoff on the VR score as they believe VR is a good indicator for future success. im trying to find some data on previous years mean VR scores for Warwick applicants but suspect they might not release them.

    'We use the UKCAT verbal reasoning score as one of the predictors of success in certain examinations at medical school. Our first round of selection therefore identifies those with a verbal reasoning score at or above the mean for the cohort sitting UKCAT in a the year of application. Those scoring below the cohort mean will be rejected at this stage. Those with scores above the cohort mean will then have points awarded for their total UKCAT score, with higher total UKCAT scores receiving higher points.'

    from
    http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/med/st...tryreqs/#uckat

    edit: my bad. the cohort refers to everyone sitting the ukcat that year, rather than the cohort of warwick applicants that year. (you can see how i got 590 VR).

    here are the results for previous years (http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/App_Media/upl...02015%20v2.pdf)
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    (Original post by TheArtOfThePoetic)
    oh thank you must have missed it *
    In fact the 2015 technical report for UKCAT says it is 40 questions (10 x 4) which are marked + 4 questions (1 x 4) which are not marked.

    That seems really odd. I can see why they might want to test questions on real candidates but what if you get stuck 20 minutes on the ones that do not get marked?
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    (Original post by UKCATrocks)
    In fact the 2015 technical report for UKCAT says it is 40 questions (10 x 4) which are marked + 4 questions (1 x 4) which are not marked.

    That seems really odd. I can see why they might want to test questions on real candidates but what if you get stuck 20 minutes on the ones that do not get marked?
    Ah yeah that seems pretty weird and quite unfair :/
    I just hope it goes well, I feel like it's impossible to do well right now
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    (Original post by Hugh Laurie)
    i think before they rank the ukcat scores, they apply a cutoff on the VR score as they believe VR is a good indicator for future success. im trying to find some data on previous years mean VR scores for Warwick applicants but suspect they might not release them.

    'We use the UKCAT verbal reasoning score as one of the predictors of success in certain examinations at medical school. Our first round of selection therefore identifies those with a verbal reasoning score at or above the mean for the cohort sitting UKCAT in a the year of application. Those scoring below the cohort mean will be rejected at this stage. Those with scores above the cohort mean will then have points awarded for their total UKCAT score, with higher total UKCAT scores receiving higher points.'

    from
    http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/med/st...tryreqs/#uckat

    edit: my bad. the cohort refers to everyone sitting the ukcat that year, rather than the cohort of warwick applicants that year. (you can see how i got 590 VR).

    here are the results for previous years (http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/App_Media/upl...02015%20v2.pdf)
    The technical UKCAT report posted on the official site, which shows last year's results shows that the average for VR last year across all cohorts was 577. So, if people find it hard this year, you might be in with a chance.
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    (Original post by UKCATrocks)
    The technical UKCAT report posted on the official site, which shows last year's results shows that the average for VR last year across all cohorts was 577. So, if people find it hard this year, you might be in with a chance.
    yes, it should be ok seeing as the score floats around the 560-80 mark the past couple of years, fingers crossed we dont have too many strong linguists this year ^^. how are you feeling about your scores and the schools youd like to apply to?
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    (Original post by TheArtOfThePoetic)
    Ah yeah that seems pretty weird and quite unfair :/
    I just hope it goes well, I feel like it's impossible to do well right now
    dont worry. i felt the same when i started preparing for ukcat. i saw distinct improvements in my AR section after a few weeks of practice. the QR questions in the real exams were much easier and straight forward than most of my mocks/practice questions. just dont stress and focus on developing solid techniques and youll be fine.
 
 
 
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