BPP Holborn or Waterloo? Watch

FMQ
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#21
Report 8 years ago
#21
(Original post by hingus2000)
With all due respect, that is absolute BS. Perhaps a stylish loft would cost that, but there are loads of places around King's Cross for example that can be had for £100 - £150 a week.

There are plenty of places to be had in central London for a decent price. I have several friends living on Goodge St for example, for around £130.
I can assure you that is how much a small flat costs. Perhaps your friends rent rooms.
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EbonyEsq
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#22
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#22
Initial research shows that decent student accommodations cost at least £200/week in London.

The only exception I've found is Goodenough College which is really only reserved for international postgrad students.

London is super expensive.
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EbonyEsq
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#23
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#23
(Original post by FMQ)
As to renting in london it is v expensive in the areas people are talking about, unless you can get specific (often nasty) student accomodation
Well come on now. There is Hive and Canto Court, though I doubt they will accommodate to OP's doggie, especially seeing how he wants a garden. LOL.
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jacketpotato
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#24
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#24
(Original post by Eclipsegr)
I've only drove around London twice with rental car... But anyway, as I'm not used to getting tubes, buses, etc, I guess I will have to pay the charge monthly (add another 130+ to my calculations I guess... not too much anyways if you can ride your car and be in peace - hate crowded places!). Have already taken care of parking (another monthly fee)...
As others have said, you WILL need to get the tube or a train. London is an enormous place. You might have been able to drive around the outskirts. It will take you an absolute era to drive around the centre during rush hour. The traffic is worse in London than in any U.S. city, including New York: European cities were built long before the motor-car so you tend to have narrow streets and poor access making driving difficult. Public transport is very very easy and very very convenient so it won't be a problem, even if you've never used it before.

Plus you will have nowhere to park. Parking in central London is generally around $30 per day and you won't have decent facilities near the central city law schools.

(Original post by Eclipsegr)
I thought that things would be as "normal" as in all other EU capitals: jump in your car, go wherever you want to go, park you car, and do your thing...
Many other European cities are like that too. It is a bit easier to drive about most other European cities simply because central London is much busier and much more congested than most other European cities.
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hingus2000
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#25
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#25
(Original post by FMQ)
I can assure you that is how much a small flat costs. Perhaps your friends rent rooms.
To backtrack slightly, yes a flat costs around that, but obviously most students get digs together, and the costs are split between them, making it around the £100-£150 figure each.

But if the OP is referring to getting a flat on his/her own (I couldn't be arsed to read the whole thread), you are correct and I apologise!
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Eclipsegr
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#26
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#26
(Original post by Alexander)
Haha, the OP's attitude is getting more and more crazy/obnoxious. Also some things don't quite make sense. Isn't starting until September, but has "already taken care of parking"?!
:rolleyes:
I don't think I have insulted anyone, or the city of London, or the UK per se... so, don't try being clever Alexander, because you sound obnoxious (not to say anything worse...)
When I say I have already taken care of parking, I mean that I have checked which parking facility is the closest to the institution, have exchange a couple of emails with them clearing some things out (space, charges, etc) and have made up my mind... it doesn't necessarily mean that I have already "book" a place and I already pay for it, or whatever else you may have in your mind... no wonder some people don't pass the LPC, if they think that way... (a hint for you Alexander... don't EVER assume a fact; you should already know that if you study law ;-) ) I live by "procrastination=cancellatio n" and so I prefer to take care of things way ahead of time.
Even though I don't know your age (I mean all of you; don't take it personally), or what the average age of LPC students are, I do not consider myself just a student... again without wanting to insult any of you at all, what I mean by that is that I'm not a 25 year old student that still lives in his "student years"... been there, done that... I'm a working professional (for some years now), with a PhD in Finance and one in Law, who decided to move to the UK (for personal reasons) and become a practicing solicitor. I'm saying that, just to let you know that I'm not someone that is interested in "sharing" a cheap student accommodation, etc, etc... I'm moving to London with my wife and dog, so I'm looking at something different that most of you I guess. The point is not to get what you would expect one to want, but to get info on points I've asked... that's the point of this board anyways, isn't it?
That's why I'm looking for a decent place, with a garden (even if small), etc... If I have to drive 30 or so minutes out of London in order to find such a place, in a good price (good price of course is again subjective), I will do so. So, clear with that for those with no brains; luckily they seem to be very few!
Ok, let's get to the point now. I understand what most of you say/comment about using the tube/train etc... I don't know, I might even think it's the "proper" way to move around London, after living there for some time... it's true however that I will try to avoid it as much as possible! It's ok I guess when you're young, and you mess around, and don't care much about being in a crowded place etc (as I used to be when younger), but once you grow older, you prefer your convenience than anything else... Of course, as you say, if it will take me 1 hour to drive 10 miles, I might even think it's not worth it, and decide to take tube/trains, etc... but I read somewhere that during the morning rush hour, in order to actually get into the tube/train, you may have to spend 10-15 minutes! Honestly, I don't know if it's true or not, but I'm not "willing" to do that... can't I use this time to drive for example? Does it sound so illogical? I guess only time will show...
So, let me ask you this... what about Enfield? I was told that I will be able to find a place as the one asking, in around that area... is it a safe, nice neighborhood?
Many thanks gentlemen and ladies
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jacketpotato
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#27
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#27
(Original post by Eclipsegr)
I'm moving to London with my wife and dog, so I'm looking at something different that most of you I guess. The point is not to get what you would expect one to want, but to get info on points I've asked... that's the point of this board anyways, isn't it?
That's why I'm looking for a decent place, with a garden (even if small), etc... If I have to drive 30 or so minutes out of London in order to find such a place, in a good price (good price of course is again subjective), I will do so. So, clear with that for those with no brains; luckily they seem to be very few!

