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    (Original post by jinsisi)
    As the times go by,more and more Chinese students will have as much leisure interests as the uk students.
    For example,I was among the top 1% in the fierce competition of the high school entrance exam of altogether 170,000 studnets inPeking.But besides classroom work,I am interested in social events.I am a leader in the students' union,the editor of the school magazine and the head of the volunteer group.I like dancing,debating,writing novel and watching football match.My favourate football player is Li Tie,who is now serving for Efton in UK.
    Sounds like a CV
    Sorry, my post wasn't meant to be a criticism of all Chinese students, in fact, none of them. I admire them for their diligence and wish more of us could be like that. It was an observation of teachers' concerns about their extreme work ethic and being told that some of the students do not socialise because they spend all their spare time working.
    Perhaps members of the forum have experience of sharing schools/unis with those from China and can give their knowledge from that sharing?
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    (Original post by yawn1)
    Sounds like a CV
    Sorry, my post wasn't meant to be a criticism of all Chinese students, in fact, none of them. I admire them for their diligence and wish more of us could be like that. It was an observation of teachers' concerns about their extreme work ethic and being told that some of the students do not socialise because they spend all their spare time working.
    Perhaps members of the forum have experience of sharing schools/unis with those from China and can give their knowledge from that sharing?
    Yes,in fact,study is the most important thing for us .
    After class,we first finish our homework which teachers told us to do, then prepare for the lessons which will be study next day and review the lessons which studied before.Sometime we also do some practices.After we finish all of above,we will play computer or any other interests.
    In China,most of the students are hard-working and want to be the best students.But,you know, the number of best students is limited,so we must compete with others.
    Good education,good job;good job,good life.
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    (Original post by jinsisi)
    Yes,in fact,study is the most important thing for us .
    After class,we first finish our homework which teachers told us to do, then prepare for the lessons which will be study next day and review the lessons which studied before.Sometime we also do some practices.After we finish all of above,we will play computer or any other interests.
    In China,most of the students are hard-working and want to be the best students.But,you know, the number of best students is limited,so we must compete with others.
    Good education,good job;good job,good life.
    How hard is it to get into university in China? What proportion of school leavers have the opportunity to study for a degree in your homeland? Do most have to go abroad to university?
    I can see that if your options are limited within your own country you would perhaps strive that much harder to achieve highly.

    Speaking from the perspective of Imperial College, which has quite a number of Chinese students, I think that the BMO isn't highly desirable.

    Generally, there are two main hurdles to Chinese applicants. Firstly, language can be problematic: it's important to be able to convey your ability to an interviewer if English is not your first language. Secondly, and probably more importantly, is your ability to pay the overseas rate of tuition fees and living expenses. If you are able to convey a reasonable level of academic ability and the fact that you are a well rounded person, and if you are able to pay, you should be given a place (even at Cambridge...) The importance of this second factor, though, is exhibited by the relatively low proportion of Chinese students from mainland China as opposed to Hong Kong.

    Beyond application, though, the first factor (language) becomes more significant. Firstly, Chinese students tend to be slightly introspective, tending to stay within their own groups. Secondly, though Chinese students may initially have excellent mathematical ability (though some people are of the belief that it is too heavily biased towards pure maths --- I am not, though, as I really enjoy pure maths), this fails to manifest itself in grades during the degree, and it is suspected that this is probably due to language.

    Another factor worthy of mention is that many Hong Kong students studied for 'A' Levels in the UK; this really helps their application.

    So, in conclusion and to ignore the financial side, my advice would be to ignore the BMO and concentrate on becoming as fluent in "International English" (one of my Chinese friends told me that that is what English-English is called as you can in preparation for the studying here. As suggested, listening to Radio 4 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/) is a really good way to do this. Moreover, it will give you an impression of what life is really like here in the UK (though perhaps overly negative).

    Anyway, hope this helps, and good luck in your applications!
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    (Original post by Dogtanian)
    Speaking from the perspective of Imperial College, which has quite a number of Chinese students, I think that the BMO isn't highly desirable.

    Generally, there are two main hurdles to Chinese applicants. Firstly, language can be problematic: it's important to be able to convey your ability to an interviewer if English is not your first language. Secondly, and probably more importantly, is your ability to pay the overseas rate of tuition fees and living expenses. If you are able to convey a reasonable level of academic ability and the fact that you are a well rounded person, and if you are able to pay, you should be given a place (even at Cambridge...) The importance of this second factor, though, is exhibited by the relatively low proportion of Chinese students from mainland China as opposed to Hong Kong.

    Beyond application, though, the first factor (language) becomes more significant. Firstly, Chinese students tend to be slightly introspective, tending to stay within their own groups. Secondly, though Chinese students may initially have excellent mathematical ability (though some people are of the belief that it is too heavily biased towards pure maths --- I am not, though, as I really enjoy pure maths), this fails to manifest itself in grades during the degree, and it is suspected that this is probably due to language.

