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    (Original post by Athematica)
    In terms of the degree itself, which is what we're asking about here (not the career), especially in the more traditional courses, would you say rote memorisation dominates the learning style in medicine, relative to other courses?
    All degree subjects are predominantly memorisation with the exceptions being maths and physics

    I did a tiny smidgen of University level chemistry. I had to memorise tables of molecules; their names, skeletal formula and molecular formula. How is this any different to memorising anatomy?
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    (Original post by Athematica)
    In terms of the degree itself, which is what we're asking about here (not the career), especially in the more traditional courses, would you say rote memorisation dominates the learning style in medicine, relative to other courses?
    Not massively so compared to other life sciences degrees, except for the anatomy.

    There probably is a lot more memorisation compared to say an English degree, but I think that's to be expected. Regardless, I don't think the entire degree (which is 60% practical as opposed to theoretical training) can be negotiated merely on the basis of being a human parrot. Even pre-clinical exam questions nowadays are designed to be applied and clinically oriented, as opposed to merely "draw out this biochemical pathway" or "state all of the insertions and origins of these muscles".
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    (Original post by CJKAllstar)
    Awkward moment when you want to do PPE/Politics and Econ...

    Tbf though it's because I have a serious interest in politics and econ above any other subject, and though I'm not aiming to be an MP, I do want to work in politics.

    I'd agree though that people who take these subjects thinking it's a blagger's degree to power are probably overestimating just how useful PPE is or politics for that matter, it's one of the few courses that as the quality and prestige of your uni decreases, it becomes a lot more soft and probably a lot more useless, which is why I sorta have to get into a top uni...

    With that in mind I'd still say finance. In my experience, people who do finance or accounting of some sort think it's a one way ticket to become a successful entrepreneur, banker, accountant or whatever. In my school it's the single most popular choice for people without any actual serious interest in a subject who don't really know what they want to do. Realistically maths is a lot more useful for banking and accountancy, and entrepreneurship or management of some sort does not in themselves require a degree. Finance has its uses but from personal experience, it's highly overrated.
    Actually, maths isn't a lot more useful for banking and accountancy... The math you do in a math degree would be far more complex than actually required to become an accountant or banking, which is why an accounting and finance degree would be superior if you wanted to go through this pathway. Also finance degrees offer exemptions which certain employers would like, thus saving lots of money and time to become fully qualified rather than doing a maths degree.

    Op, Economics and pharmacy imo.
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    Okay sure whatever. But medicine still isn't all about rote memorisation kthxbai.
    Totally rote memorisation. I just tell it like it is.
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    All of them! They are all ****, don't fall into the trap of debt!
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    I don't think there's any overrated degrees.

    I used to, but now I think a degree is just whatever a person makes of it. Just make sure to have fun along the way and do placements during your degree and you'll have a good time during and afterwards
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    (Original post by CharlieGEM)
    Totally rote memorisation. I just tell it like it is.
    How sad, to be in your 30s and still getting off on trolling a student forum :rolleyes:
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    Medicine.

    Its not a bad degree ofc. However, I've met a number of people with medicine degrees who talk down to everyone and seem to think they're geniuses. There are also a startling number of people who want to do a medicine degree.
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    Art
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    (Original post by Democracy)
    How sad, to be in your 30s and still getting off on trolling a student forum :rolleyes:
    I get paid good money to tutor various entrance exams and subjects covered well by this forum so it pays me to keep an eye. I can't resist the odd comment however.

    Must be sad to allegedly have a high flying career and yet still be having to defend it on student forums 😂
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    I have a friend who has just graduated with a degree in maths and has no job, yet I have 2 friends who have graduated with accounting and fiance both have jobs. One is now an accountant and the other works for a big bank.
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    (Original post by hopefuldentist10)
    All degree subjects are predominantly memorisation with the exceptions being maths and physics

