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The most Overrated and Underrated Universities in the UK Watch

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Yes, because they have dedicated recruiters for each 'set' of universities they focus most of their recruiting efforts on. You forget as well that they have data from previous Vac Scheme/Trainee cohorts to draw from too... All of this can be gathered if you have the right ins/contacts.

    Unfortunately, I'm not going to sit and count every single event from both but it's pretty obvious the magnitude of events is greater at Warwick. They have both a Law society that holds events, and a commercial law society within the finance society that holds their own events too.


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    At Exeter, we have two societies which host events as well—one of which was created only 2 years ago and got Steve Edge to visit just a month ago. You really are showing you're clueless here when it comes to law.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Yes, because they have dedicated recruiters for each 'set' of universities they focus most of their recruiting efforts on. You forget as well that they have data from previous Vac Scheme/Trainee cohorts to draw from too... All of this can be gathered if you have the right ins/contacts.

    Unfortunately, I'm not going to sit and count every single event from both but it's pretty obvious the magnitude of events is greater at Warwick. They have both a Law society that holds events, and a commercial law society within the finance society that holds their own events too.


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    Those "dedicated recruiters" are usually alumni - hardly dedicated in the way you're talking about. They have presentations, interrupt lecturers and have silly tea-parties.

    I am well aware that they have a list - you asked them to tell you about such lists, and they gave you a break-down? And that's from firms that recruit up to the 100s? Well.

    It's not obvious at all.
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    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    Vendetta? Wtf lol.

    You're trying to tell me that Warwick is not elevated to heaven by all Warwick students? Please...
    Dude, no one's elevating here.. In fact, the only one consciously trying to downplay a university (that has been targeted by and has supplied a solid proportion of recruits to law firms) is you.

    I even presented data collected by a third party, but nope, that's not good enough apparently.

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    Underrated: Essex
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Dude, no one's elevating here.. In fact, the only one consciously trying to downplay a university (that has been targeted by and has supplied a solid proportion of recruits to law firms) is you.

    I even presented data collected by a third party, but nope, that's not good enough apparently.

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    Wait a minute. You do not think Warwick students on here generally are trying to present Warwick as a super-duper elite university?

    And I am not trying to downplay it - it's a good uni. I am simply weary of the people that think it's Oxbridge in everything it does.
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    (Original post by *Stefan*)
    Wait a minute. You do not think Warwick students on here generally are trying to present Warwick as a super-duper elite university?

    And I am not trying to downplay it - it's a good uni. I am simply weary of the people that think it's Oxbridge in everything it does.
    Some might, but they tend to be the ones studying subjects where it is a top tier player. But in general, I think most Warwick students are level headed about the university's standing.



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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Some might, but they tend to be the ones studying subjects where it is a top tier player. But in general, I think most Warwick students are level headed about the university's standing.



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    Hardly.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    It's a pretty good guide, and in my opinion an accurate representation..

    From speaking to a fair number of recruiters in the London legal sector, this is how they 'bucketed' out universities for representation and where they recruit/receive most applications from - not in order:

    Bucket 1
    - Cambridge
    - Oxford

    Bucket 2
    - Bristol
    - Durham
    - LSE
    - KCL
    - Manchester (possibly)
    - Nottingham
    - UCL
    - Warwick

    Bucket 3
    - Birmingham
    - Exeter
    - Leeds
    - Sheffield
    - QMUL
    - etc.

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    Once you start working and in contact with recruiters regularly, you'll soon realise they talk out their arse.

    Some even thought a 2:2 is a made up degree class and others confused an S-Level with AS-Level.
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    Overrated: Aston
    Underrated: Bath
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    (Original post by RussellG)
    x
    I really enjoy your perspectives so again thank you for sharing them! Of course, I agree there are great US public universities, but like you said, judging by what I expect in an academic environment- the chances are slim that a top 30 school would even suit me. I could see myself liking UCBerkeley but that's really the only exception. I wouldn't even prefer UCLA

    (And sorry the Warwick-UCSB thing was quite a HORRIBLE comparison. If I ever ended up choosing UCSB over Warwick, hypothetically, it would most certainly not be because of the education experience. Probably more just the campus environment if anything. Even with the academic cons of the UK system, I would definitely choose it academically over UCSB to be honest )

    Sure top 30-40 schools don't have a certain programme dedicated to i.e. BBB students, but it would be ridiculous to assert that just because they don't have a programme that needs to be filled with less academically qualified students...they have less BBB students than a UK school.