Ok, let's get to the point now. I understand what most of you say/comment about using the tube/train etc... I don't know, I might even think it's the "proper" way to move around London, after living there for some time... it's true however that I will try to avoid it as much as possible! It's ok I guess when you're young, and you mess around, and don't care much about being in a crowded place etc (as I used to be when younger), but once you grow older, you prefer your convenience than anything else... Of course, as you say, if it will take me 1 hour to drive 10 miles, I might even think it's not worth it, and decide to take tube/trains, etc... but I read somewhere that during the morning rush hour, in order to actually get into the tube/train, you may have to spend 10-15 minutes! Honestly, I don't know if it's true or not, but I'm not "willing" to do that... can't I use this time to drive for example? Does it sound so illogical? I guess only time will show...
With respect, I still think you are being a little naive about the driving. Pretty much EVERYONE going to central London takes the train or tube into work and uses it to travel about - young or old. This includes partners at top law firms.

I suppose you could drive, but be prepared to take a lot of extra time. Also remember that you can expect to pay £8 per day for the congestion charge, and that there will almost certainly be a tube stop much closer to where you want to get to than a parking place. You also need to be aware that there probably won't be convenient parking near to the firm you get a job at if you work in central London, though of course you have all sorts of options as to where you work.


So, let me ask you this... what about Enfield? I was told that I will be able to find a place as the one asking, in around that area... is it a safe, nice neighborhood?
Many thanks gentlemen and ladies
Enfield is reasonably nice. It has a couple of stations on the Piccadilly line which will take you into central London in about 25minutes, with trains coming to the station every 3minutes at peak times. At a guess, it would probably take you about an hour to drive into central London on the north side, maybe more, a lot longer to get to the south side.
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SevenStars
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#28
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#28
I personally don't like Enfield, it feels a bit like the back of beyond to me...and the three tube stations aren't actually IN Enfield, and aren't particularly close either - unless you're on the outskirts of Enfield itself (ie closer to Wood Green). And, with all due respect to JP, the TFL journey planner has the journey from Enfield (Civic Centre - to use a central point) to Liverpool Street (another centralish point) at between 56 mins and 66 mins...and for comparisons sake, it lists my regular journey as being 27-28 mins, when it actually takes 40 mins, so I think you can safely add 10-20 minutes to the time frames given by TFL.

By contrast I know that part of the driving journey from Enfield (on the North Circular) to City Road, only takes 15 minutes at 7 am in the morning...and I know this, because I used to drive using part of that stretch of road for seven years for work purposes (still use it now but not during rush hours). My entire journey from West London to Islington took between 25 minutes and 90 minutes depending on the time of day. The backslide of that was that leaving even 5 minutes later than my usual leaving time, meant that the journey time increased by at least two times. It was ridiculous...and if you really want to travel into London by car you have to be quite disciplined to leave at a fixed time EVERY day. The return journey for me was easier if it took place at 4 pm, or after 6:30 pm...anything in between those times made the journey longer by anything between 40-80 mins...meaning total travel time of up to two hours.

