Where do LSE postgraduates come from? Watch

Tarutaru
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#21
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#21
... let me state it once again... the ratios given on the webpage are between the ACTUAL NUMBER OF ENROLLMENT and the number of application.

Even for the MSc Finance and MSc Economics, the school gives out hundreds of offers... many of them could not meet the requirement or could not pay for the fees... and many of them decline LSE go to less expensive colleges...
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Tarutaru
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#22
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That is an intentionally deceiving trick of the school for making itself looks more impressive...
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Tarutaru
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#23
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If you have no personal experience of the school, just make a simple calculation. The ratio for the MSc Finance is 46/1790, making many idiots saying the admission rate is 2% (Search the forum for evidence)....

Make a simple calculation, the entry requirement of the MSc Finance at LSE is NOT higher than that at Cambridge or Oxford or other top universities in the US. I assume that many of the people applying to Cambridge and Oxford also apply to LSE and that those people got admitted into Cambridge and Oxford also got admitted into LSE. Following this reasoning, you will understand that those people saying that admission rate for the Finance is 2% is totally absurd.
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cpl.fir
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#24
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(Original post by Tarutaru)
If you have no personal experience of the school, just make a simple calculation. The ratio for the MSc Finance is something like 60/1700, making many idiots saying the admission rate is 2%....

Make a simple calculation, the entry requirement of the MSc Finance at LSE is NOT higher than that at Cambridge or Oxford or other top universities in the US. I assume that many of the people applying to Cambridge and Oxford also apply to LSE and that those people got admitted into Cambridge and Oxford also got admitted into LSE. Following this reasoning, you will understand that those people saying that admission rate for the Finance is 2% is totally absurd.
So it's 3.5% then? A simple calculation of 60/1700 is actually not 2%. :eek3: So yes, those who said that are idiots.
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Tarutaru
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#25
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(Original post by cpl.fir)
So it's 3.5% then? A simple calculation of 60/1700 is actually not 2%. :eek3: So yes, those who said that are idiots.
oh my god... can you actually read the full sentence please???... I said "some thing like", which means approximately 60/1700...

the actual figure is 46/1790..., and SOME THING LIKE 2%...

Can those people keep saying offer/application or admission/application (search the forum for evidence) stop spreading rubbish and deceiving others and youself please?
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cpl.fir
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#26
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(Original post by Tarutaru)
oh my god... can you actually read the full sentence please???... I said "some thing like", which means approximately 60/1700...

the actual figure is 46/1790..., and SOME THING LIKE 2%...

Can those people keep saying offer/application or admission/application stop spreading rubbish and deceiving others and youself please?
2% and 3.5% is a huge difference to a lot of people. LSE says 'intake/application'. I don't see what the fuss is about.
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Tarutaru
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#27
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Yes, I totally agree with you 2% and 3.5% is a huge difference... I should have made it very precise when I wrote the post. Ok, I have edited.
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Tarutaru
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#28
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(Original post by cpl.fir)
2% and 3.5% is a huge difference to a lot of people. LSE says 'intake/application'. I don't see what the fuss is about.
The fuss is about intentionally deceiving applicants... why? many idiots in this forum saying "offer/application", "admission/application", not even the word "intake/application" used by the school

LSE gives out hundreds of offers for the MSc Finance or MSc Economics, although I don't have the exact figures to back up...

But if take into account those who could not pay for the fees or who decline their offers, the Offer/Application ratio or admission/application ratio should definitely be over 50% (my subjective yet conservative estimation). The indirect evidence is that, although LSE MSc Economics is one of the best in the country, it is still open for admission... despite the application for other top programs (e.g. UCL, Cambridge, Oxford) are all closed...
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cpl.fir
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#29
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(Original post by Tarutaru)
The fuss is about intentionally deceiving applicants... why? many idiots in this forum saying "offer/application", "admission/application", not even the word "intake/application" used by the school

LSE gives out hundreds of offers for the MSc Finance or MSc Economics, although I don't have the exact figures to back up...

But if take into account those who could not pay for the fees or who decline their offers, the Offer/Application ratio or admission/application ratio should definitely be over 50% (my subjective yet conservative estimation). The indirect evidence is that, although LSE MSc Economics is one of the best in the country, it is still open for admission... despite the application for other top programs (e.g. UCL, Cambridge, Oxford) are all closed...
Well, people choose to believe what they want to believe. Nobody can stop them. The best source of information is always from the school. We can speculate and poke around at the admissions process, but in the end, only that certain breed of people actually enroll into these programmes. Indeed, the course fees are punishing and that the Graduate Support Scheme is skimpy.
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cyyuenangie
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#30
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(Original post by Tarutaru)
The fuss is about intentionally deceiving applicants... why? many idiots in this forum saying "offer/application", "admission/application", not even the word "intake/application" used by the school

LSE gives out hundreds of offers for the MSc Finance or MSc Economics, although I don't have the exact figures to back up...

