Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by H1998)
    I'm currently studying Psychology, sociology and law, but i'm thinking of taking up AS biology as it may appeal to the universities more. As well as completing work experience during the October half term. I've thought about BCU, City, reading so far. But what appeals universities, from what I've read some of those who have applied don't receive an even if they meet the requirements?
    I found during the application process that a lot of unis look for students who generally just show an interest in the field - who understand what the course/profession entails, the skills that are needed etc. Reading into and around the subject is something that tends to be emphasised a lot - particularly as work experience in the field isn't the easiest thing to come across!!!

    But every uni does look for something different in candidates, and tend to have different decision-making systems. Some applicants might get a straight rejection from one uni, but are accepted by another because their systems/focuses are so different!

    And SLT is definitely a course that requires more than just 'the grades'. As a vocational subject, it's important for the unis to 'pick' (sorry, that word sounds degrading) students who possess the skills and mindset that are needed for a SLT career!

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by H1998)
    I'm currently studying Psychology, sociology and law, but i'm thinking of taking up AS biology as it may appeal to the universities more. As well as completing work experience during the October half term. I've thought about BCU, City, reading so far. But what appeals universities, from what I've read some of those who have applied don't receive an even if they meet the requirements?
    Psychology and sociology will be looked on favourably (they are usually on the list of preferred subjects - I did both of these too). Biology AS would be useful - a further option might be English language if you didn't want to do biology.

    I didn't apply to any of your choices - I applied to the more northern unis as I live in the north west. City used to have the highest entry requirements but it is a larger course and is often in clearing. Birmingham have lower grade requirements (hence often ends up as insurance choice if people are lucky enough to get more than one offer). Reading used to do a written interview sent to your home whereas most other unis insist on personal attendance at interview days (which usually include a written aspect).

    As someone else has said each uni seems to have different criteria but usually if you meet their entry requirements exam wise and have a decent PS that shows evidence of true interest you will usually get an invite to interview - after that is anyone's guess as to whether you will get an offer. Its a long drawn out process so be warned. Watched my friends just getting offers when I was still attending interviews - its not easy.

    Good luck
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by H1998)
    I'm currently studying Psychology, sociology and law, but i'm thinking of taking up AS biology as it may appeal to the universities more. As well as completing work experience during the October half term. I've thought about BCU, City, reading so far. But what appeals universities, from what I've read some of those who have applied don't receive an even if they meet the requirements?
    Hi, I applied to both City and Reading and am off to Reading in September. If the course doesn't ask for a specific a level, which neither City or Reading do, then don't worry about picking an extra one up. If you want to do Biology because your interested then go for it, but universities only tend to care if your planning on taking it onto A2. And its better to get 3 amazing a levels then 3 good a levels and an AS. If that makes sense?

    So onto what appeals, again it depends on the university. But a good personal statement that shows that you have researched into SLT, that you know your potential clients, the disorders you'll be working with etc. And thats shows your passionate. Some good traits to emphasise, are good problem solving skills, good communication, compassionate and resilient.

    But from the sounds of it you'll do great, you've got some varied a levels which shows a well rounded student and you've got your work experience which will be really helpful come university interviews. Good Luck
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by AmyPilot)
    Psychology and sociology will be looked on favourably (they are usually on the list of preferred subjects - I did both of these too). Biology AS would be useful - a further option might be English language if you didn't want to do biology.

    I didn't apply to any of your choices - I applied to the more northern unis as I live in the north west. City used to have the highest entry requirements but it is a larger course and is often in clearing. Birmingham have lower grade requirements (hence often ends up as insurance choice if people are lucky enough to get more than one offer). Reading used to do a written interview sent to your home whereas most other unis insist on personal attendance at interview days (which usually include a written aspect).

    As someone else has said each uni seems to have different criteria but usually if you meet their entry requirements exam wise and have a decent PS that shows evidence of true interest you will usually get an invite to interview - after that is anyone's guess as to whether you will get an offer. Its a long drawn out process so be warned. Watched my friends just getting offers when I was still attending interviews - its not easy.

    Good luck
    Sorry if you don't mind me asking what alevels did you study? And do you what the difference was between you and your friends personal statement?(basically as to why you got an offer way before your friends). And thankyou for explaining about the different unis, I would definitely apply to Manchester uni but I've read that it's quite strict during the process?
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by anomea)
    Hi, I applied to both City and Reading and am off to Reading in September. If the course doesn't ask for a specific a level, which neither City or Reading do, then don't worry about picking an extra one up. If you want to do Biology because your interested then go for it, but universities only tend to care if your planning on taking it onto A2. And its better to get 3 amazing a levels then 3 good a levels and an AS. If that makes sense?

    So onto what appeals, again it depends on the university. But a good personal statement that shows that you have researched into SLT, that you know your potential clients, the disorders you'll be working with etc. And thats shows your passionate. Some good traits to emphasise, are good problem solving skills, good communication, compassionate and resilient.