    I did a tiny smidgen of University level chemistry. I had to memorise tables of molecules; their names, skeletal formula and molecular formula. How is this any different to memorising anatomy?
    I don't think things like accounting or computer science are memorisation are they?
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    (Original post by the IT MAN)
    I have a friend who has just graduated with a degree in maths and has no job, yet I have 2 friends who have graduated with accounting and fiance both have jobs. One is now an accountant and the other works for a big bank.
    Do you know which Unis they went to mate and what their a levels were? I'm also doing A+F but didn't get the best a levels (3 Cs) so was wandering if this would majorly hinder me
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    (Original post by hopefuldentist10)
    All degree subjects are predominantly memorisation with the exceptions being maths and physics

    I did a tiny smidgen of University level chemistry. I had to memorise tables of molecules; their names, skeletal formula and molecular formula. How is this any different to memorising anatomy?
    The difference is that chemistry students don't tend to have a stick up their ****.
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    (Original post by alexp98)
    I don't think things like accounting or computer science are memorisation are they?
    Accounting is pretty much the furthest thing from memorisation.
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    (Original post by GoingToBurst)
    Accounting is pretty much the furthest thing from memorisation.
    Accounting is part memorization and part problem solving.

    To do the problem solving you need to have memorized the basics first, then you have to apply your knowledge and problem solve because there will always be weird tricky situations/transactions.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
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    (Original post by Dhanny)
    Accounting is part memorization and part problem solving.

    To do the problem solving you need to have memorized the basics first, then you have to apply your knowledge and problem solve because there will always be weird tricky situations/transactions.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I'm sorry, but I disagree. Memorising the basics won't allow anyone to be able to solve complex accounting problems. Understanding the basics will. I could memorise all of the information provided in my lectures but I won't get very far if I don't study the principles behind that information. Is simply impossible to teach everything about accounting, but by understanding the principles you can certainly make a good go of any problem you are faced with.

    Even simple things like which accounts get debited and which get credited require more than memorisation. They require an understanding of why you are debiting/crediting that account and what the effect of it is.
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    (Original post by GoingToBurst)
    I'm sorry, but I disagree. Memorising the basics won't allow anyone to be able to solve complex accounting problems. Understanding the basics will. I could memorise all of the information provided in my lectures but I won't get very far if I don't study the principles behind that information. Is simply impossible to teach everything about accounting, but by understanding the principles you can certainly make a good go of any problem you are faced with.

    Even simple things like which accounts get debited and which get credited require more than memorisation. They require an understanding of why you are debiting/crediting that account and what the effect of it is.
    Ahhh yes, I completely forgot about the understanding. You are absolutely right, I made a mistake in not mentioning about the understanding although I have to say that there is memorization involved.
    How else would people know the layouts of statements and accounts such as the Income statement, Balance sheet, manufacturing account or even things such as the different IAS Standards and Accounting concepts.

    Yes, you can also say understanding automatically helps people remember though in my opinion id say its a bit of memory initially, then a lot of understanding and using that understanding and memorizing, a person gets on to applying the knowledge and understanding.
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    I'm not sure which I would classify as the most overrated, but I think humanities, especially English and History are vastly underrated. Although they don't appear to have a direct connection to any particular careers, they keep your options open and post-graduate study can lead to careers in Law, Diplomacy, Teaching, Academia, Journalism and working in large corporations in areas such as HR and marketing. The skills these degrees require are very transferable because they are based around answering a question using evidence that can be interpreted in a multitude of ways, and can sometimes be misinterpreted.
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    (Original post by Dhanny)
    Ahhh yes, I completely forgot about the understanding. You are absolutely right, I made a mistake in not mentioning about the understanding although I have to say that there is memorization involved.
    How else would people know the layouts of statements and accounts such as the Income statement, Balance sheet, manufacturing account or even things such as the different IAS Standards and Accounting concepts.

    Yes, you can also say understanding automatically helps people remember though in my opinion id say its a bit of memory initially, then a lot of understanding and using that understanding and memorizing, a person gets on to applying the knowledge and understanding.
    Oh yeah I totally agree, but being able to format financial statements becomes more of a habit than a memorisation game, in my opinion. Formatting the financial statements alone won't allow anyone to pass the course, they have to understand what they're actually doing. There is a memory aspect to everything, but memory alone won't allow anyone to pass an accounting class (maybe management accounting actually, it's generally pretty methodical and straight forward).
 
 
 
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