    I was more disappointed in the fact that good schools like LSE have ABB students. Its no surprise to see a top 30-40 public school in the USA have them, but at LSE and UCL? For schools that are still better than these USA state schools, they really should be having less, not equal (ishhh), students with such academic marks. Idk if you see where I am coming from but yeah!

    I also agree with you-our higher educational system is no worse than the United States and vice versa. It all comes down to a student's preference.

    http://yaledailynews.com/blog/2010/0...yales-breadth/
    I thought this was a great article from an Oxbridge student that explained the differences. There really is no right answer when it comes to "which system is better" like you have said Sorry if it came off as I think the USA higher education is superior!

    Even with less lecture hours at Oxbridge, I am certain the Oxbridge students and HYPSM students equally emerge out of university with a full hands-on grasp in the field they specialised in. Some thrive under university environments with less lectures, some thrive under environments with more. I am most definitely the latter, hence why I don't think the higher education system here is best suited for me :P I especially value more lectures in small-classrooms--it gives me, as a student, a great chance to hear what my peers have to say, interact with my professors.

    I have always looked at uni as a place where not only can I grow to become an independent person, but also be able to interact with scholars around me. After all I have all my life to educate myself, when I'm in uni I'd like the opportunity to do something different. I especially prefer a place where though there's more lecture hours, I still have just as many readings as an Oxbridge student (hence why I found Columbia the perfect place for me XD)

    I think I also felt a bit happier when applying to USA schools because their admissions is so holistic. It feels like they have really tried to create a utopian uni environment with students with the best personalities mixed with academics (obviously there will be exceptions in any place but you get me i think :P)

    No doubt, Oxbridge students have flourishing personalities, but I wonder would it be EVEN BETTER than it is now, if their admissions also really considered the unique personalities of each student? After all, none of us should be just valued by how we can critically think and use our knowledge--we are more than our academics. (i.e. both MIT and Imperial are STEM schools but the latter tends to have a drearier environment lol!)

    Personally I don't mind the marking systems at the private universities I applied (and as hellish as the grade deflation is at certain schools, I thrive under pressure even though I know its not very good for me lol :3). From what my brother told me its much, much more like the UK marking system which I absolutely adore
    The ehhh kind of state schools easily mark students with 4.0 or some kind of absurd nonsense. Even at London Met you would not see that happen lol! I see so many Arizona state kids (lmao!) graduate with 4.0 GPAs and I'm like no way lol its virtually impossible to get one at UChicago or Oxbridge. No offence to them, but if we were to equate it to a school like MIT it would be probably be like a 2.5 GPA or a 2:2 here .___.
    It was incredibly difficult for my brother to even receive above a 3.6 GPA there with the grade deflation and the grading isn't straightforward like you find at so many ridiculous public universities.

    One small thing I do like is how in the USA they have a different honours system...magna *** laude, summa *** laude--I like that distinction, and it still requires a bit different procedures to graduate summa *** laude than First class Honours
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    (Original post by frognation22)
    I was more disappointed in the fact that good schools like LSE have ABB students.
    Don't meant to jut into your discussion like that, but I personally wouldn't worry too much about the offers themselves- the AAB* subjects tend to be fairly low-demand ones like Econ w/ Econ History or Sociology/Anthropology, and, even then, the actual grades of the students going there tend to be far higher than the offer. LSE students have, on average, 530 UCAS points (which granted, is inflated by IB, but is still quite high), whereas UCL has ~500 - hardly a lowly achievement.

