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    (Original post by JordanC55)
    I never visited or even applied but I just like the idea of living in Sheffield, I think it'd be a good uni city! What, they have an Amy building lol?

    I'm sure I'll get used to it, but it's going to be intense! I'm starting to fully grasp what I've let myself in for!

    Ah that's reassuring, did you buy many books?




    No it's not too bad but still if you were in clearing waiting around those extra few days could mean the difference between securing a place and now! I guess they've got to in order to ensure the get the right people but it still feels kinda mean to me considering they gave me an unconditional and didn't interview I thought they would be fairly relaxed.

    York St John English Language and Linguistics, 280 UCAS
    Nothing against the city just bad vibes from the interview. Now look on their website and find the alumni - I am there lol and yes they have an Amy building!!!!

    Don't worry you will get used to the timetable/workload though think you will find a vast difference from the first time round at uni

    I bought a few books - had a nightmare getting hold of the biological science book they recommended! One I would definitely buy (even if not recommended) is Phonetics A Coursebook by Rachael-Anne Knight. Interesting, clear and lots to practise. Oh yeah and From Birth to 5 Years - Mary Sheridan

    Let me know how your friend gets on - might be worth tracking down Butterfly95? she is at Strathclyde
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    (Original post by juliewho)
    Sounds very similar to Sheffield. Chunked into tiny modules that usually have several components, lots of very repetitive content, lots of overlap, lots of strangely-organised and timed modules... the list goes on!
    Hi - shouldn't but in sorry! It's really interesting to see peoples opinion of the various courses/unis. What year are you in? I have just done first year at MMU and though its sometimes a bit disjointed its nothing like as has been described at others. Do you have placements in first year?
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    (Original post by evantej)
    Generally you get sent information about a Facebook group from the university as it is something the older students organise themselves. The 2015-16 group is here. Last year I found there were lots of master's students in the group so do not worry if you do not find many undergraduates joining just yet. (Plus you will be in lessons with the master's students anyway so it is good to get to know them too).
    Thank you 😃
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    (Original post by AmyPilot)
    Hi - shouldn't but in sorry! It's really interesting to see peoples opinion of the various courses/unis. What year are you in? I have just done first year at MMU and though its sometimes a bit disjointed its nothing like as has been described at others. Do you have placements in first year?
    Hi Amy, i'm just about to start fourth year now. I think first year was a bit better in terms of clear modules and aims for the year and the modules tended to have equal teaching and just one assignment or exam, then it all went downhill from there and there is SO much repetition from previous years and overlap! We did have a "normal communication" placement in a nursery in first year.

    For example, in second year we diddevelopmental language and it's disorders in first semester - then a module in the second semester on language and aphasia, that was split into two full exams; then this year we did mental health and learning disabilities, even though we had completed our adult learning disability placement (which lots of uni's don't bother with, I was actually in your area for that!) in second year; and this year we are finally getting round to our first acute adult placement just now over summer, after completing cognition and communication and neurology modules over third year (where there were definitely a fair few questions with massive overlap, and with LD and mental health too as that included dementia and TBI) We've also had a few "half modules" that are only worth five credits but still have loads of work, eg. audiology in second year had an assigment, exam AND a placement observation day?! and a counselling module this year that was really just a huge waste of time and should have been incorporated into the clinical techniques and personal skills modules that we've done so much of over the years...

    In fairness the uni have listened to the feedback and massively streamlined the examination schedule last year so it will be interesting to see how that works out. In second year we had something crazy like nine exams, six assignments, practicals, three short placements that all needed case reports; and third year has been a bit confusing but tended to only have one assignment/exam per module which is good.

    Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love being at Sheffield, the uni and the department are fantastic, staff are lovely and helpful, there are lots of clinics on all the time to get involved with, they are excellent at helping you find additional opportunities and teaching is high quality. I think they just try to cram a lot in, and Sheffield split everything into separate modules, which suits some people and doesn't others. I preferred it because there are areas that I really hate and yet I can still pull up my mark because if I do badly they are worth less IFSWIM. It can just be a bit hectic with five exams upcoming and three assignments due in one week and you're still on placement!
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    (Original post by juliewho)
    Hi Amy, i'm just about to start fourth year now. I think first year was a bit better in terms of clear modules and aims for the year and the modules tended to have equal teaching and just one assignment or exam, then it all went downhill from there and there is SO much repetition from previous years and overlap! We did have a "normal communication" placement in a nursery in first year.

