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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I'm the competitive, uber ambitious type willing to work very hard to get to where I want to be
    ...and then life happens

    http://kwout.com/cutout/b/zj/6t/94x_bor_sha.jpg
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Less competition to get in, less upside available, less internal competition, more stable job with 'normal' hours, an eventual responsibility plateau etc..

    For example, in a standard corporation, most will plateau around their 30s with the exceptional workers rising to executive levels by their mid 40s earliest. In comparison to consulting/law/ib, where by mid thirties you've accelerated through the ranks.

    It's hard to define, but average is where you have some growth opportunities but on the whole it's not as steep as say high finance/top tech/consulting/tech entrepreneurship...

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    Higher paid career doesnt equal better career or better "worker". With respect to hours worked, the average investment banker would probably start weeping half-way through the day if they tried working in an all-day restaurant as a chef.
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    Degree: Optometry/Therapeutic Radiography (don't know which one yet)
    Jobs/Careers of Interest: Optometrist/Radiographer
    Graduate Salary Expected: Optometrist 28-30k/Radiographer 25k
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    (Original post by sameehaiqbal)
    Degree: Optometry/Therapeutic Radiography (don't know which one yet)
    Jobs/Careers of Interest: Optometrist/Radiologist
    Graduate Salary Expected: Optometrist 28-30k/Radiologist 25k
    Need to have a medical degree to be a radiologist
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    (Original post by Chwirkytheappleboy)
    ...and then life happens

    LOOOOOOL..

    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Higher paid career doesnt equal better career or better "worker". With respect to hours worked, the average investment banker would probably start weeping half-way through the day if they tried working in an all-day restaurant as a chef.
    True, can't argue that hours worked =/= intensity or physical assertion.

    It's not even about the pay, I'm talking more about the environment more than anything. Doing I-banking or consulting or 'insert top career here' will put you in a fast paced 'pseudo-intellectual' environment that just isn't as possible to mirror in a conglomerate or standard provincial small-mid size business with more of a 9-6 lifestyle.

    Average is subjective to be perfectly honest. For some the latter of the two proposed options is their idea of a 'top' career and the other former is more the idea of a nightmare of a career.
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Higher paid career doesnt equal better career or better "worker". With respect to hours worked, the average investment banker would probably start weeping half-way through the day if they tried working in an all-day restaurant as a chef.
    what are you trying to say here?

    what is the relationship to being a better worker
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    (Original post by Asklepios)
    Need to have a medical degree to be a radiologist
    No you dont: http://www.qmu.ac.uk/courses/UGCourse.cfm?c_id=74
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Doing I-banking or consulting or 'insert top career here' will put you in a fast paced 'pseudo-intellectual' environment that just isn't as possible to mirror in a conglomerate or standard provincial small-mid size business with more of a 9-6 lifestyle.
    What's made you make that assumption? I think a lot of people in various industries that work in that type of environment might argue that they work in a more fast paced environment (often not tied down to processes as much) and could be more intellectual.

    I think about people I know who work for small/regional businesses whose responsibility is far greater and varied than anyone working for a very large multinational. It's the whole big fish in a small pond vs small fish in a big pond point.

    The contracts they are working with may have a few less 0s but that's the only thing I can see as being "lesser" or more average.


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    (Original post by J-SP)
    What's made you make that assumption? I think a lot of people in various industries that work in that type of environment might argue that they work in a more fast paced environment (often not tied down to processes as much) and could be more intellectual.

    I think about people I know who work for small/regional businesses whose responsibility is far greater and varied than anyone working for a very large multinational. It's the whole big fish in a small pond vs small fish in a big pond point.

    The contracts they are working with may have a few less 0s but that's the only thing I can see as being "lesser" or more average.


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    That's the general feel I get from those who work in the aforementioned industries. And note, I said 'pseudointellectual' as in there is a general expectation to speak in a high level, professional manner and the majority of teams being made up of graduates from top unis pushes this image of everyone being 'smart' - even though that isn't the case all the time, and is mostly kool aid for recruitment.

    I guess it varies. Sure, an SME consulting business that's growing with a lot of clients taking interest in them would be an exciting environment to work in. A rapidly expanding tech company would also be great. But, personally, I feel the stereotypical 9-6 lifestyle with limited growth potential is not as exciting a prospect. There's more of a laissez faire expectation that comes with that kind of set up.

    'More 0s' comes with more complexity and responsibility though.



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    (Original post by sabana)
    Yes I understand teaching is not the best of jobs and teachers have a lot of pressure but it's what I'm interested in and what I'd enjoy so that's all that matters. If I end up hating it there's no reason I can't change career later on especially with a 2:1 in maths.
    One of the best attitudes ive seen on TSR regarding careers.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    That's the general feel I get from those who work in the aforementioned industries. And note, I said 'pseudointellectual' as in there is a general expectation to speak in a high level, professional manner and the majority of teams being made up of graduates from top unis pushes this image of everyone being 'smart' - even though that isn't the case all the time, and is mostly kool aid for recruitment.

