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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    Taking a history from a patient with bipolar disorder who was currently on a 'high' was the most challenging one I've done thus far. I failed dismally in getting anywhere with it.
    Surely mental state exam is more relevant in that situation..?
    & good experience to see mania - often the wards are more loaded with psychosis!
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    Score. Going into second year (albeit with a fairly poor pass, worth it for being a waster). Roll on the summer.
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    What would you guys say is the official class of drug for Allopurinol? Gout prophylactic?
    Xanthine oxidase inhibitor. Theres also a new one now as second line - Feboxestat ?spelling, this can be used in renal failure whereas allopurinol can't.
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    Xanthine oxidase inhibitor. Theres also a new one now as second line - Feboxestat ?spelling, this can be used in renal failure whereas allopurinol can't.
    Thanks. I would rep you, but apparently I've repped you too recently. Which is weird, because I can't remember the last time I did rep you :confused:
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    Spot diagnosis - young man turns up to ED unwell, pyrexial and running a tachy, he dosn't speak english, so no history, however, on shaking his hand you notice red flat smudgelike lesions on both palms, on further inspection, you are curious that these lesions also appear on the soles of the feet - this is apparently why the young man has pitched up.

    Differential, tests/diagnose and treat...and for bonus points - his occupation/risk factors
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    Xanthine oxidase inhibitor. Theres also a new one now as second line - Feboxestat ?spelling, this can be used in renal failure whereas allopurinol can't.
    I knew that! Going to an talk has served a purpose for once.
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    (Original post by Wangers)
    Spot diagnosis - young man turns up to ED unwell, pyrexial and running a tachy, he dosn't speak english, so no history, however, on shaking his hand you notice red flat smudgelike lesions on both palms, on further inspection, you are curious that these lesions also appear on the soles of the feet - this is apparently why the young man has pitched up.

    Differential, tests/diagnose and treat...and for bonus points - his occupation/risk factors
    The big differential ringing in my I'veforgottennearlyeverything head is

    Infective endocarditis -

    Can I have normal bloods (FBC at min), blood cultures and an echo, also ring a translator up for a full history.

    Tell me if I'm way off track :p:
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    (Original post by Philosoraptor)
    The big differential ringing in my I'veforgottennearlyeverything head is

    Infective endocarditis -

    Can I have normal bloods (FBC at min), blood cultures and an echo, also ring a translator up for a full history.

    Tell me if I'm way off track :p:

    Good shout on the Janeway lesions, not for him though, and its a spot diagnosis, you're not allowed bloods Match your wits against the A&E consultant, he got it in about a second...:cool:
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    Does anybody have a very basic, few sentences worth of a mechanism for warfarin?

    From what I understand it prevents vitamin K from being reduced/activated, which then somehow has an effect on clotting factors to make them not work?
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    Does anybody have a very basic, few sentences worth of a mechanism for warfarin?

    From what I understand it prevents vitamin K from being reduced/activated, which then somehow has an effect on clotting factors to make them not work?
    Vitamin K is required to form the biologically active clotting forms of the clotting factors 2 7 9 and 10. Warfarin inhibits the action of vitamin K to create the clotting factors. No clotting factors = no clotting (or less anyway).
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    (Original post by sidewalkwhenshewalks)
    Vitamin K is required to form the biologically active clotting forms of the clotting factors 2 7 9 and 10. Warfarin inhibits the action of vitamin K to create the clotting factors. No clotting factors = no clotting (or less anyway).
    Ahh that was the link that I was missing. Thanks :p:



    (All these inane questions will be over by Wednesday at the latest :p:)
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    Ahh that was the link that I was missing. Thanks :p:



    (All these inane questions will be over by Wednesday at the latest :p:)
    I quite liked haematology. Same I'm not very good at it.
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    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    I quite liked haematology. Same I'm not very good at it.
    I don't do haemotology until next year. It's rheumatology related It's for my SLE logbook cause the patient also had the associated anti-phospholipid syndrome.
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    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    I quite liked haematology. Same I'm not very good at it.
    Haem is ace, even like blood films which is very much against my histology hating ways.
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    (Original post by xXxBaby-BooxXx)
    I don't do haemotology until next year. It's rheumatology related It's for my SLE logbook cause the patient also had the associated anti-phospholipid syndrome.
    Ah ha. We didn't do any rheumatology this year.
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    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    Ah ha. We didn't do any rheumatology this year.
    The whole second half of my year was dedicated to rheum and ortho :p:
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    (Original post by Mushi_master)
    Haem is ace, even like blood films which is very much against my histology hating ways.
    There's something about the clotting cascade that is very satisfying.
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    (Original post by Fission_Mailed)
    There's something about the clotting cascade that is very satisfying.
    Admittedly the worst point about Haem in my book.
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    How are different peoples' semesters or terms split up over the pre clinical years? I'm always seeing people saying, oh this semester was immunology and embryology and things like that and it confuses me.

    Luckily I go to a med school for dim people and therefore the 4 semesters are, in order; Families and Children, Heart lungs and Blood, Mind and Movement, Nutrition Metabolism and Excretion...
    NICE AND BROAD
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    (Original post by Elles)
    Surely mental state exam is more relevant in that situation..?
    & good experience to see mania - often the wards are more loaded with psychosis!
    One would think so, but it was first year so building a rapport and eliciting some degree of history were the main aims. I did get history... quite a lot... just not the type I was expecting or wanting.
 
 
 
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