    Source
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    Don't meant to jut into your discussion like that, but I personally wouldn't worry too much about the offers themselves- the AAB* subjects tend to be fairly low-demand ones like Econ w/ Econ History or Sociology/Anthropology, and, even then, the actual grades of the students going there tend to be far higher than the offer. LSE students have, on average, 530 UCAS points (which granted, is inflated by IB, but is still quite high), whereas UCL ~500 - hardly a lowly achievement.
    No problem! Thanks for telling me this
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    (Original post by frognation22)
    No problem! Thanks for telling me this
    Also, according to this (albeit dated, but it shouldn't have changed much), LSE has a 92.5% proportion of AAB or above students.

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    I have a few friends at Warwick and they all attest that the law school is pretty poor.
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    I am interested in this topic as well, and in figuring out whether UCL or IC is better for business, especially in entrepreneurship. UCL has MSc Technology Entrepreneurship, and IC has MSc IEM.
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    (Original post by VictoriaQ)
    I am interested in this topic as well, and in figuring out whether UCL or IC is better for business, especially in entrepreneurship. UCL has MSc Technology Entrepreneurship, and IC has MSc IEM.
    Imperial College Business School is hands down better for prestige/ranking. I can't comment on the specifics, though.
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    Overrated: St Andrews
    Underrated: Coventry

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    (Original post by frognation22)
    x
    Thank you for your reply. and mostly I agree with you.
    In addition to your linked article, From my personal impression, I found students from UK top schools tend to be "deep thinkers" whereas students from equivalent US top schools have more tendency to be "adaptable quick learners". It's clearly a result of how universities provide their education. And which is more beneficial for human civilisation? Too hard to answer. But I'm naturally more like a thinker rather than a quick learner. And I'm bad at studying too many subjects.at once. As a result, I feel comfortable with the UK HE system.

    I'll tell you one more interesting example of how university education affects the development of characteristics. You know, Continental European universities are often free and opened to everyone who wants to study further. Because people regard university education as public goods like public libraries much stronger than US and to some extent UK. But as a result, universities are always overcrowded, always someone is speaking during a lecture, sometimes even students cant hear anything what professor says. Libraries don't have enough resources, especially when it comes to online. No private contact to professors, and no tutoring hours. As a result, they have infamous and cruel dropout rate.

    For example, at Pantheon Sorbonne, about 70% of first year students drop out (90% at medical studies in other UofParis), and after that, in every year 50% of students drop out. So less than 10% of students who enter there will successfully graduate. Average self-study hours at Sorbonne are roughly speaking 30 hours per week, and this is even not enough to just graduate.

    I saw several people who graduated under such environment, and I found they tend to be mentally tough like war survivors especially those who got higher marks. Sometimes they are the best in postgraduate courses or work places. They are quite reliable when it comes to have some difficult situation. They don't run away and tackle with it mechanically. I found them useful and credible in their own way, and feel safer to work with them (although not all European universities, many have just open entrances and relatively open exits).

    I will never attend those universities, because then I will drop out. However, I respect this system as one of many forms of education. After all, all developed countries must have decent human resource development systems, that's why they could be developed. That's my belief.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Also, according to this (albeit dated, but it shouldn't have changed much), LSE has a 92.5% proportion of AAB or above students.

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    I think the situation has been changed a lot since this period. It says 2009-2010 entrants, so basically this year. Meanwhile all top universities have made their entry requirements much stricter to respond to grade inflation at A levels. Imperial scrapped undergraduate courses for Management requiring AAB(could be even ABB) and some others, as a result they only require AAA or higher now. Cambridge revised its unpopular land management course to land economy degree with A*AA. LSE used to require ABB to candidates willing to study courses like Anthropology, now all become AAB. Durham's lowest requirement is AAB now with Management and some others, but it used to be BBB around this period. The bottom requirement at UCL was BBB (for several Engineering and Humanities courses), but now at least ABB or higher.

    So, I guess at least at Imperial(95.7%), LSE(92.5%), and Durham(84.7%) this percentage of AAB+ students right now must be something like 99-100%, also over 90% at other top universities like UCL and Warwick.
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    (Original post by AJ KO)
    I have a few friends at Warwick and they all attest that the law school is pretty poor.
    It's axiomatic.
 
 
 
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