The same journey on the tube took around 70 mins.

My current journey is as listed above: 40 mins on the tube. The reason I don't take my car is because parking in London, where my university is, is around 4 pounds per hour (at the cheapest pay and display roadside parking) and limited to 4 hours, and there is, of course, the congestion charge. There is plenty of space mind you, because most Londoners don't want to pay those prices! But, more importantly than that, petrol costs are TWICE as expensive as they used to be, and it therefore costs twice as much to fill my car up now as it does to buy a weekly travel card (with 30% student discount). The costs of petrol will continue to increase as indicated in the Budget this week. Do not underestimate the use of petrol when sitting in London traffic not actually going anywhere!

Of course, it is entirely possible to drive in and out of London daily, but it's stressful...more so than having to put up with the tube (which is stressful in itself). I know, because I did it for years on the basis that I liked being in my own car, and knowing who'd sat in the seat before me! I get exactly what you mean about being older and not wanting to use public transport...I'm probably older than you! But I'm a Londoner and using the tube (or cycling) is the sensible way to get about.

Incidentally, if you're planning on renting property, you might find it difficult to get a lease that allows you to have pets, even if the property comes with a garden. Lots of landlords don't want the additional problems pets bring, and automatically prohibit them in the lease.

Lastly I realise that you probably didn't mean to be dismissive of those who have responded to you so far, but beyond understanding being "older" and not wanting to squash onto a tube, age isn't really much of a factor when it comes to knowing the best way to travel in London...it comes from being a Londoner, and that's the case whatever age you are.
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Eclipsegr
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#29
Report Thread starter 8 years ago
#29
Thank you Jacketpotato and Sevenstars; probably the most useful replies that far!
Will reply soon...
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airconditionednightmare
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#30
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#30
I just got back from a few days in London and went to the BPP in Holborn, have to say I really liked that area. Didn't go to Waterloo though so can't compare but I'd definitely not sniff at studying in Holborn just for the location, don't really know about anything else.
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bestfootie
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#31
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#31
Hi

Have you considered BPP Leeds / Manchester?

BPP Leeds is a good place to be. Rents are SIGNIFICANTLY lower. There are some great staff. Lovely plush offices. The courses are even cheaper. If you're into nightlife Leeds is the best city for all that outside of London and during term time you will have fun. It also the legal capital of the UK outside of London.

The only potential disadvantage I can think of is that in London one is literally surrounded by city law firms and maybe they have more contact and do more careers talks due to the proximity (if that is the type of firm you want to work for anyway - think long and carefully about such a decision anyway!). But one pays about £1,000-£2,000 premium in course fees for that small privilege and it may pay to do some serious research into Leeds.
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blinkbelle
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#32
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#32
(Original post by bestfootie)
Hi

Have you considered BPP Leeds / Manchester?

'snip'
It depends on where you want to secure a TC though - a major disadvantage of studying outside the City is that you're less likely to secure a City TC xx
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bestfootie
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#33
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#33
It depends on where you want to secure a TC though - a major disadvantage of studying outside the City is that you're less likely to secure a City TC xx
Why do you say that? Where is the evidence for that suggestion? There is definitely a disadvantage in the sense that a person is not around those firms but in terms of applications it is exactly the same application process (all done online) and all the evidence I have read suggests it is immaterial where a person does their training contract. It is different in that way from university where it does matter which university a person went to.
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blinkbelle
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#34
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#34
(Original post by bestfootie)
Why do you say that? Where is the evidence for that suggestion? There is definitely a disadvantage in the sense that a person is not around those firms but in terms of applications it is exactly the same application process (all done online) and all the evidence I have read suggests it is immaterial where a person does their training contract. It is different in that way from university where it does matter which university a person went to.
Because when City firms need volunteers for recruitment events they go straight to the local law students @ Uni & postgrad colleges.

Also, the college you go to will have local links with firms so if you want to work in London, go to a college in London & you may have a shoe in. xx

PS. quote me directly next time, :rolleyes: kthxbai
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