    I guess it varies. Sure, an SME consulting business that's growing with a lot of clients taking interest in them would be an exciting environment to work in. A rapidly expanding tech company would also be great. But, personally, I feel the stereotypical 9-6 lifestyle with limited growth potential is not as exciting a prospect. There's more of a laissez faire expectation that comes with that kind of set up.

    'More 0s' comes with more complexity and responsibility though.



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    I don't agree with your last point, especially if your involvement in the matter with a few more 0s is very specific vs someone working with a couple of less 0s but doing a lot more variety within it.

    I also think your presumptions about the "typical 9-6" without growth is also flawed. Rapid growth is only one point - there's other ways for business to succeed and bring a lot of interesting aspects to the work.

    But this comes down to your personal interest and preferences, which has influenced your perceptions, rather than reality, and it's very clear where your interests lie.

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    Yes, you do. You're confusing Radiography and Radiology

    Radiographers obtain images and/or deliver radiotherapy

    Radiologists are doctors who interpret those images and sometimes undertake medical procedures with imaging guidance
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    (Original post by Chwirkytheappleboy)
    Yes, you do. You're confusing Radiography and Radiology

    Radiographers obtain images and/or deliver radiotherapy

    Radiologists are doctors who interpret those images and sometimes undertake medical procedures with imaging guidance
    Yeah my mistake, I made a typo. I meant Radiography.
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    (Original post by Asklepios)
    *250 actually

    I'm not saying having money is bad, but being so money-minded that making money is your primary career intention is just sad.
    It's easy to say this when you already have money
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    Degree: Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence
    Careers/Jobs: Unknown
    Salary: Unknown

    This may be considered as not directly related but I think it is and I would like other people's opinion.

    I have this 'fear', so I call it anyway, that if I were to work for a company large or small whether it be in Investment Banking, Computing or any sector in which I enjoy, that I would eventually hit a point in my career where I can no longer move forward. Some may then say, well change firm or even sector and continue to climb the ladder of your career but let's say you've hit a stage where there is no longer any opportunity to significantly move forward, you've worked 30 odd years to reach that stage. But for me I feel a great sense of disappointment in the fact that you've put all this work into a company in which you reap no reward, I may of earned hundreds of thousands or even millions of pounds but what you have achieved for the firm really isn't yours, it's the firms achievement or successes. As soon as you leave the company continues as if nothing has happened. I might have not put my point across correctly as I'm finding it hard to express it in words.

    All of the above may be because I do not want to work for somebody, sure in the starting years when you're learning the trade I would want a 'mentor' if you were to call it that. But Ultimately I would want to create something of my own and build a company from that, no one above in the pecking order telling you what to do. The effort you put in to the company is something in which you will reap the rewards for. You are the boss, people look up to you, you set the example to the workers, you deal with office issues. Probably cause my father was an entrepreneur himself, starting with nothing and building a successful business, from him is where my desire has come from and how he especially, along with my mother has brought me up.

    What are your opinions on what I've just said? Would you agree/disagree with any point? Would you like me to explain my views further on anything? Fire away!


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    (Original post by JP298)
    x
    Plenty of people use IB/Consulting/top tech as a training ground to figure out what they want before starting up their own companies. There is a long lineage of ex-banker/ex-strategy consultant/ex-Googlers branching out, many finding success because they have the credibility of a strong brand on their CVs to convince investors.

    Fact of the matter is most high growth tech startups are founded by people with name brand experiences/educations, and there certainly is a bias towards certain backgrounds by venture capitalists.

    Even if you do end up trying (and failing), you'd still have a pathway to get back on a 'track' at a large company.

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    Degree: History

    Jobs/Careers of Interest: I'd quite like to teach for a while and then become a research historian.

    Graduate Salary Expected: I haven't the foggiest - 20,000 or 21,000 GBP a year?
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    Degree: Criminal justice and criminology

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Plenty of people use IB/Consulting/top tech as a training ground to figure out what they want before starting up their own companies. There is a long lineage of ex-banker/ex-strategy consultant/ex-Googlers branching out, many finding success because they have the credibility of a strong brand on their CVs to convince investors.

    Fact of the matter is most high growth tech startups are founded by people with name brand experiences/educations, and there certainly is a bias towards certain backgrounds by venture capitalists.

    Even if you do end up trying (and failing), you'd still have a pathway to get back on a 'track' at a large company.

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    Yes, I completely agree with you, many people have used these fields for training then branched out. Thanks for your input!


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    You mean a radiographer. A radiologist is different to a radiographer.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiology
 
 
 
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