Cosmo quiz for banking Watch

LegallyBlonde2.0
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#21
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Haz313
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#22
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(Original post by uthinkilltellu)
I haven't read anything you wrote above for fear of brain damage, but I will comment on the stuff you've bolded, at a cost of some measly 2 billion brain cells.

Travel experience breaks the standrad monotony of the typical interview and just may be the only ray of sunshine the interviewer will get from the current batch of interns. She'll probably spend more time on travelling than on any other part of the CV because travelling is one of the things that not only differentiates candidates but also leads to a number of good competency examples. Also, travelling is what interesting people talk about, as opposed to blathering on about drawing candkesticks.

ECs are even more intergral than travelling. People might be right in that these positions offer nothing tangible, but the overriding factors are that (i) positions of responsibility are another key differentiator. Thousands of people get screened by the recruiters, and whereas pretty much all of them will have top uni and AAA+ (which is why I think so low of it) only the very few can be presidents or treasurers simply because a society can have one president and one treasurer and there finine number of societies, and (ii) these positions of power are a popularity contest. Only people with friends, who are prepared to waste their time in an AGM for that someone, win. That's a fact. Never ever did I see anything to the contrary, and as part of the union steering commitee I've been involved in a lot of AGMs. These people must be doing something right if they have so many friends (i.e. charismatic, funny, etc.) and banks want their client facing staff to have these skills which is why ECs are so important. They do not want people who spend most of their time talking about trading and drawing candlesticks to highlight their madness.
I actually love you.
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uthinkilltellu
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#23
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(Original post by LegallyBlonde2.0)
I mentioned candlesticks on this forum once and from now on I'll be the candlesticks girl? lol

If travelling is the only CV item that differentiates you from others then you've a problem.

You can demonstrate teamwork skills, commitment...etc by other activities, not necessarily by chasing balls or running around in places with others or alone...
What is your differentiating factor, secretary at BNPP?

(Original post by LegallyBlonde2.0)
This is exactly the blah blah blah interpretation of a simple free time activity.

The same as " I wanted to walk across the road with my friends yesterday and had to make decisions in a split second on when to make the first steps while there were 4-7 cars twice your size trying to get to you. I am very committed and I practice road crossing everyday. Crossing road with friends is basically a very complicated game of chess but with pressure. I also learned how to work/move in a team.
Give me an internship place."

You can inflate any activity to sound relevant to ib but HR and MDs see through this easily. At company presentations/dinners last year HR and professionals (IBers, traders, structurers) couldn't care less when guys like these came with their travel/sport achievement stories.
Candlesticks, eh? Riveting stuff. On the dinners I've been to, and I've been to very few, MDs talked mostly about themselves with some small talk about cricket.
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ElemenT'
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#24
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(Original post by texex)
Sports is actually one of the best EC's you can have. Of course I am not talking about the person who plays football twice a week with friends, but actual commitment. In general, if you play competitively it shows you can play in a team, be motivated, work hard etc etc. Then there is also the specifics, ie QB for American football, you need to think under pressure like none other. You need to be constantly thinking what the defense is doing, making sure you know what your offesne is doing and then make a decision within a split second while there are 4-7 guys twice your size trying to get to you to take your head off. American football is basically a very complicated game of chess but with pressure.

There is probably no better EC than competitive sports to show you have the skills recruiters look for.
Sports is an ok EC, but there are more intelligent ones out there like creating a successful start-up. That is more impressive than getting sandwiched and enjoying favours in the shower by other guys.
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LegallyBlonde2.0
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texex
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#26
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(Original post by LegallyBlonde2.0)
This is exactly the blah blah blah interpretation of a simple free time activity.

The same as " I wanted to walk across the road with my friends yesterday and had to make decisions in a split second on when to make the first steps while there were 4-7 cars twice your size trying to get to you. I am very committed and I practice road crossing everyday. Crossing road with friends is basically a very complicated game of chess but with pressure. I also learned how to work/move in a team.
Give me an internship place."

You can inflate any activity to sound relevant to ib but HR and MDs see through this easily. At company presentations/dinners last year HR and professionals (IBers, traders, structurers) couldn't care less when guys like these came with their travel/sport achievement stories.
Lol youve never played sports competitively have you?

1) If you dont know anything about football then dont bother. We have around a 100 play playbook where in each play you have to know what all the players are doing. Lets go through a sample play. You have around 30 seconds to pick a play, get the team lined up, read the defense and then snap the ball. lets take each step

0-15 seconds: get your team in a huddle, think about what the defense tried to do last time, choose a play out of the potential 100 depending on what down it is, how many yards to go, how much time there is left, what is the score.

15-20 seconds: get your team lined up

20-30: look at what the defense is showing (ie blitz, cover 2, cover 3, man to man, are the corners pressing, are the safeties crowding the line)

snap the ball.

You have about 4 seconds on average to react to the defense, therefore see if the free safety chooses a side, if the linebackers blitz, if there is a breakdown in protection, if any corners got outright beat, choose the most viable option (out of the 3 or 4 receivers or the halfback/fullback). If you wait any longer you are most likely gonna be hit very hard without even seeing it coming and therefore constantly have to be thinking about rolling out to either side to keep the play alive.

Repeat many times a game. If you think this is the same thing as walking across the street then you must be walking on one complicated street.

No work experience or internship builds the teamwork skills that playing a competitive sport does. In high school we had team workouts before school and then 2.5 hours of practice every day after. Its not about 'showing you can wake up at 5 am', its about showing that you can dedicate yourself and work your ass off.

