Tv reception at Warwick Watch

estel
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#21
Report 9 years ago
#21
(Original post by Miss_Scarlet)
technically not.
I watch coronation street for example. You can watch their live streaming thing on their website and can watch the show at the same time that it would be shown on a television. But you can only do that from inside the UK.
Technically you do need a TV license for this, and you're certainly liable if you watch the live stream and don't have a license (at least, insofar as there exists liability with this issue). But you're quite able to watch it without one: only at your own risk.

(Original post by kitty123)
oooo brilliant i take it you need a tv license to watch them?
Legally need, yes.
Do most people who watch it at uni have one? No.
0
reply
estel
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#22
Report 9 years ago
#22
(Original post by TheTallOne)
But a contention ratio of 50:1 with a 2Mbps = 40kbps at the worst case. Horrible.

Unless 50 of us are sharing a 100Mbps connection, in which case I will be happy.
Surely most home ADSL connections operate at 8Mbps, at a contention ratio of 50:1? Yet you don't tend to have a problem with the implied bandwidth here.

I can't remember people last year really reporting huge problems, and I was generally able to watch internet streams/iplayer etc.
0
reply
TheTallOne
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#23
Report 9 years ago
#23
(Original post by TMDaines)


For that to be the case every single person who shares that connection would need to use the entirety of their bandwith, which in this case is literally thousands.
But even if 3 people are on the lowest bitrate on iPlayer (~750kbps), then in total this will exceed the 2Mbps connection.
0
reply
p3t3y
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#24
Report 9 years ago
#24
(Original post by j_owen90)
Apparently even with a booster aerial it's pretty rubbish. Of course, I don't know for certain but I seem to remember being told... Looks like my 'Neighbours' addiction may suffer!
omg I LOVE NEIGHBOURS!!!! :woo:

i saw "digital indoor aerials" in home bas the other day - anyone know if they are any better than the normal ones???

(Original post by estel)
I highly recommend http://www.tvcatchup.com for all non-BBC shows
seriously fantastic link!! [+REP]
0
reply
TMDaines
Badges: 0
#25
Report 9 years ago
#25
(Original post by TheTallOne)
But even if 3 people are on the lowest bitrate on iPlayer (~750kbps), then in total this will exceed the 2Mbps connection.
Can you re-read my posts again please? The contention ratio does not mean that there are y people sharing a single line. A contention ratio of 50:1 on a 2Mb line does not mean that there are 50 exact people sharing one specific 2 Mb line. Think about how fractions can be displayed:

50:1
100:2
150:3
...
1000:20

The contention ratio in this case just implies in a worse case scenario, which rarely [read: never] happens, that you would be sharing 2Mb with 49 other people.
0
reply
TheTallOne
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#26
Report 9 years ago
#26
(Original post by TMDaines)
Can you re-read my posts again please? The contention ratio does not mean that there are y people sharing a single line. A contention ratio of 50:1 on a 2Mb line does not mean that there are 50 exact people sharing one specific line. Think about how fractions can be displayed:

50:1
100:2
150:3
...
1000:20
Bah, I was under the impression that exactly 50 rooms are connected and isolated off.
0
reply
Miss_Scarlet
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#27
Report 9 years ago
#27
(Original post by TMDaines)
No you're wrong sorry . You need a licence to watch or record TV as it is being broadcast or simulcast. That's regardless of whether you are watching that broadcast on a TV, a mobile phone, a laptop etc.

http://iplayerhelp.external.bbc.co.u...ayer/tvlicence

So watching Coronation Street on your PC via the internet at the same time it is being broadcast (live) is illegal.
It doesn't say that. Normally, you get warnings and it certainly doesn't have any :-)
0
reply
TheTallOne
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#28
Report 9 years ago
#28
(Original post by TMDaines)
Can you re-read my posts again please?
Just did.

Saw your edit on the last post on the first page :ninja:

Though my skim reading and my impression from what I had before made me post hastily. I guess you needed to spell it out to me
0
reply
estel
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#29
Report 9 years ago
#29
(Original post by Miss_Scarlet)
It doesn't say that. Normally, you get warnings and it certainly doesn't have any :-)
Where/what are you talking about? :s

(Original post by BBC)
Anyone in the UK watching or recording television as it's being broadcast or simulcast on any device - including mobiles, laptops and PCs - must, by law, be covered by a valid TV licence.

A 'live' TV programme is a programme, which is watched or recorded at the same time (or virtually the same time) as it is being broadcast or otherwise distributed to members of the public. As a general rule, if a person is watching a programme on a computer or other device at the same time as it is being shown on TV then the programme is 'live'. This is sometimes known as simulcasting.
That isn't particularly vague!
0
reply
Wraggy
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#30
Report 9 years ago
#30
(Original post by TMDaines)
No you're wrong sorry . You need a licence to watch or record TV as it is being broadcast or simulcast. That's regardless of whether you are watching that broadcast on a TV, a mobile phone, a laptop etc.

http://iplayerhelp.external.bbc.co.u...ayer/tvlicence

So watching Coronation Street on your PC via the internet at the same time it is being broadcast (live) is illegal.
Actually, you are not 100% correct:
Your parents' TV Licence won't cover your use of any TV receiver in student accommodation, except in the following rare and limited circumstances:

* You only use TV receiving equipment that is powered by its internal batteries; and
* You have not installed it (e.g. connected it to an aerial or plugged it into the mains) to receive TV; and
* Your permanent address (non term-time) is your parents' home; and
* Your parents have a valid TV Licence for their home.
From http://www.tvlicensing.co.uk/information/students.jsp

So from my interpretation of the law, if you unplug your laptop from the mains while watching iPlayer, you are covered by your parents TV license (I guess you my argue plugging your ethernet cable in comes under the second bullet point, but using a wireless connection there are no issues as far as I can see)

More on topic, I was in westwood last year, and the aerial socket in the common room was perfectly fine for all digital channels.
0
reply
TMDaines
Badges: 0
#31
Report 9 years ago
#31
(Original post by Wraggy)
Actually, you are not 100% correct:
Sure, I am aware of that, but that wasn't relevent to the point that was being discussed i.e. whether you need to be licenced to watch a live TV stream being broadcast over the internet. Whose licence covers you is irrelevent but you need to be licenced all the same!
0
reply
calcium878
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#32
Report 9 years ago
#32
I would only bother getting a licence if you have a proper TV - I'm assuming everybody's parents have a licence and let's face it, these people need a warrant to search your room. They sent me (and everyone else in my hall) about a dozen 'threatening' letters last year; but if you read them properly they have no power at all.

I hate this ******* government and the TV licence anyway.
0
reply
TMDaines
Badges: 0
#33
Report 9 years ago
#33
(Original post by calcium878)
I would only bother getting a licence if you have a proper TV - I'm assuming everybody's parents have a licence and let's face it, these people need a warrant to search your room. They sent me (and everyone else in my hall) about a dozen 'threatening' letters last year; but if you read them properly they have no power at all.

I hate this ******* government and the TV licence anyway.
... but yeh, I'm doing the same!
0
reply
estel
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#34
Report 9 years ago
#34
(Original post by calcium878)
I would only bother getting a licence if you have a proper TV - I'm assuming everybody's parents have a licence and let's face it, these people need a warrant to search your room. They sent me (and everyone else in my hall) about a dozen 'threatening' letters last year; but if you read them properly they have no power at all.

I hate this ******* government and the TV licence anyway.
Whilst this may be true off campus, I believe that on campus the terms of your accommodation and Warwick policy means that Accommodation may allow TV Licensing into halls without one.
0
reply
calcium878
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#35
Report 9 years ago
#35
(Original post by estel)
Whilst this may be true off campus, I believe that on campus the terms of your accommodation and Warwick policy means that Accommodation may allow TV Licensing into halls without one.
Yeah, but they still have no right to enter your room AFAIK, without prior notice.
0
reply
jk1986
Badges: 0
Rep:
?
#36
Report 9 years ago
#36
(Original post by calcium878)
Yeah, but they still have no right to enter your room AFAIK, without prior notice.
Yeah they'll need to get a search order first, and to get that they have to prove to a judge that they have reason to believe you're watching live TV without a licence..
0
reply
calcium878
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#37
Report 9 years ago
#37
(Original post by jk1986)
Yeah they'll need to get a search order first, and to get that they have to prove to a judge that they have reason to believe you're watching live TV without a licence..
Exactly. I'd like to see them do that to 6000 students on campus.

I really hope people take my advice onboard and ignore these letters!
0
reply
estel
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#38
Report 9 years ago
#38
(Original post by jk1986)
Yeah they'll need to get a search order first, and to get that they have to prove to a judge that they have reason to believe you're watching live TV without a licence..
I don't think that this is true. The terms for Warwick accommodation say that they are permitted to enter your room if you give them more than 24 hours notice. I believe that the University would use this clause to allow TV Licensing (who they have said they will cooperate fully with) to look around your room.
0
reply
calcium878
Badges: 16
Rep:
?
#39
Report 9 years ago
#39
(Original post by estel)
I don't think that this is true. The terms for Warwick accommodation say that they are permitted to enter your room if you give them more than 24 hours notice. I believe that the University would use this clause to allow TV Licensing (who they have said they will cooperate fully with) to look around your room.
Yes, ok, but the point is they can't just march in. 24 hours is more than long enough to unplug your laptop from the mains (sufficient to be complying with the law) or taking other steps to cover-up your watching.
0
reply
estel
Badges: 17
Rep:
?
#40
Report 9 years ago
#40
(Original post by calcium878)
Yes, ok, but the point is they can't just march in. 24 hours is more than long enough to unplug your laptop from the mains (sufficient to be complying with the law) or taking other steps to cover-up your watching.
Well yes . And I believe that they'd actually have to catch you in the act of watching internet TV whilst the laptop was plugged into the mains.

Though to be fair, they wouldn't necessarily tell you that they were entering because of TV Licensing.
0
reply
X

Quick Reply

Attached files
Write a reply...
Reply
new posts
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise

University open days

  • University of Warwick
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Fri, 21 Jun '19
  • University of Warwick
    Undergraduate Open Day Undergraduate
    Sat, 22 Jun '19

Have you registered to vote?

Yes! (515)
37.56%
No - but I will (107)
7.8%
No - I don't want to (93)
6.78%
No - I can't vote (<18, not in UK, etc) (656)
47.85%

Watched Threads

View All
Latest
My Feed

See more of what you like on
The Student Room

You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

Personalise