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    I started aged 5, using M-BASIC on an Osborne system!
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    I started programming BASIC on the Commodore 64 in the early 1990's (probably 10 years old).

    To become "experienced" in Visual Basic 6 took around 6 months. Around 3 months when upgrading this to VB .NET.

    Assembler for embedded systems can be learned in a few months whereas assembler for Windows is another kettle of fish.

    It took about 6 months again to learn C for embedded systems, after 2 years on and off I can code in it as if it was my first language.

    So yea, I guess you can become proficient in a language in about 6 months as long as you know how to look in data sheets and other literature for techniques you don't know off by heart.

    I would never class my self as an expert in any language though as there is always someone worth aspiring to be as good as.

    (Original post by Chrosson)
    Sorry? You learned basic at the same time as assembler? Talk about a range of languages!
    The Commodore 64 was based around an 8 bit processor called the 6510. When you first turned it on, it booted into a BASIC interpreter that you could tap code into and run straight from the off. It was also possible to put the machine into an assembly language mode where you entered mnemonics directly.

    Because the actual workings of the machine (memory address' and registers) was the same in both languages, many people became proficient in both at the same time.

    There is not such a great difference between ASM and BASIC anyway, nor any other language really.
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    Perhaps proving that you're never too old to start learning something if you have a head for it (I'm 34), I just started teaching myself coding end of last year. I started with HTML and currently studying ASP and it still a work in progress. I figure it could go good with main interest, Graphic Design.
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    I started learning C#/Java/VB.NET when I was 12 but I did HTML+CSS before then.
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    First started typing in BBC Basic games into our BBC microcomputer, aged 11.

    Started actually making my own programs in Visual Basic at school, aged 16. Made a database-driven adventure game, and a linked list library. Then learned the basics of C in the summer holidays aged 17.

    Now I'm 27 and am wondering where my life went. lol
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    I started programming at about age 12, like most through gaming/online gaming and forums. I learn't HTML, the basics of PHP, MySQL ect.. and created a gaming related forum at 13. Even made some money! =D Since then Ive studied Python, Vb.net and Java. I'd say im pretty fluent in vb.net but lacking in 'industry/practical experience'. I'm currently studying vb.net further with a level Computing.
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    Around age 11/12 I think, (Can't remember what age exactly, first year of High School I think). I first was shown what HTML as an extra in an IT class since I'd finished the other work... I just typed in what the teacher gave me on a sheet verbatim. I was pretty amazed at what I'd done really, that this simple plain text actually meant something.

    I then learnt started to program games using "Game Maker", and also a little in "The Games Factory" (Not really programming, it's drag and drop!).

    I finally got bored of Game Maker, and since I wanted to write 3D games, and at that point Game Maker was just getting 3D support, but it was slow and lacking in features, I learn't DarkBASIC since I thought it was better for this sort of task.

    Fast forward 1-2 years and I learnt VB6 for AS/A2 Computing (I didn't actually mind it, once you get it's intricacies memorized!), and Python in my spare time.

    When I got to University (2008) I learnt Java, Haskell, C (I did learn this before DarkBASIC but not that well, mainly just for SDL) and C++. I think Haskell is quickly becoming my language of choice, but I still like Python for small projects.

    Also between all these I've learnt PHP, small amounts of Ruby, (very small) amounts of Prolog and other languages. If I could give you one piece of advice: don't think in a language if at all possible, think in higher level constructs and apply those to the language your using. (I'm guessing any half-proficient programmer does this anyway)
 
 
 
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