Chemical engineering Watch

mfc20
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Skycat)
Pretty much, I'd sooner go into chemical engineering without chemistry than physics.
Bit off topic but can I just ask seeing as you're at Sheff, what were your other 4 applications?
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Skycat
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#22
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#22
(Original post by mfc20)
Bit off topic but can I just ask seeing as you're at Sheff, what were your other 4 applications?
Imperial, Bath, Edinburgh and UCL. I got offers from all five universities and initially firmed UCL and put Sheffield as my insurance. Then over the course of the summer exams I realized a) I didn't want to live in London b) I couldn't afford to live in London c) didn't like the look of UCL d) I absolutely loved how friendly Sheffield was made out to be and e) the course in Sheffield is a lot better.
I phoned UCAS in July and after talking to admissions tutors from both UCL and Sheffield I rejected my UCL offer and put Sheffield as my firm.

I didn't take the Edinburgh offer because it was very far and I didn't really like the look of the course that much, and I rejected the Imperial offer because I didn't like the overall vibe I was getting about Imperial from others (I wanted a good uni but I also wanted a very good social life), and I think I wouldn't have been happy in a town as small as Bath.

So here I am in Sheffield absolutely LOVING it. :p: If you have any questions about Sheffield or ChemEng please do ask, I'll be happy to help.
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mfc20
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#23
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#23
(Original post by Skycat)
Imperial, Bath, Edinburgh and UCL. I got offers from all five universities and initially firmed UCL and put Sheffield as my insurance. Then over the course of the summer exams I realized a) I didn't want to live in London b) I couldn't afford to live in London c) didn't like the look of UCL d) I absolutely loved how friendly Sheffield was made out to be and e) the course in Sheffield is a lot better.
I phoned UCAS in July and after talking to admissions tutors from both UCL and Sheffield I rejected my UCL offer and put Sheffield as my firm.

I didn't take the Edinburgh offer because it was very far and I didn't really like the look of the course that much, and I rejected the Imperial offer because I didn't like the overall vibe I was getting about Imperial from others (I wanted a good uni but I also wanted a very good social life), and I think I wouldn't have been happy in a town as small as Bath.

So here I am in Sheffield absolutely LOVING it. :p: If you have any questions about Sheffield or ChemEng please do ask, I'll be happy to help.
That's answered a lot of questions for me! So even though you got an offer from Imperial which is regarded as probably the best single ChemEng course you went to Sheffield, and have no regrets, that's good to hear. Would you agree then that despite Imperial having a decent course it's social life takes it down a bit?
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Skycat
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#24
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#24
(Original post by mfc20)
That's answered a lot of questions for me! So even though you got an offer from Imperial which is regarded as probably the best single ChemEng course you went to Sheffield, and have no regrets, that's good to hear. Would you agree then that despite Imperial having a decent course it's social life takes it down a bit?
To understand my thinking you probably need a bit more background:

I got really good GCSEs, likewise for A-Levels, and my headmaster was really pushing me towards Oxbridge (practically forced me to do 5AS-levels instead of 4, dropped it for A2 though, for example). However, I don't regard myself as that clever and I really wanted the full experience with an amazing social life to go with a decent course. As a result, I decided to finally grow some balls and say "Actually, NO." So I didn't apply to Oxbridge, and the only reason I applied to Imperial was because in the 4th year you can specialize in nuclear engineering which is what I was hoping to do back then. I heard a lot of bad things about Imperial social life so I figured UCL was a decent compromise between a good uni and a decent social life, but then I realized I didn't like the look of it, it didn't seem friendly and I don't like (and can't afford) London.
Sheffield looked really friendly and inviting, an extremely good course (was mentioned in The Chemical Engineer as being the only UK uni ChemEng course which does a reasonable amount of teaching on process safety and loss prevention) but laid back. Let's just say the rumours were true, the uni and the city is overall sooo friendly. The course is tough as hell but I like it, and I don't regret this decision to reject offers from "better" unis for a single second.

I don't know, many people thought I was stupid for rejecting those offers but I'm not fussed, I didn't want to go to uni to get a good degree so I can get a good job, I wanted to go to uni to study what I liked and get an at least acceptable degree. I'd much sooner take a degree from a crappy university and have a blast than get an amazing degree from Oxbridge but have a **** time (note I'm not saying Oxbridge is **** for social life, I'm simply stating it's not for me, personally). I got very lucky though, I'm having a blast at Sheffield AND it's a really good university.