Btw, you will be forever the candlestick girl, might as well change your username
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LegallyBlonde2.0
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uthinkilltellu
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#28
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(Original post by LegallyBlonde2.0)
I like that both of us have these profile photos. It looks as if we were talking to each other on the phone
Except you are not white
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carbonman
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Gotta disagree there I'm afraid. In my opinion Sports are an excellent Extra Curricular activity if its at a sufficiently high level but in most instances I would say that anything below county level is just a bit of fun. Fair enough 1st teams at university in football and rugby perhaps as they these can be fairly competitive, but American football, sorry you have got to be kidding. Its a just a piss and the majority of the team will probably be there because they couldn't cut it in a more mainstream sport.

I'm not trying to be an a*sehole, and I do appreciate the advice that can be gained on this forum, but that's how I see it.
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carbonman
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#30
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* piss up
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LegallyBlonde2.0
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texex
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#32
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#32
(Original post by carbonman)
Gotta disagree there I'm afraid. In my opinion Sports are an excellent Extra Curricular activity if its at a sufficiently high level but in most instances I would say that anything below county level is just a bit of fun. Fair enough 1st teams at university in football and rugby perhaps as they these can be fairly competitive, but American football, sorry you have got to be kidding. Its a just a piss and the majority of the team will probably be there because they couldn't cut it in a more mainstream sport.

I'm not trying to be an a*sehole, and I do appreciate the advice that can be gained on this forum, but that's how I see it.
The majority of the team is there cuz they can ******* destroy someone. If you have never played then you cannot know. It doesn't matter what level of competition it is in terms of national etc. Its about how dedicated the team is. I played for a top Moscow under 15 ice hockey team growing up when I lived in Russia which was technically more competitive, but I would in no way say it was any more serious than other sports I played.

Bt yea I agree, if you are on a team that just takes the piss like the twice a week football scrimmages you can join then its worth ****.
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LegallyBlonde2.0
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uthinkilltellu
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#34
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(Original post by LegallyBlonde2.0)
I'm white. Sry if you expected me to be more exotic.
My heart is forever broken now that I know you are not a hybrid. [Playing the world's saddest song on the world's smallest violin.]
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LegallyBlonde2.0
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texex
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#36
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(Original post by LegallyBlonde2.0)
I've seen a world champion at a uni and he didn't even know what a logarithm was. When you play sports at that level from a young age, academics suffer. Imagine, you are an HR or hiring MD.

Would you hire and give him a book and the money of clients to trade with ? Will he beat the brightest and the best in the markets ?

Does even the high level sport make you a good trader/ibder/sales professional ?
Of course it doesnt automatically make you a good trader. But like my previous example with QB, you have to constantly be thinking, constantly be weighing up decisions and trying to come up with a good strategy in a very short time frame. That translates to trading a lot better than doing a start up for example.

And sports at a high level only drag down on your academics if you choose to. During HS I had to choose 2 out of sports, academics, social life, and I chose the first two. I had around 35-40 hour a week commitment with sports during HS, and I managed to get a 40 in the IB which is not too bad, so you can definitely play at a competitive level and not let academics suffer if you are committed.
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LegallyBlonde2.0
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texex
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#38
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(Original post by LegallyBlonde2.0)
The difference is that when you chase a ball with your friends in a field you don't risk your money. When you do a start-up you risk your money by making certain decisions and that's a special kind of stress. You can say that you got all these transferable skills but you do not bet on it financially. You say they're there but you don't put your money on it.

By risking your own money in a start-up you show that you do believe in your business instincts and money making skills, starting your own business is practically betting on your skills. Big profits mean that the market says you've got something in you, especially in the current economic environment.

In trading or in any division of ibanking you do the same. You have an idea, strategy and you bet on it.

Btw I would have chosen academics and social life, you learn a lot more about life, business, trading, ibanking...anything by being around the right people.
Thats a really vague connection, just because you can risk money on a idea shows really nothing. I bet on sports, and I sure as hell have not learnt anything. Also with American football, if you make a mistake you risk your health, which I would rather lose 1000's of pounds then tear and ACL, so there is still a huge risk factor, even if it isnt money. And in sports, this risk factor comes in a lot shorter of a time frame, similar to trading.

By social life I mean going out and getting drunk out of your ass etc. Believe me, I learned a lot more about what its like to wokr in a team and what hard work and commitment means then I ever would drinking 18 shots in one night. Remember, you spend a big chunk of theday with the ppl on the desk, simialrly me and my teammates would spend upwards of 10 hours a day together if u add in school.
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LegallyBlonde2.0
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ElemenT'
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#40
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(Original post by LegallyBlonde2.0)
That's not a vague connection. Making money by setting up a business demonstrates that you understand some market dynamics, know how business managers think (useful if u trade equities), you can compete and beat rival companies or have the ability to spot unsaturated segments of a market. Very very relevant to banking/trading.

When I mentioned betting, I meant betting on your skills and yourself with your own money when setting up a business, not betting around and gambling. Yeah, you mentioned hard work and skills and commitments but....Have you ever bet on your or your team's performance with a considerable amount of money (thousands of pounds) ? It's not what you say you have gained/think, but whether you would stake a large amount of money on your skills.

In business/banking/trading you can keep telling these stories and ideas to yourself, the main question is whether you would risk (your bonus or your client's) money on what you think and more importantly whether you could make a profit.

You should have learned hard work and commitment by doing well at your Alevels or by getting into Oxbridge/LSE/Warwick/UCL. Socialising may mean getting wasted in your dictionary, but smart people never get drunk around important persons.
say that to the interns who got offers after drinking £4000 worth of champayne or what ever it was.

ballin'
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