    For example, in second year we diddevelopmental language and it's disorders in first semester - then a module in the second semester on language and aphasia, that was split into two full exams; then this year we did mental health and learning disabilities, even though we had completed our adult learning disability placement (which lots of uni's don't bother with, I was actually in your area for that!) in second year; and this year we are finally getting round to our first acute adult placement just now over summer, after completing cognition and communication and neurology modules over third year (where there were definitely a fair few questions with massive overlap, and with LD and mental health too as that included dementia and TBI) We've also had a few "half modules" that are only worth five credits but still have loads of work, eg. audiology in second year had an assigment, exam AND a placement observation day?! and a counselling module this year that was really just a huge waste of time and should have been incorporated into the clinical techniques and personal skills modules that we've done so much of over the years...

    In fairness the uni have listened to the feedback and massively streamlined the examination schedule last year so it will be interesting to see how that works out. In second year we had something crazy like nine exams, six assignments, practicals, three short placements that all needed case reports; and third year has been a bit confusing but tended to only have one assignment/exam per module which is good.

    Don't get me wrong, I absolutely love being at Sheffield, the uni and the department are fantastic, staff are lovely and helpful, there are lots of clinics on all the time to get involved with, they are excellent at helping you find additional opportunities and teaching is high quality. I think they just try to cram a lot in, and Sheffield split everything into separate modules, which suits some people and doesn't others. I preferred it because there are areas that I really hate and yet I can still pull up my mark because if I do badly they are worth less IFSWIM. It can just be a bit hectic with five exams upcoming and three assignments due in one week and you're still on placement!
    Thanks so much for this - its really interesting to see how each uni takes such a different approach.

    Good luck in your final year
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    (Original post by Smilie789)
    I have an interview next week and I am nervous.Does anyone know the sort of questions they ask?Also are the numeracy and literacy tests hard? any tips/advice? Thanks
    Where for?
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    I really need some advice. I got my results this week and got an A in Bio and Bs in Chem, Geog and General Studies. It's taken till now for me to decide what to apply for and I really want to go for SLaT. I am uncertain that with my grades I would get into the unis that ask for AAB, I have an AS in French. I know there are places still available at Sheffield, Would it be worth going through clearing to try and get one of them if an application next year is unlikely to be successful?

    Just really need some opinions. Thanks
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    (Original post by maverick-01)
    I really need some advice. I got my results this week and got an A in Bio and Bs in Chem, Geog and General Studies. It's taken till now for me to decide what to apply for and I really want to go for SLaT. I am uncertain that with my grades I would get into the unis that ask for AAB, I have an AS in French. I know there are places still available at Sheffield, Would it be worth going through clearing to try and get one of them if an application next year is unlikely to be successful?

    Just really need some opinions. Thanks
    I think you are far more likely to get into Sheffield now if you had grades below their typical offer than if you waited until next year. I think the fact you have a good grade in a second science subject will work in your favour too.

    In the psychology department I used to work in they had a standard offer. But for students who took multiple science subjects they actually gave out lower offers because they knew from experience that 'less academic' people with a science background actually did better on the course than those with relatively better grades in non-science subjects.

    To summarise, you have nothing to lose so contact Sheffield now!
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    (Original post by JFNX)
    Hi Ellice, I remember you from the group interview we had at Newcastle! Well done on getting the grades! 😃
    I'm not sure about a fb group but if I come across one il let you know. Are you from the area or are you moving here? Xx
    hey! Thank you
    I'm moving to Newcastle from the Manchester area, exciting times!xx
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    (Original post by maverick-01)
    I really need some advice. I got my results this week and got an A in Bio and Bs in Chem, Geog and General Studies. It's taken till now for me to decide what to apply for and I really want to go for SLaT. I am uncertain that with my grades I would get into the unis that ask for AAB, I have an AS in French. I know there are places still available at Sheffield, Would it be worth going through clearing to try and get one of them if an application next year is unlikely to be successful?

    Just really need some opinions. Thanks
    With ABB you could easily get into one of the other clearing courses if you wanted too.
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    (Original post by giella)
    Sigh, what would you guys do? I have a deferred place for SaLT at a university that's an hour or more commute from me. I have a young family, including a young baby. My local university also offers the course but they rejected me without interview in the same cycle that I applied to do it at the one I have an offer for.
    I'm torn between taking up this offer and turning it down and starting again on a new application. I don't think I'll find the answer here, but possibly get another perspective. I'd have five weeks to get everything in place. It's a four year commitment and I desperately want to do this. I just don't know whether I could forgive myself if I didn't get another offer. The local university was the only one that didn't offer me an interview and I think they're quite exacting in terms of their standards. I have all the grade requirements and then some, plus years of experience in ESL and special needs, as well as working in a care home. I've done some shadowing work lately of an SLT and I know from that how much I want to do this and how right it is for me. But that's the only thing that's new this time around. I feel like if I give this up now and reapply I may just put myself back at square one or even square zero.
    I don't know what to do. Never felt so torn. I just feel it's going to be so hard when my children are so young.
    We can't make the decision for you, but as someone who's already finished the course and knows how much work is involved, I'll give you some advice.