    But from the sounds of it you'll do great, you've got some varied a levels which shows a well rounded student and you've got your work experience which will be really helpful come university interviews. Good Luck
    Sorry you don't mind me asking what alevels you studied and what unis did you apply to? What was the process like when applying and after receiving offers? Thank you
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by H1998)
    Sorry if you don't mind me asking what alevels did you study? And do you what the difference was between you and your friends personal statement?(basically as to why you got an offer way before your friends). And thankyou for explaining about the different unis, I would definitely apply to Manchester uni but I've read that it's quite strict during the process?
    I did psychology, sociology, English lit/lang and RS at A level.

    My friends all got offers before me as they applied for more usual degrees (English Psychology etc) and they didn't have to endure interviews and the long drawn out process that SLT involves.

    I got an offer from Uni of Manchester but opted for MMU instead (was lucky to get on the last intake for a joint honours course speech therapy and psychology). Think wherever you apply its a strict process its never just "oh do you have the grades and a good PS". I also applied to Leeds and Sheffield.

    One thing I will say though - going for interviews means you get a better feel for which unis you prefer as when you get there each uni approaches the course differently.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by H1998)
    Sorry you don't mind me asking what alevels you studied and what unis did you apply to? What was the process like when applying and after receiving offers? Thank you
    I took Psychology, History and RS and did AS in Biology in Year 12.
    I applied to Reading, UEA, City, DMU and Uni of Manchester, and got offers from all but the last.

    So City application was the easiest I sent my application off in October and got an offer February time, they don't do any interviews and rely more on academics.
    With Reading you apply and they send you an email saying if you got through the first round, then you get a sort of essay like questionnaire, you have plenty of time to fill this in, so take your time. I then got my offer December time.

    The other 3 all have interviews, for Manchester this is written, where your given 45 minutes to do two essay questions. You are then given your offer/ rejection within a month.
    For UEA you have to do an 1 hour maths and literacy exam. Then you get sent into the interview room in a group of 5. You have 5 minute interviews with 5 different people, one being a service user. This was by far my most intimidating interview so just be prepared if you apply for UEA. (However, UEA is the only uni that may give you an unconditional offer, which takes the pressure off exams)
    DMU has a similar interview process where you have to go to 5 rooms, in each room 2 people will ask 2 questions.

    Overall the process is long and expensive with all the travelling, most of your friends will have all their offers by December, I didn't get my last one till April. But the interview process gives you a great opportunity to get a feel for the uni, as most of the interviewing staff will be your lecturers. And you get to meet other people that may be joining you on your course
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by H1998)
    Sorry if you don't mind me asking what alevels did you study? And do you what the difference was between you and your friends personal statement?(basically as to why you got an offer way before your friends). And thankyou for explaining about the different unis, I would definitely apply to Manchester uni but I've read that it's quite strict during the process?
    Hi, I go to Manchester and I must say that the interview process wasn't that bad at all. We didn't have a face to face interview which can be very daunting for some people. We had a small presentation for the introduction and had to do a maths and english test online. I did Psychology, English Language and Health Studies at A Level. I actually picked up AS Biology during my second year but found it far too difficult to keep up with the work load for my other subjects and decided that no universities would expect me to have AS Biology, but for some universities it might be a preferred subject. You would just have to check but personally I think your subject options sound fine.

    If you've got any more questions about Manchester then feel free to ask
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I haven't been on here in a while but I hope everyone got the results they were hoping for! So who is heading to the University of Manchester in September? I am going into my second year so feel free to ask me anything about Manchester
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by gscott10)
    I haven't been on here in a while but I hope everyone got the results they were hoping for! So who is heading to the University of Manchester in September? I am going into my second year so feel free to ask me anything about Manchester
    Hello stranger! Take it the exams went ok then - we were just about to start them all last time we "spoke". Can't believe its almost time to start year 2!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Hi everyone,
    Just wondering if anyone else is going to the uni of Manchester this September for SLT? Thanks xx
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Hey!

    Firstly, congratulations to those who have got their results and places on the course! If you haven't, there are alternatives, so don't give up.

    I've just been trying to catch up on all that's been said on here! I'd just like to say, as someone who has completed first year, that yes, it is a demanding course - but I wouldn't say first year has been much more difficult than A levels in someways (academically). It's demanding in a sense that it encourages you to develop as a person, and makes you question some of your views on subjects and can help you be more open minded. Although I'm a bit nervous to go into second year (where we go on placement in October), it's all a learning process, and no one expects you to be some sort of perfect SLT yet - in fact they never will do, you'll always be learning, adapting, and developing as a person and a professional throughout the career!

    I wish I had enjoyed my first year a bit more and not stressed so much, it's really not worth it. If you put in the effort, you'll find you reap the rewards - it is a very rewarding course

    If anyone has any questions about first year at BCU, please feel free to ask
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by saraw26)
    Hey!

    Firstly, congratulations to those who have got their results and places on the course! If you haven't, there are alternatives, so don't give up.

    I've just been trying to catch up on all that's been said on here! I'd just like to say, as someone who has completed first year, that yes, it is a demanding course - but I wouldn't say first year has been much more difficult than A levels in someways (academically). It's demanding in a sense that it encourages you to develop as a person, and makes you question some of your views on subjects and can help you be more open minded. Although I'm a bit nervous to go into second year (where we go on placement in October), it's all a learning process, and no one expects you to be some sort of perfect SLT yet - in fact they never will do, you'll always be learning, adapting, and developing as a person and a professional throughout the career!