But if take into account those who could not pay for the fees or who decline their offers, the Offer/Application ratio or admission/application ratio should definitely be over 50% (my subjective yet conservative estimation). The indirect evidence is that, although LSE MSc Economics is one of the best in the country, it is still open for admission... despite the application for other top programs (e.g. UCL, Cambridge, Oxford) are all closed...
haha your subjective estimation...i hope your estimation still have some ground. i think they are still open becox they keep choosing the best best students. my subjective estimation
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Sasha_pt
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#31
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#31
(Original post by Tarutaru)
The indirect evidence is that, although LSE MSc Economics is one of the best in the country, it is still open for admission... despite the application for other top programs
The implication is not correct. LSE uses "rolling admissions" which is very confusing, because in reality if you apply late, your chances will be considerably lower even if the web-page claims the programme still to be open. There is an approximate number of places for each degree, and once it is filled, that's it, unless you are a very good candidate.

So, this piece of information is not informative at all.

The other statement (about giving away hundreds of offers for top degrees) is also implausible. I don't know the numbers, but I believe the ratio of accepted offers to offers should be high.
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Tarutaru
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#32
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(Original post by Sasha_pt)
The implication is not correct. LSE uses "rolling admissions" which is very confusing, because in reality if you apply late, your chances will be considerably lower even if the web-page claims the programme still to be open. There is an approximate number of places for each degree, and once it is filled, that's it, unless you are a very good candidate.

So, this piece of information is not informative at all.

The other statement (about giving away hundreds of offers for top degrees) is also implausible. I don't know the numbers, but I believe the ratio of accepted offers to offers should be high.
I have nothing more to say... My statement is based on my personal experience so it is totally subjective...

by th way, Sasha_Pt... It seems like you really like the school... but from your posts, it seems like you could not get a place at LSE for your MSc Economics... you got rejected? or did you decline your offer and thinking to do a MRes there because the fee is cheaper?
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Tarutaru
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#33
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Oh, I see! you got rejected by MSc Economics but got a distinction for a MSc Economics in a good UK uni and then got admitted into MSc Finance and Economics at LSE...

That is the power of the LSE brand... Yes, I know many people want to get into the school at all cost
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Dirac Delta Function
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#34
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Is a PhD genuinely competitive, academically? I would have thought they got high quality students for PhDs.
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Tarutaru
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#35
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(Original post by Sasha_pt)
The implication is not correct. LSE uses "rolling admissions" which is very confusing, because in reality if you apply late, your chances will be considerably lower even if the web-page claims the programme still to be open. There is an approximate number of places for each degree, and once it is filled, that's it, unless you are a very good candidate.

So, this piece of information is not informative at all.

The other statement (about giving away hundreds of offers for top degrees) is also implausible. I don't know the numbers, but I believe the ratio of accepted offers to offers should be high.
Why so many idoits lack the basic statistical reasoning to figure it out e.g. 85/1347 (the MSc Finance and Economics) is actually a statistical swindling???? The 1347 given on the website is double counting the number of first choice and second choice applicants. Please try to use your brain to figure out a simple statistical problem. Oxford MSc Financial Economics is the best program of this kind in Europe and this program admits about 100 students a year. A very conservative estimation, if 50% or 50 students (can be up to 100% as nobody would not diversify their application portfolio) of Oxford MSc Finacnial Economics also apply to LSE and got admitted into LSE(without doubt as requirement of Oxford is much much more stringent), then the 85 "offers" certainly include these 50 students. If these 50 students declined LSE and go to Oxford, then there will be only 35 students in the LSe MSc finance and Economics. If Sasha_Pt or something is really a student doing Msc Finance and Economics at LSe then you will certainly now that the number of student is over 100...In other words, the 85/1347 is statistical swindling for fooling those idiots who are protecting the brand value and their investmetn here...

Following the same reasoning, if 50% of the students at Cambridge Mphil Finance, LBS Finance, Oxford Finance and Economics, and other similar programs at MIT, Stanford, Columbia, etc also applied to LSE and got admitted (very reasonable), then my statement that LSE gives out hundreds of offers is not an overstatement...not to mention the large number of offer holders who lack the finance and keep delaying their entry (search the forum for evidence)

I totally understand why many idiots like to protect the brand value by mesmerizing themselves to convince that the "Intake/Application" is actually "Offer/Application" or "Admission Application"...