EDIT: I forgot to mention for me Sheffield has the best course simply because I'll be able to do a lot on fire safety engineering and loss prevention which is what I'm really intested in.
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HiBear
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#25
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#25
I didn't do any mechanics, and no physics. . .
I feel fine. Last term I kinda felt a bit disadvantaged, but then again I scored better on the physics-y module than those who;d done physics so yeah i felt so proud of myself :proud:. this term not so much. I think it's a lot to do with the fact that it's quite a lot of math... if it isn't mechanics, it's electricity (involving loads of calculus <3) and it's not too difficult to grasp... well if you pester everyone around you to explain :ninja:

But wherever you apply I think you'll be alright. Ofc the "lesser" unis can't really match up to the name of Imperial/Oxbridge but it's all the same almost. You get quite a lot of good companies wanting to recruit you (eg. I know 4th years with jobs at Exxon, GSK etc. and plenty of people with summer placements wherever.. even in the industrial dinner (where companies come and get you drunk :coma:) there were people from pepsico, BP, exxon, e-on, schlumberger etcetcetc. So I guess there aren't that many "better" companies than that those, and if they want to recruit you.... your uni must be good enough.

im not entirely sure if this makes any sense at all. this is procrastination at its lowest....
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Swiney
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#26
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#26
Hey I was thinking of doing Chem eng in Uni , iam currently doing my AS Maths- Physics- Chem and Bio , thinking of dropping Physics for A2(would that put me at a disadvantage?) and what re the career prospects like after? Are chem engineers in demand? do they hire and train graduates or how is the job structure from a graduate to a Chartered engineer for example?

phew thats a lot of questions but if anyone can help it will be much appreciated...
Thanks/
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blacktabs
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Swiney)
Hey I was thinking of doing Chem eng in Uni , iam currently doing my AS Maths- Physics- Chem and Bio , thinking of dropping Physics for A2(would that put me at a disadvantage?) and what re the career prospects like after? Are chem engineers in demand? do they hire and train graduates or how is the job structure from a graduate to a Chartered engineer for example?

phew thats a lot of questions but if anyone can help it will be much appreciated...
Thanks/
If you can manage to carry on with physics then I would recomend it as engineering is very physics / maths related and we have done very little chemistry this year, though I personally didn't do physics at all and so struggled a bit, not sure whether carrying on for A2 would give a huge advantage over having done some AS, will depend on syllabus etc and afraid I can't really help with that.
Career prospects are good as chemical engineers are involved in everything, petrochemicals, pharmacuticals, food - basically any manufacturing process really.
Jobs will always train you, but most of what you need to know will come from your university course. If you want to become chartered them you will have to do the MEng rather than the BEng on an iChemE approved course, then when you go into work you will have to do some practical applications of what you have learnt at university as well as a few other things, not entirely sure what before you become chartered which will take a few years. If you want more information I would look up the iChemE site (though not sure how useful it is) or maybe whynotchemeng for a bit more information.
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Neysa
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#28
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#28
Heya
i'm looking at applying to do chemical engineering but it's a bit tough. Was looking at university of birmingham and they had 615 applications for 62 places so that seems hard to me..and to top it off they are not accepting resits now. I really like want to go there any advise on how to stand out
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ThisIsMyUserName12
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#29
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#29
thinking about chem eng as a career choice. going to pick AH maths and chemistry , would picking physics at higher give me an advantage?
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Smack
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#30
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#30
(Original post by ThisIsMyUserName12)
thinking about chem eng as a career choice. going to pick AH maths and chemistry , would picking physics at higher give me an advantage?
I don't think you'd even get into engineering without physics.

Chemical engineering, despite the name, usually doesn't involve that much chemistry. In the workplace, it still involves mainly maths and physics (e.g. fluids, thermodynamics and stuff).
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HiBear
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Smack)
I don't think you'd even get into engineering without physics.

Chemical engineering, despite the name, usually doesn't involve that much chemistry. In the workplace, it still involves mainly maths and physics (e.g. fluids, thermodynamics and stuff).
im sorry but chemeng without physics is doable. atm i would say i was had the required amount of physics needed for this course after doing 1st year. i am quite a workaholic and i know this and it might not be easy for other people to do this but it is possible and should be possible to get a good overall grade. i bet ive done better than loads of other people who did do physics at a level.
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Skycat
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#32
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#32
(Original post by Smack)
I don't think you'd even get into engineering without physics.

Chemical engineering, despite the name, usually doesn't involve that much chemistry. In the workplace, it still involves mainly maths and physics (e.g. fluids, thermodynamics and stuff).
Agreed, there really isn't much chemistry at all.

I'm much, much sooner go into chemical & process engineering with physics and maths as opposed to chemistry and maths.
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Smack
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#33
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#33
(Original post by HiBear)
im sorry but chemeng without physics is doable. atm i would say i was had the required amount of physics needed for this course after doing 1st year. i am quite a workaholic and i know this and it might not be easy for other people to do this but it is possible and should be possible to get a good overall grade. i bet ive done better than loads of other people who did do physics at a level.
I was more getting at entry requirements: the unis I looked at for chem eng (Edinburgh and Strathclyde) all required at least higher physics.

I am no way saying that if haven't studied physics (but have studied maths and chemistry) that you'll fail or find the work difficult (as you prove this is not the case), but universities won't accept you for chem eng.
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Lorenzo666
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#34
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#34
(Original post by Smack)
I don't think you'd even get into engineering without physics.

