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Choosing to go to ARU over LSE - right or wrong? watch

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    (Original post by najinaji)
    :toofunny:
    Yeah this time I meant it. :p:
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    Oh my ******* days, you cannot be serious.
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    (Original post by Diaz89)
    Oh my ******* days, you cannot be serious.
    About what?

    And...
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    (Original post by a.posteriori)
    Math is seen as a good field to study. It's rigorous, and it can lead to good salary after graduation (what I would consider a good career). Similarly, LSE is seen as a very good place to study.

    On the other hand, optometry is not generally regarded as being a particularly prestigious field to enter - particularly because it's commonly assumed that anyone with the ability to do so would prefer an education as an ophthalmologist instead. And compared to LSE, Anglia Ruskin is not widely regarded as a prestigious or top-class university.
    Except in the UK it's different because to become an opthalmologist you have to go into medicine I'm lead to believe.
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    I've probably already given you my opinion on this, but as the topic interests me quite a lot, I think I may just think aloud on here about it, as it is rather therapeutic. I usually get some similarly odd questions about the nature of my university and subject choices, and the confusion usually arises because people have very different perceptions of satisfaction. I.e. I know some people would never be satisfied with a degree that did not immediately present them with a clear, affluent career at the end of it, and would be more than willing to sacrifice enjoyment to ensure they achieve that goal.

    Of course, there's nothing wrong with that, but that just wasn't what I was after from university - I wanted to study something I personally found interesting. Partly because I had no idea what I wanted to do at seventeen. I'm amazed so many people do! But anyway, I've had a great time on my course, and among other things, it's given me time to assess what it is I really want to do. And so this summer, I'm putting in my application for Medicine. And lo and behold, no admissions tutor has cared in the slightest where I happened to study for undergrad, so long as I reel in good marks - which is no problem for me given that I'm into my degree subject!

    So all in all, my opinion on this would always be study what you enjoy, not what others think you should study.
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    (Original post by Jack.O)
    I've probably already given you my opinion on this, but as the topic interests me quite a lot, I think I may just think aloud on here about it, as it is rather therapeutic. I usually get some similarly odd questions about the nature of my university and subject choices, and the confusion usually arises because people have very different perceptions of satisfaction. I.e. I know some people would never be satisfied with a degree that did not immediately present them with a clear, affluent career at the end of it, and would be more than willing to sacrifice enjoyment to ensure they achieve that goal.

    Of course, there's nothing wrong with that, but that just wasn't what I was after from university - I wanted to study something I personally found interesting. Partly because I had no idea what I wanted to do at seventeen. I'm amazed so many people do! But anyway, I've had a great time on my course, and among other things, it's given me time to assess what it is I really want to do. And so this summer, I'm putting in my application for Medicine. And lo and behold, no admissions tutor has cared in the slightest where I happened to study for undergrad, so long as I reel in good marks - which is no problem for me given that I'm into my degree subject!

    So all in all, my opinion on this would always be study what you enjoy, not what others think you should study.
    Oh wow, I didn't know you were planning on applying to study medicine. :eek: Do you want to do the full undergrad course of the four-year graduate entry one? Know where you're planning on applying to?
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    (Original post by TheSownRose)
    Oh wow, I didn't know you were planning on applying to study medicine. :eek: Do you want to do the full undergrad course of the four-year graduate entry one? Know where you're planning on applying to?
    Currently I'm looking at Newcastle, Dundee and King's, though the favourite so far would have to be UEA. I was lucky enough to pin down their admissions tutor on their open day a month or so ago, and she was incredibly encouraging. I'm after the five year options mainly, as I haven't actually had a need to take out a student loan yet, so it would be fairly manageable to do the 5 year from a financial perspective.

    Thank you for the interest!
 
 
 
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