Luckily, I don't think the MScs at LSE even worth the application fees, although MRes/Phd is still quite attractive :P
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Tarutaru
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(Original post by Dirac Delta Function)
Is a PhD genuinely competitive, academically? I would have thought they got high quality students for PhDs.
Yes, very very competitive at the highest level but a lot lot cheaper with very good funding opportunities.
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Tarutaru
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#37
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(Original post by Sasha_pt)
The implication is not correct. LSE uses "rolling admissions" which is very confusing, because in reality if you apply late, your chances will be considerably lower even if the web-page claims the programme still to be open. There is an approximate number of places for each degree, and once it is filled, that's it, unless you are a very good candidate.

So, this piece of information is not informative at all.

The other statement (about giving away hundreds of offers for top degrees) is also implausible. I don't know the numbers, but I believe the ratio of accepted offers to offers should be high.
Next time, before replying to my post, could you please use your mathematical and statistical reasoning you learned at LSE or the good university to think first? it is really annoying for me to keep clarifying myself
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cyyuenangie
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#38
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#38
(Original post by Tarutaru)
Why so many idoits lack the basic statistical reasoning to figure it out e.g. 85/1347 (the MSc Finance and Economics) is actually a statistical swindling???? The 1347 given on the website is double counting the number of first choice and second choice applicants. Please try to use your brain to figure out a simple statistical problem. Oxford MSc Financial Economics is the best program of this kind in Europe and this program admits about 100 students a year. A very conservative estimation, if 50% or 50 students (can be up to 100% as nobody would not diversify their application portfolio) of Oxford MSc Finacnial Economics also apply to LSE and got admitted into LSE(without doubt as requirement of Oxford is much much more stringent), then the 85 "offers" certainly include these 50 students. If these 50 students declined LSE and go to Oxford, then there will be only 35 students in the LSe MSc finance and Economics. If Sasha_Pt or something is really a student doing Msc Finance and Economics at LSe then you will certainly now that the number of student is over 100...In other words, the 85/1347 is statistical swindling for fooling those idiots who are protecting the brand value and their investmetn here...

Following the same reasoning, if 50% of the students at Cambridge Mphil Finance, LBS Finance, Oxford Finance and Economics, and other similar programs at MIT, Stanford, Columbia, etc also applied to LSE and got admitted (very reasonable), then my statement that LSE gives out hundreds of offers is not an overstatement...not to mention the large number of offer holders who lack the finance and keep delaying their entry (search the forum for evidence)

I totally understand why many idiots like to protect the brand value by mesmerizing themselves to convince that the "Intake/Application" is actually "Offer/Application" or "Admission Application"...


Luckily, I don't think the MScs at LSE even worth the application fees, although MRes/Phd is still quite attractive :P
i do agree your good statistics skill..you are absoultely right.
but you have fundamentally biased assumption that:

1. student applying to Cambridge, oxford, mit. LBS also apply LSE
2. The student apply to these schools together and got the offer will simply rejected LSE.

If your assumption is correct, the worst school in uk will have the highest instake/application ratio. But i cannot see that.
also, i cannot see anyone here idiot, please stop to use this word to the user here. it is very very low..and i cannot see what qualification you have saying that towards other students here.
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Sasha_pt
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#39
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#39
(Original post by Tarutaru)
Oh, I see! you got rejected by MSc Economics but got a distinction for a MSc Economics in a good UK uni and then got admitted into MSc Finance and Economics at LSE...

That is the power of the LSE brand... Yes, I know many people want to get into the school at all cost
Eh, I was not rejected for MSc Economics at LSE In fact, I have never applied for it. And I am not a student at LSE at the moment.

Regarding you later comment, I never said anything about computing the ratio of intake to applications and using it as a proof of something. As the website reports intakes, and not offers, your further discussion of offers to applications ratio is irrelevant. If you want to say that offers considerably exceed intake, well, I don't think so, but there is no real evidence to prove or disprove it.

I just said that the fact that LSE was still accepting applications was not informative at all in this discussion. Please be careful!
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Sasha_pt
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#40
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#40
(Original post by cyyuenangie)
If your assumption is correct, the worst school in uk will have the highest instake/application ratio. But i cannot see that.
I think intake to applications is informative of the difficulty of getting in conditional on average student profile applying for this university. There are very bad universities, which are hard to get into based on the intake ratio, - this is simply because they receive many applications from weak students who do not even compete with better students. So, the "markets" are different despite some overlap.
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