Chemical engineering, despite the name, usually doesn't involve that much chemistry. In the workplace, it still involves mainly maths and physics (e.g. fluids, thermodynamics and stuff).
Wrong. I didn't do physics A level and I'm doing chemical engineering at nottingham, and i had a personal statement for medicine with not a word on it to do with chemical engineering
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ksahnan
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#35
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#35
(Original post by Lorenzo666)
Wrong. I didn't do physics A level and I'm doing chemical engineering at nottingham, and i had a personal statement for medicine with not a word on it to do with chemical engineering
Hi, I'm thinking of applying for chemical engineering too, but i did physics at as level. How are you finding it? Do you think the physics bit really outweighs the the chemistry bit? I really just want to apply to a good course with loads of chem in it... bit off topic but does anyone have any suggestions???
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Skycat
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#36
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#36
(Original post by ksahnan)
Hi, I'm thinking of applying for chemical engineering too, but i did physics at as level. How are you finding it? Do you think the physics bit really outweighs the the chemistry bit? I really just want to apply to a good course with loads of chem in it... bit off topic but does anyone have any suggestions???
There's way more physics than chemistry, my rough estimate is for every 10 hours of physics you'll be lucky to have 1 hour of chemistry.

If you want to apply to a good course with loads of chemistry in it, just apply for straight chemistry (or biochemistry or something similar).
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Lorenzo666
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#37
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#37
(Original post by ksahnan)
Hi, I'm thinking of applying for chemical engineering too, but i did physics at as level. How are you finding it? Do you think the physics bit really outweighs the the chemistry bit? I really just want to apply to a good course with loads of chem in it... bit off topic but does anyone have any suggestions???
If you really enjoy chemistry then do a chemistry degree, the sort of chemistry that you do in chemical engineering is mainly environmental, analytical and interfacial chemistry. We did some physics, but its mainly maths I would say. You have to ask yourself whether you want to be a chemical engineer as that's the objective of the course, the main topics that are covered are heat and mass transfer (physics), Separation processes, thermodynamics, differential calculus, fluid mechanics, geology (at nottingham), process engineering, plant design and computer systems. Chemistry kind of crops up in some of these areas, but its not things like drawing out long mechanisms but more to do with enthalpy, gibbs free energy and the general thermodynamics and kinetics involved, and the governing principles of whether reactions will occur under specific conditions. I would try and research as much as possible about chemical engineering before you apply as there are misconceptions as to what a degree in it entails, there's a lot of flow diagrams, using graphs, dimensional analysis and safety engineering, its certainly not what I thought it would be.
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heatgh
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#38
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#38
Hey, would you think being pedicted 2As and a C at A2 be good enough to get offers from unis that are mid-table for chem eng? Say the 2 A's were in both in maths and chem and the C's in bio. Its just that im kinda in a bit of a pickle of whether 1. I can get into the competitive chem eng courses and 2. whether i should just go for Chemistry at uni instead.

Cheers
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llamababymama
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#39
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#39
(Original post by Lorenzo666)
If you really enjoy chemistry then do a chemistry degree, the sort of chemistry that you do in chemical engineering is mainly environmental, analytical and interfacial chemistry. We did some physics, but its mainly maths I would say. You have to ask yourself whether you want to be a chemical engineer as that's the objective of the course, the main topics that are covered are heat and mass transfer (physics), Separation processes, thermodynamics, differential calculus, fluid mechanics, geology (at nottingham), process engineering, plant design and computer systems. Chemistry kind of crops up in some of these areas, but its not things like drawing out long mechanisms but more to do with enthalpy, gibbs free energy and the general thermodynamics and kinetics involved, and the governing principles of whether reactions will occur under specific conditions. I would try and research as much as possible about chemical engineering before you apply as there are misconceptions as to what a degree in it entails, there's a lot of flow diagrams, using graphs, dimensional analysis and safety engineering, its certainly not what I thought it would be.
Hey, I'm starting chemical engineering at Nottingham this September. Could you recommend any good chemeng books to get started on before uni? Textbooks, workbooks...i'm down with anything in the book family really :p:
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Skycat
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#40
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#40
(Original post by llamababymama)
Hey, I'm starting chemical engineering at Nottingham this September. Could you recommend any good chemeng books to get started on before uni? Textbooks, workbooks...i'm down with anything in the book family really :p:
You could try Felder & Rousseau's "Elementary Principles of Chemical Processes," contains the basics that you will probably start learning in the first semester and onwards.
As for the mathematics involved, K.A. Stroud's "Engineering Mathematics" is considered a good textbook.

To tell you the truth though, in your place I wouldn't read ahead, I'd say it's much better when you're taught it properly and explained it.

Instead, if you're keen on doing something, revise your physics and revise your maths so it's spot on before starting uni.
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