    Tbh, about 40% of my course were mature students with young children, and a lot of them dropped out due to the increasing workload as the years went on. Take from that what you will.

    You need to ask yourself some questions:
    Are you happy to have a 1 hour + commute every day? And how do you plan to travel? By car, train, bus?
    If you needed to look after your baby, is your current university going to be understanding about you missing lectures/placement?
    Typical SLT workload scenario: you have placement, lecture reading, 2 assignments due soon and a presentation to work on. Are you going to able to do all the preparation and work needed outside of uni time?
    How are you going to feel about leaving your baby to attend lectures/placements all day?
    How would you feel if you turn up the offer?
    How would you feel if you turned down the offer and started a new application?
    If you do turn down the offer, are there any courses you could do to make yourself more appealing to different unis?

    If you can answer these, I think it could help you make your decision.
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    (Original post by PhoenixFortune)
    We can't make the decision for you, but as someone who's already finished the course and knows how much work is involved, I'll give you some advice.

    Tbh, about 40% of my course were mature students with young children, and a lot of them dropped out due to the increasing workload as the years went on. Take from that what you will.

    You need to ask yourself some questions:
    Are you happy to have a 1 hour + commute every day? And how do you plan to travel? By car, train, bus?
    If you needed to look after your baby, is your current university going to be understanding about you missing lectures/placement?
    Typical SLT workload scenario: you have placement, lecture reading, 2 assignments due soon and a presentation to work on. Are you going to able to do all the preparation and work needed outside of uni time?
    How are you going to feel about leaving your baby to attend lectures/placements all day?
    How would you feel if you turn up the offer?
    How would you feel if you turned down the offer and started a new application?
    If you do turn down the offer, are there any courses you could do to make yourself more appealing to different unis?

    If you can answer these, I think it could help you make your decision.
    Thanks Phoenix. That does help a lot in terms of clarifying. With regards to managing the workload that actually doesn't intimidate me that much. I've juggled worse in my current job. I've got a first degree and a postgraduate qualification and my current job is academically rigorous and demanding. My hand is in, so to speak and I'm quite good at getting on with assignments and meeting deadlines as it is. It's not that that worries me.
    Leaving the baby is going to be the hardest thing. I've left my first child and I know I can do it, but one so young? I suppose other women do it. I would find a way I suppose.
    If someone could hand me a place at a preferred university ie. geographically and economically more suitable, I would take it in a heartbeat, without looking back.
    Turning down the offer terrifies me as I'm free-falling into the unknown.
    There probably are some more courses I could take to make myself more attractive, yes. I am aware of some of them and I am actually in the middle of a free course at the moment which I'm following in terms of the reading and discussion. I might restart that one and do it more seriously in terms of the assignments if something does changes. I've been following it out of general interest more than anything else.
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    Hi, I am new to this group chat but I want to ask if anyone is going to City University this year for SLT? I have some great people there and told me it's brilliant course and has the highest rating for student satisfaction. Love the campus too!
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    (Original post by giella)
    Thanks Phoenix. That does help a lot in terms of clarifying. With regards to managing the workload that actually doesn't intimidate me that much. I've juggled worse in my current job. I've got a first degree and a postgraduate qualification and my current job is academically rigorous and demanding. My hand is in, so to speak and I'm quite good at getting on with assignments and meeting deadlines as it is. It's not that that worries me.
    Leaving the baby is going to be the hardest thing. I've left my first child and I know I can do it, but one so young? I suppose other women do it. I would find a way I suppose.
    If someone could hand me a place at a preferred university ie. geographically and economically more suitable, I would take it in a heartbeat, without looking back.
    Turning down the offer terrifies me as I'm free-falling into the unknown.
    There probably are some more courses I could take to make myself more attractive, yes. I am aware of some of them and I am actually in the middle of a free course at the moment which I'm following in terms of the reading and discussion. I might restart that one and do it more seriously in terms of the assignments if something does changes. I've been following it out of general interest more than anything else.
    I have a similar background to you and was in a similar situation too. I was rejected from my local university two years ago. I decided to reapply the following year instead of moving my girlfriend and young daughter to a new part of the country which we did not know. In the grand scheme of things this worked out well for me because I used the year well but I still obviously did not know whether I would get an offer or ultimately meet my conditional offer (Newcastle wanted me to take a biology course).

