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    (Original post by plumpOlhenry)
    Every 1 look at wheat fam
    What do we even need to know about this so confused..
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    (Original post by buxtonarmy)
    link pls
    haha sorry http://us22.chatzy.com/94903706046868
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    the link to the f215 chat is http://us22.chatzy.com/94903706046868
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    (Original post by buxtonarmy)
    Did you pull off a C4 all nighter??
    I got less than 4hours sleep last night for c4 which I think worked out well in the end. One final push and it's all over.
    (Original post by domcandrews)
    Same man, how did you find c4? and what board you doing for maths?
    OCR for maths. It went pretty well, so I'm hoping to gorge off the energy from doing well in that for the rest of the night
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    (Original post by domcandrews)
    Looks quite accurate to me, apoptosis and meiosis QWC would be ideal, labelling/functions of brain looks likely too
    Ahh mate, if there was a QWC on meiosis and apoptosis, i would literally cry lol, hope there is, iA.
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    Timber management guys? Could someone simplify it into bullet points for me please? I would be soo grateful!! Cheers!
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    (Original post by sciencegeeks)
    What do we even need to know about this so confused..
    Basically, there was wheat, and it crossed with a grass, and was sterile
    Then it had a chromosome mutation and became fertile
    Then it was bred with other species of wheat to produce another fertile hybrid, it was fertile cos it had an uneven no of chromosomes so it couldn't pair
    It then went through another chromosome mutation where it doubled no. of chromosomes, so it became fertile again
    Further gene mutation lead to modern bread wheat
    Recently, other genes have been added eg. disease resistant
    And now they're continuously breeding for best yield etc etc all that artificial selection

    thats the story of wheat
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    (Original post by sciencegeeks)
    What do we even need to know about this so confused..
    U need to know about how the chromosome number for common wheat is 6n and that it under went hybridisation. Mad fam
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    (Original post by hermiones)
    Basically, there was wheat, and it crossed with a grass, and was sterile<br />
    Then it had a chromosome mutation and became fertile<br />
    Then it was bred with other species of wheat to produce another fertile hybrid, it was fertile cos it had an uneven no of chromosomes so it couldn't pair<br />
    It then went through another chromosome mutation where it doubled no. of chromosomes, so it became fertile again<br />
    Further gene mutation lead to modern bread wheat<br />
    Recently, other genes have been added eg. disease resistant <br />
    And now they're continuously breeding for best yield etc etc all that artificial selection<br />
    <br />
    thats the story of wheat
    I do not understand why this isn't in my book in the slightest
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    (Original post by bakedbeans247)
    Ahh mate, if there was a QWC on meiosis and apoptosis, i would literally cry lol, hope there is, iA.
    Yeh surely they've got to put it in one year or another? Then again can never predict with these OCR pricks
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    What kind of things do you think theyd ask about meiosis?? Its so long
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    (Original post by ChoccyPhilly)
    I got less than 4hours sleep last night for c4 which I think worked out well in the end. One final push and it's all over.


    OCR for maths. It went pretty well, so I'm hoping to gorge off the energy from doing well in that for the rest of the night
    That's good! Might get a bit more sleep tonight so I'm actually awake for the exam and don't fall asleep
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    That link looks a little dodgy......
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    (Original post by Mansour)
    The ones for epistatsim, but you can work it out from the punnett square
    Yeah its just the questions where theres no punnett swaure and you're expected to know what the predicted ratio for this type of epistasis is. Yeh becomes obvious when it's a punnett square. Many thanks
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    (Original post by domcandrews)
    Yeh surely they've got to put it in one year or another? Then again can never predict with these OCR pricks
    loooooooooool
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    (Original post by thequackingduck)
    Why is sterile air entered into fermentation vessels rather than normal air?
    you need aseptic conditions to prevent contamination (presence of unwanted micro-organism)
    Presence of unwanted organisms results in
    -competion for nutrients and space
    - may produce toxic products that destroy cultured organism or the product
    so results in reduced yield of desired product
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    How can there be so much content in one exam 😭😭😭😭😭😭😭😭


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    (Original post by baymax96)
    so emotionally drained bc of this exam my body can't take anymore
    same here and then i just keep finding more things i dont know about then have to stay up longer to do alll the work
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    (Original post by bakedbeans247)
    Timber management guys? Could someone simplify it into bullet points for me please? I would be soo grateful!! Cheers!
    SMALL SCALE
    Coppicing - cutting a tree close to the ground to encourage new growth, whilst keeping it alive - sustainable. It regrows new shoots over and over to be used

    Pollarding - similar to coppicing, but higher up on the tree eg, branches - used when there are lots of deer as the deer eat the growing shoots from coppiced trees so it takes a while to grow back (when it's cut higher they can't reach it)

    ROTATIONAL coppicing - dividing woodland into sections and only cutting from that section once a year, until they've all been cut - this means that the ones from the beginning are ready to be cut again as they've left them to grow. Good for biodiversity - different woodland areas provide different habitats (different amounts of light in woodland in diff areas), so biodiversity is larger


    LARGER SCALE
    Selective cutting - removing only largest, most valuable trees so habitat isn't affected much

    Clear-felling - cutting down ALL the trees in one area at one time - rare in UK, leaves soil susceptible to erosion, soil can run off into waterways and pollute them because there are no trees to protect
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    How do you know if dominant epistasis is 13:3 or 12:3:1
    Recessive epistasis 9:3:4 - recessive allele is doing the suppressing
    Dominant epistasis 13:3 - dominant allele is doing the suppressing
    Complementary epistasis 9:7 - work in complementary fashion with intermediate
 
 
 
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