    Another factor worthy of mention is that many Hong Kong students studied for 'A' Levels in the UK; this really helps their application.

    So, in conclusion and to ignore the financial side, my advice would be to ignore the BMO and concentrate on becoming as fluent in "International English" (one of my Chinese friends told me that that is what English-English is called as you can in preparation for the studying here. As suggested, listening to Radio 4 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/) is a really good way to do this. Moreover, it will give you an impression of what life is really like here in the UK (though perhaps overly negative).

    Anyway, hope this helps, and good luck in your applications!

    Cambridge like only allows about 6 people from foreign country into its program. And they have to pay £6000 per year for an ordinary subject.

    For medicine, it is £20,000 per year.

    How skank is that?

    Only 6 per year onto each course?

    It's also at _least_ £6,000/year. For a science / engineering subject (and I think that maths is charged as one), it's probably about £10,000/year. When you add this to about £5,000 / year to live off, it starts to get very expensive...

    (Original post by 2776)
    Cambridge like only allows about 6 people from foreign country into its program. And they have to pay £6000 per year for an ordinary subject.

    For medicine, it is £20,000 per year.

    How skank is that?
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    (Original post by Dogtanian)
    Only 6 per year onto each course?

    It's also at _least_ £6,000/year. For a science / engineering subject (and I think that maths is charged as one), it's probably about £10,000/year. When you add this to about £5,000 / year to live off, it starts to get very expensive...
    I know, thats why prolly if u get into a university, then I reckon its worthwhile paying for the tuition fee, if the resources are to be improved.
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    (Original post by yawn1)
    How hard is it to get into university in China? What proportion of school leavers have the opportunity to study for a degree in your homeland? Do most have to go abroad to university?
    I can see that if your options are limited within your own country you would perhaps strive that much harder to achieve highly.
    Sorry,I don't konw the exactly proportion.Maybe 1 in 5?I just mean in the senior high school.Beacause not all the junior school students can go on to study in senior school.(maybe only about 20%~~~~)
    The big city students have much more chances than the small city students.
    If a child who lives in the countryside can go to a university to study,it must be the biggest thing of his village.Everyone in his village will proud of him and gather their money together to send the child to the university.
    And,in fact,just go to a university and study for a degree is not enough.It is reported by official newspaper that there will be 300 million new graduates rushing in the job market next year, and many of them are expected to become unemployed on the day of their graduation.
    So if we want to get a job,we have to study in the good universities to make ourselves have more competitiveness.
    The competition is cruel.
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    (Original post by Dogtanian)
    Speaking from the perspective of Imperial College, which has quite a number of Chinese students, I think that the BMO isn't highly desirable.

    Generally, there are two main hurdles to Chinese applicants. Firstly, language can be problematic: it's important to be able to convey your ability to an interviewer if English is not your first language. Secondly, and probably more importantly, is your ability to pay the overseas rate of tuition fees and living expenses. If you are able to convey a reasonable level of academic ability and the fact that you are a well rounded person, and if you are able to pay, you should be given a place (even at Cambridge...) The importance of this second factor, though, is exhibited by the relatively low proportion of Chinese students from mainland China as opposed to Hong Kong.

    Beyond application, though, the first factor (language) becomes more significant. Firstly, Chinese students tend to be slightly introspective, tending to stay within their own groups. Secondly, though Chinese students may initially have excellent mathematical ability (though some people are of the belief that it is too heavily biased towards pure maths --- I am not, though, as I really enjoy pure maths), this fails to manifest itself in grades during the degree, and it is suspected that this is probably due to language.

    Another factor worthy of mention is that many Hong Kong students studied for 'A' Levels in the UK; this really helps their application.

    So, in conclusion and to ignore the financial side, my advice would be to ignore the BMO and concentrate on becoming as fluent in "International English" (one of my Chinese friends told me that that is what English-English is called as you can in preparation for the studying here. As suggested, listening to Radio 4 (http://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/) is a really good way to do this. Moreover, it will give you an impression of what life is really like here in the UK (though perhaps overly negative).

