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Value of English degree to employers... watch

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    (Original post by Bramlow)
    What does this mean though, really?

    You have to appreciate the difference between short-term and long-term objectives. I might want to study Philosophy as a degree but want to become an Economist at the Treasury for a career. Pursuing the former may debar me from the latter.

    It also annoys me how people casually toss around the line "you can always do a postgrad". It's as if they were saying "you can always get a refund if you don't like your purchase from TKMaxx".

    Unlike a TKMaxx refund, however, a Postgrad entails:
    - a year of your life
    - A near-certain financial commitment of £10k or more

    You also can't 'always' do one, since getting accepted onto a good course is by no means guaranteed.
    But you said yourself that you want to study English?? :confused:
    Or did I misread something.
    But if you're so against postgrad, then how about gaining work experience in business whilst you study English?
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    (Original post by Umbrella.Girl)
    But you said yourself that you want to study English?? :confused:
    Or did I misread something.
    But if you're so against postgrad, then how about gaining work experience in business whilst you study English?
    Yeah, that is an option. But I think the problem lies in the fact this experience probably won't stand up when compared to those who have degrees in Maths, Physics, Economics etc...

    I have, however, found this rather encouraging information on Investment Banking on this very forum.

    "Due to different natures of the business, it is possible to enter Banking with a variety of degrees. Examples from this very forum include Economics, Politics and even Geography. Corporate Finance and Sales roles tend to be filled by graduates from all kinds of degrees including Arts, where as the majority of Trading and Quant positions are taken by people who have completed degrees with a substantial Mathematical element in them. These degrees usually include Economics, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Engineering, and Accounting & Finance."

    Now I don't pretend to be an expert on Investment Banking... Perhaps someone could help me here...
    Do the jobs available to arts students as specified here offer worse pay than the jobs with a more mathematical orientation?

    Thanks
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    (Original post by Bramlow)
    Not quite yet, but the wheels are very much in motion. I think it's safe to say that the pension won't be great by the time people entering the service now reach retirement age.

    You wouldn't believe the perks this guy got, though. Anybody who's anybody in the FCO gets what's known as a 'boarding school allowance'. It enables you to fund as many children as you have to go to a top boarding school, all paid for by the FCO. Many of the senior staff earn less every year than this allowance pays out.
    FCO? :p:
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    (Original post by ElemenT')
    FCO? :p:
    Foreign and Commonwealth Office? :confused:
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    (Original post by Bramlow)
    Off the top of my head I'd say Cameron's on about £175,000. It's in that sort of ballpark.

    Gus O'Donell, who leads the civil service - and get to sign his memos as 'GOD' - is on a similar amount.

    However, the vast majority of even senior civil servants are on nothing like this. I met the head of policy for South Asia at the FCO once. This guy leads our diplomatic missions in the whole Afghanistan/Pakistan region, and was only on around £60k.

    Nice pension, but don't expect it to remain that way by the time you're 65.
    Epic initials are epic. :cool:
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    an english degree is a good degree. a proper academic subject. and great literature will teach you about life and lead hopefully to you devloping a great prose style. yes, you'll be all set to be a winner!
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    (Original post by JoshW7)
    Corporate Finance and Sales roles tend to be filled by graduates from all kinds of degrees including Arts,
    well the more compelx products require quite soem maths understanding even in sales. without at least A-Level maths, you will struggle a lot if you want to work in Markets, even Sales,
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    (Original post by KLL)
    well the more compelx products require quite soem maths understanding even in sales. without at least A-Level maths, you will struggle a lot if you want to work in Markets, even Sales,
    Well I should have a Maths A level; I'm not doing English because I can't do Maths.
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    (Original post by JoshW7)
    Well I should have a Maths A level; I'm not doing English because I can't do Maths.
    wasn't implying that you couldn't. i don't knwo that much about A-levels but i am to udnerstand that not everybody takes A-level maths, espcialy if they want to study somethign like English
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    Finance is credible? :rolleyes:
 
 
 
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