    Before I started my course this year I actually worked at the university so I was used to the commute (1.5 hours each way on bus) and knew I would spend less time travelling overall so that was not an issue for me really. I also knew where the university could realistically send me on placement. I live in a rural area so I think this will work in my favour as there are some places I just will not be able to go to given the distances and times involved. But for the young girls who will be living in the centre of Newcastle I have no doubt that they will be forced to get on trains to reach far-flung places simply because they have better transport facilities close by. On the other hand if I was put somewhere far out then I am quite prepared to stay overnight and I do not see this as a problem (barring the short-term financial implications) as it would let me get stuck into the placement properly. But I could only do this because I have a girlfriend who could look after our daughter in the evening. You never mentioned whether you had a partner or whether you have anyone that could support you.

    The worst aspect of the course as far as having a family is concerned is the 'examination periods'. One of my friends with two older children dropped out after Christmas because she got sick of having to tell her children to leave her alone while she did work. I have had to do the same with my own daughter and know it sucks especially when they are young. There are positives though. You get the summer free which you could spend with them.

    Another issue I have had is the fact these sorts of courses run students into the ground. Most staff do not really seem to care about workload - even those with children themselves - and think it is some rite of passage students have to go to or something which prepares them for work later on (e.g. I remember the university saying that almost every student failed at least module in first year as if it was something to be proud of rather than contemplating that the workload might actually be too much?). Like it was a sign the course was rigorous or something.
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    I must say that having read the recent comments by evantej and PhoenixFortune I am feeling more than a little apprehensive as someone due to start year 1. I was wondering if any other existing students out there could offer any positive comments or advice. Thanks
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    (Original post by shropshirelass51)
    I must say that having read the recent comments by evantej and PhoenixFortune I am feeling more than a little apprehensive as someone due to start year 1. I was wondering if any other existing students out there could offer any positive comments or advice. Thanks
    I second that feeling! I've gone from excited to anxious! In particular any current BCU students input would be much appreciated 😀 thanks
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    (Original post by fayeowen90)
    I second that feeling! I've gone from excited to anxious! In particular any current BCU students input would be much appreciated 😀 thanks
    Have sent you a PM
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    (Original post by fayeowen90)
    I second that feeling! I've gone from excited to anxious! In particular any current BCU students input would be much appreciated 😀 thanks
    Same here, even though I'm a school leaver not a 'mature' student! I knew the course was going to be a great challenge, but I am quite a bit more apprehensive now!!
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    Hi

    MMU student - going into second year in September.

    Not much direct help to BCU new starters sorry but will offer some of my experiences.

    The timetable is more full than an ordinary degree but is not as packed as I was expecting (during interview they made it sound like Monday to Friday 9-5 - its not). My timetable has not been consistent throughout the year - it has varied from term to term.

    Work-wise first term was very manageable - it got hectic from Feb-May with deadlines for assignments, placement and exams. My advice is not to leave anything till too close to hand in deadlines - keep on top of the assignments (do early if you can - so that deadlines don't run in to each other!)

    We have a lot of mature students (sorry I am only 19!) and they have families of various ages - no-one has dropped out to date because of the workload - some even manage a job in addition to the course and family (though these people do get more stressed/feel the pressure than those without jobs and/or family)..

    The content at times has been confusing when you are trying to do an assignment whilst still in the middle of relevant lectures so a bit of fumbling around in the dark ensues but it all comes out right in the end. During theses times the group pulls together and you work through it together. Mutual support has been great.

    There is a lot to take in and everyone has their strengths and weakness but its very very interesting

    If you want to know anything else then please ask

    Oh yeah - and don't worry/panic
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    (Original post by shropshirelass51)
    I must say that having read the recent comments by evantej and PhoenixFortune I am feeling more than a little apprehensive as someone due to start year 1. I was wondering if any other existing students out there could offer any positive comments or advice. Thanks
    Hi! I'm just about to start second year at Strathclyde, and like Amy, I haven't found the course too unreasonable. As long as you do the notes and assignments when you get them you will be fine - placement is always a bit hectic but just stay on top of it and you will get there as for overlap, I've found sometimes that that can be helpful in gaining a deeper understanding of a particular area, or making connections between things. Obviously that is dependent on the university, but they're not out there to make you fail - a higher pass rate is better for them! As long as you are passionate and work consistently, you will be fine


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