    I wish I had enjoyed my first year a bit more and not stressed so much, it's really not worth it. If you put in the effort, you'll find you reap the rewards - it is a very rewarding course

    If anyone has any questions about first year at BCU, please feel free to ask
    Hi, and thank you for your offering to help us 'newbies'! Roughly when can we realistically expect to receive our enrolment email from BCU, and what exactly can we expect to do at the Welcome Week? I'm in two minds about attending, but only because i'll have to really switch up childcare for that week? TIA for any reply!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JaaySLT)
    Hi, and thank you for your offering to help us 'newbies'! Roughly when can we realistically expect to receive our enrolment email from BCU, and what exactly can we expect to do at the Welcome Week? I'm in two minds about attending, but only because i'll have to really switch up childcare for that week? TIA for any reply!
    I had my email at the end of the week for online enrolment, but expect this is the start of the list as my surname is a 'B'. I'm sure yours will come through soon - just keep an eye out for email stating with 'srs.enrolment'...The process is easier than I dreaded and didn't take as long as they said!.

    Worth noting though is that we have to enrol on campus on Sunday 20th Sept. I wasn't expecting this and the times are according to alphabet (A-B starting at 9am!).

    No details about Welcome Week yet, though...

    Looking forward to meeting everyone soon!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    I am looking to start university in 2016, I was planning on doing a childhood studies degree course for three years and then a postgraduate degree for two years in speech and language therapy. any advice?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pastagirl)
    I am looking to start university in 2016, I was planning on doing a childhood studies degree course for three years and then a postgraduate degree for two years in speech and language therapy. any advice?
    I'd say in all honesty that you could be wasting your time and money. First, the postgraduate route is fiercely competitive and a large proportion of the people who apply for that route end up on an undergraduate route anyway, so it's not the most financially viable plan. Second, there's talk of funding being cut for these courses and the general advice would be to make hay while the sun shines. Third, if you know this is what you want to do then you really don't need to do another degree first and there is always the option of doing a Master's degree later in something that interests you at considerably less cost and time.

    Finally, your choice of degree may not be a facilitator. MMU's Master's route for example specifies a degree in psychology and favour is given to degrees in the straight biological or psychological sciences for many other courses.

    I'm not saying that what you're proposing isn't viable because it is, but I would say you're delaying unnecessarily. If you're proposing this because you don't think your A levels will be good enough, just be aware that meeting the minimum standard of a 2:1 degree is not guaranteed and then you'd cut yourself out of the running all together, so it's not necessarily a good roundabout route in either. I just don't think it's particularly sound as a plan going forward. A route in retrospect maybe, but not a good roadmap. I'd concentrate on getting your A levels up to standard if this is what you are concerned about now.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by giella)
    I'd say in all honesty that you could be wasting your time and money. First, the postgraduate route is fiercely competitive and a large proportion of the people who apply for that route end up on an undergraduate route anyway, so it's not the most financially viable plan. Second, there's talk of funding being cut for these courses and the general advice would be to make hay while the sun shines. Third, if you know this is what you want to do then you really don't need to do another degree first and there is always the option of doing a Master's degree later in something that interests you at considerably less cost and time.

    Finally, your choice of degree may not be a facilitator. MMU's Master's route for example specifies a degree in psychology and favour is given to degrees in the straight biological or psychological sciences for many other courses.

    I'm not saying that what you're proposing isn't viable because it is, but I would say you're delaying unnecessarily. If you're proposing this because you don't think your A levels will be good enough, just be aware that meeting the minimum standard of a 2:1 degree is not guaranteed and then you'd cut yourself out of the running all together, so it's not necessarily a good roundabout route in either. I just don't think it's particularly sound as a plan going forward. A route in retrospect maybe, but not a good roadmap. I'd concentrate on getting your A levels up to standard if this is what you are concerned about now.
    Thank you for replying when i looked at undergraduate courses in speech and language therapy the requirements are 3 alevels however i am doing 2 alevels and a BTEC, also lots of universities want biology and psychology which i don't have (i decided i wanted to do speech therapy after picking my alevel subjects).
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pastagirl)
    Thank you for replying when i looked at undergraduate courses in speech and language therapy the requirements are 3 alevels however i am doing 2 alevels and a BTEC, also lots of universities want biology and psychology which i don't have (i decided i wanted to do speech therapy after picking my alevel subjects).
    I would contact the universities and ask them what they would advise. An access course might be best suited to you I would say at this stage though.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by giella)
    I would contact the universities and ask them what they would advise. An access course might be best suited to you I would say at this stage though.
    whats an access course?
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by pastagirl)
    whats an access course?
    Many colleges offer an Access to Higher Education with specific pathways for humanities, sciences and healthcare/nursing. These are one year diplomas, which universities consider on an individual basis for each student. They used to be for mature students but they're increasingly taken up by students who want to convert to a different pathway but don't want to take another 2 years of A levels.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: May 7, 2016
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.