What do doctors think of people who google their own diagnosis? Watch

Magnanimity
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#21
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#21
Perhaps if doctors were a little more interested and competent, people might have enough faith that they don't have to google what they spent 5 years 'learning'.
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InArduisFouette
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#22
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#22
(Original post by Jamie)
"NHS Direct was made by doctors"

not exactly. Doctors have very little to do with it.
however i suspect that the clinical content would have been reviewed by a variety of healthcare professionals, including the relevant Medical Consultants and that NHSD has IIRC a medical director


the fundamental problem with NHS(re)direct is that it should have solely been a signposting system for access to services and the money spent on clinical advice put into face to face services ( e.g. OOH primary care, walk-in centres/ Minor Injuries Units and Emergency Care Practitioners) it's a Nuliarbore triumph of style over substance and a symptom of the way in which lay managers think they know about service delivery
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Glorious Lozhka
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#23
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#23
I find that my doctor doesn't tend to do all that much unless I go in with a suggestion or two as to what might be wrong with me. :dontknow:
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mummyperson
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#24
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#24
There is nothing wrong with googling your own diagnosis once its been made by the doctor
In fact a good doctor might even give you the websites to google because some sites are obviously better than others
Lots of patients mums /dads come to me and say they have read such and such in the newpaper/on the internet about their child's diagnosis or a brand new treatment and what do I think. I like that. It shows interest and involvement.
However putting in symptoms and trying to make your own diagnosis is a bit hypochondriachal
Isnt it better if you are worried about your health to go to the doctor and say 'I have got this and this and this ' and let him/her ask you some relevant questions and examine you and even refer you to a specialist if he/she thinks it necessary?
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sidewalkwhenshewalks
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#25
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#25
Say you think you have ME (kinda the opposite situation); they love that
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flugestuge
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#26
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#26
(Original post by Joseph90)
NHS Direct was made by doctors.
Wrong.
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Anon the 7th
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#27
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#27
they'll think you're putting them out of a job

or...on the other hand, that you are saving them a job
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fallen angel9
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#28
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#28
(Original post by Ozzy91)
Just dont mention that you've looked it up at all. I did it once.. Never again. The moment I said 'I think it might be' his face instantly changed and he instantly seemed to become very dismissive. Dont know if anyone else has had this?
I've had that before. Now I just avoid going to the GP all together because I just think they're going to dismiss anything I have to say.
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Geritak
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#29
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#29
All I'd do is make an appointment, outline your symptoms and explain that you've had them for years, but recently you've begun to wonder whether or not there's something underlying it. Don't go in and announce that, thanks to google, you know what the problem is and all you want is treatment, as you might get his/her back up a bit that way.

You might find that their diagnosis matches yours, or you might not. If not, it may be worth casually mentioning that you've heard of something called DSPS which sounds similar to your experiences, just in case it's not a possibility s/he considered. Just avoid mentioning the word 'google', in case of any prejudice.
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Degausser
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#30
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#30
Patient is ill. Patient diagnoses themselves with an illness that needs no treatment. Patient actually has a serious illness that needs immediate treatment.

Anyone see where this is going?
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GodspeedGehenna
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#31
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#31
You do realise that when they leave the room for "just one moment", they're actually going to google your symptoms.
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Jamie
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#32
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#32
(Original post by zippyRN)
however i suspect that the clinical content would have been reviewed by a variety of healthcare professionals, including the relevant Medical Consultants and that NHSD has IIRC a medical director


the fundamental problem with NHS(re)direct is that it should have solely been a signposting system for access to services and the money spent on clinical advice put into face to face services ( e.g. OOH primary care, walk-in centres/ Minor Injuries Units and Emergency Care Practitioners) it's a Nuliarbore triumph of style over substance and a symptom of the way in which lay managers think they know about service delivery
Sigh, as usual the nurse wants a nurse led solution.

Keep the A&Es open, and have more OOH GP services (even if that means basing a GP OOH in the A&E dept.

Walk in centres & minor injury units are exceptionally expensive for the limited service they provide.
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InArduisFouette
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#33
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#33
(Original post by Jamie)
Sigh, as usual the nurse wants a nurse led solution.

Keep the A&Es open, and have more OOH GP services (even if that means basing a GP OOH in the A&E dept.

Walk in centres & minor injury units are exceptionally expensive for the limited service they provide.
A+E departments need a critical mass of attendances and seriously ill or injured patients

why?

1. to provide adequate learning opportunities for Foundation, ACCS and GPVTS Junior Doctors

2. to justify the expenditure of a 8 handed ( if not more ) rota at both
'proper reg' StR level / staff grade and at Consultant /Staff Specialist level to provide 24 hour resident middle grade and extended day resident / none onerous on call senior doctor cover.

3. to provide a clinically credible and relevant resuscitation and trauma service staffed by suitable skilled and experienced Medical, Nursing and support staff, supported by a clinically credible and sustainable Inpatient service in acute medicine / respiratory / cardiology, emergency general surgery and critical care , before we consider other surgical specialities such as burns and plastics, urology, cardiothoracic , neuro ...

OOH GP services do not represent good value for money, based on the number of inappropriate and unjustified A+E attendances they generate, their inability to provide adequate basic investigations ( such as accurate physiological observations, simple near patient testing ( e.g. glucometry, urine dip , 12 lead ecg) , not to mention inadequate documentation, and inappropriate transport decisions when admission is justified. - all things that band 3 HCA staff do in A+E under 'initial assessment' protocol and the supervision of an RN)

A well run Minor injuries unit, WIC, or 'road based' ECP scheme with good clinical guidelines and a good working relationship ( including rotating Nursing/ Paramedic staff between environments) with their 'major' A+E is extremely effective, the greatest blocks here are the arrogance of Medical Staff outside emergency care ( often radiologists and senior radiographers - especially the senior radiographers jealous of band 5 and 6 Nursing / Paramedic/ Physio staff who can request imaging, but also where gen med and surgery will not take referrals from none medical referrers) and the ignorance of lay management as to what the law allows Nurses and AHPs to do, plus a few legislative black holes ...
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InArduisFouette
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#34
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#34
those wishing to join the discussion of the politics of emergency and urgent care please do so here

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...1#post21357931
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eurydice333
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#35
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#35
The doctors seem to print off loads of stuff from the internet anyway these days, I got handed 10 pages of crap at my last appointment. Plus they're not always right (even if it's some fuddy duddy who thinks he knows it all).
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Spleeny
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#36
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#36
It depends on the doctor, I googled my symptoms and the first one I saw was totally dismissive and rude but the next day I saw someone else and they were really nice about it and took what I said seriously.
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darkrose287
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#37
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#37
I self diagnosed, went to the doctors and told him what I thought I had and asked him to refer me to somebody more relavant. He sked me a lot of unrelated questions then decided I was clinicaly depressed. I'm quite obviously not if you know me, so I was quite annoyed.
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chan89
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#38
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#38
My Doctor googles stuff all the time when I'm there :dontknow:
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Jamie
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#39
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#39
(Original post by eurydice333)
The doctors seem to print off loads of stuff from the internet anyway these days, I got handed 10 pages of crap at my last appointment. Plus they're not always right (even if it's some fuddy duddy who thinks he knows it all).
there is a website called www.patient.co.uk.

when i worked in a GP practice i would often print off the relevant pages for my patients.

I make the diagnosis, I give information about the disease and prgnosis etc.

But its nice to have it explained simply ina leaflet you can take home with you - especially if you have relatives at home who want every detail!
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