    Anyway, hope this helps, and good luck in your applications!
    Thank you for your excellent suggestions.Maybe you're right,language is much more important than BMO for me.It's very kind of you.
    I myself come from mainland of China.Attending high school or university in UK is really expensive.I will study A-level in Charterhouse and the tuition fees per year is about 20,000 pounds!Although Charterhouse gives me some exhibition for my high mark in maths and physics, the fees are also very high.
    But as far as I know,if the parents in China do not have enough money to supply their children's studying in UK,they won't do so.The high tuition fees are in their plan,and they think it is worth.
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    (Original post by jinsisi)
    Thank you for your excellent suggestions.Maybe you're right,language is much more important than BMO for me.It's very kind of you.
    I myself come from mainland of China.Attending high school or university in UK is really expensive.I will study A-level in Charterhouse and the tuition fees per year is about 20,000 pounds!Although Charterhouse gives me some exhibition for my high mark in maths and physics, the fees are also very high.
    But as far as I know,if the parents in China do not have enough money to supply their children's studying in UK,they won't do so.The high tuition fees are in their plan,and they think it is worth.
    I believe you will need IELTS....have you looked into it yet? I'm pretty sure you'll have to score very well.
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    (Original post by J.S.)
    I believe you will need IELTS....have you looked into it yet? I'm pretty sure you'll have to score very well.
    Yes,I need IELTS,every international students need IELTS.You konw quite a lot of things~~~~)
    I had taken the IELTS this summer,my result is 6.5.(writing:6,speaking:6,listen ing:7,reading 7)To be frankly my ability in English is not as good as the exams results showed.I prepared the IELTS for about 2 months,and did a lot of practices. There are some skills to pass the exam,they help me get higher mark.But 6.5 is not enough to go to the good universities.Oxbridge ,lse,imperial need 7,and some subjects such as law hope their students have 7.5.
    I will take the IELTS again before I apply for university,and I hope at that time I will make some progress.
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    I am also from China and doing A2-levels now. I also did BMO1 last year, and when the results come out, there appeals to be a number of Chinese. I agree with what you said. Not because they are intelligent but diligent! By the way, what subject do you want to pursue at university? and possibly which university?
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    (Original post by charles)
    I am also from China and doing A2-levels now. I also did BMO1 last year, and when the results come out, there appeals to be a number of Chinese. I agree with what you said. Not because they are intelligent but diligent! By the way, what subject do you want to pursue at university? and possibly which university?
    Hello,charles.
    Maybe law,I haven't decided it.What about you?
    Which university? Of course oxbridge is my dream!Have you applyed one of them?Good luck!
    BTW,which subjects do you take in A-level?
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    (Original post by yawn1)
    I was told by a maths teacher that students from China excel at maths because they work so hard at it, to the exclusion of having any leisure interests.
    Teachers here, although pleased to have students of that calibre to work with, get concerned about their social development and say they tend to be isolationist because of the culture of hard work.
    Our Chinese friends also tend to excel at music because there is a definite link between music and mathematics.
    u bet
    We've been trainning Olympics stuff since 7.
    but Chinese education is only concerntrated at calulations.
    We're very weak at Calulus stuff
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    (Original post by voodooAkko)
    u bet
    We've been trainning Olympics stuff since 7.
    but Chinese education is only concerntrated at calulations.
    We're very weak at Calulus stuff
    Yes,we don't have courses about calculus in middle school.But I think we can study anything by ourselves if we know the skills of how to learn new things.We can believe that we will do well in every subject if we are both clever and hard-working .
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    (Original post by jinsisi)
    Hello,charles.
    Maybe law,I haven't decided it.What about you?
    Which university? Of course oxbridge is my dream!Have you applyed one of them?Good luck!
    BTW,which subjects do you take in A-level?

    For law you will certainly need to get an exceptional IELTS score, perhaps even higher than they specifiy. It's going to be a lot of work! All the best!
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    (Original post by jinsisi)
    Hello,charles.
    Maybe law,I haven't decided it.What about you?
    Which university? Of course oxbridge is my dream!Have you applyed one of them?Good luck!
    BTW,which subjects do you take in A-level?
    I am going to do Physics and I applied for Oxford. It's nearly the interview time. Really worried...
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    (Original post by charles)
    I am going to do Physics and I applied for Oxford. It's nearly the interview time. Really worried...
    Don't worried.Trust yourself!
    Can I type Chinese?I'll have a try.
    给自己机会,有勇气试过了,无论成功与否,都值得自豪。牛津是万人景 仰的学府。希望你真能在那里学习。我会在万里之外的北京 为你祈祷。
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    (Original post by jinsisi)
    Yes,we don't have courses about calculus in middle school.But I think we can study anything by ourselves if we know the skills of how to learn new things.We can believe that we will do well in every subject if we are both clever and hard-working .
    through my first 3 months study of Alevel courses I found out we Chinese are not that clumsy at pratical 嘛
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    (Original post by voodooAkko)
    through my first 3 months study of Alevel courses I found out we Chinese are not that clumsy at pratical 嘛
    To be frankly,I am very clumsy at pratical~~~~~~In China every time we had experiment in class,my deskmate did all the pratical things and I just sit and told him how to do.hehe~~~~
 
 
 
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