Fit, but struggle with running? Watch

reems23
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#21
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#21
Don't push yourself to a point where it becomes painful and you become miserable, it'll just be a disincentive and you won't bother with doing it again. Every day run a little bit longer. A month ago I couldn't run a mile without collapsing, I can run 4 miles fairly easily now. I'd suggest doing an extra fifth of a mile every day but do whatever you find most comfortable. :bandit: Good luck woman.
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Narik
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#22
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#22
I've never had this problem - I think it's because I've been running since I was 6 years old. :teehee: However, you're definitely not the only one. I see other guys and girls who do just as much sports as I do, yet they suck at running. I think you need a heck of a lot of stamina and endurance for running. If you keep training, you'll only improve and this issue will resolve itself. :dontknow: So just keep at it...that's all you can do.
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Libtolu
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#23
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#23
running sucks anyway .
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PapaShmurff
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#24
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#24
I'm pretty unfit but can outrun most people lol
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Jessaay!
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#25
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#25
(Original post by addylad)
Have you done a structured core strength routine 3/4 times a week for three months?
Yep. Well when you say that, I tend to do a routine we were given by an ex-olympic rower for the women's 8 category in the evening, and then before the term finished it was row twice a week, go to the gym at least twice a week and circuits once a week. So my core should be fine.
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Jessaay!
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#26
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#26
(Original post by machiavelli123)
You use different muscle groups when you're running to when your biking/rowing. Running is the most intense cardio excercise I belive. You fairly often see relatively chubby unfit people being able to cycle for miles, but rarely do you see such people running for more than a mile or so.
Well I doubt you'd see them rowing for miles :p: I don't think it's a problem with my cardio fitness, but just muscle groups and the fact I'm not used to it at all. I doubt at the moment I'd be able to even run for a mile.
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munn
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#27
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#27
(Original post by DH-Biker)
I'm the same. I don't think its anything to worry about.
I'm 6:4 and I can cycle, swim, jog and play games like football with no real hassle.
However, when it comes to running, I can only do a flat out 100 meter sprint and then I'm bushed.
I've got really long legs in proportion to my hieght so I can sprint like hell, but when it comes to things like 200, 800 and 1000 meters I just cant go any ways past 100 really and have to jog it.


I...
I.....

the 200m maybe, but 400, 800 and 1000 metres are not all about doing a flat out sprint. Maybe that's where you're going wrong
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rufus_da_bear
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#28
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#28
its one of those things you have to persevere with if you want to be able to do it. I used to be terrible, couldnt run down the road, but could happily go on a 20 mile bike ride, so i started jogging with a friend and walking if it got to hard, and stuck with it, and now i can run about 5 miles (although, thats 5 slow miles and if theres too many hills ill still have to rest at some point running is hard)
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IQ Test
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#29
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#29
(Original post by Apocalyptic Fish)
I feel exactly the same - I'm fine when I cycle, swim, whatever, but I struggle to run for decent lengths
This sounds quite like me!

OP: What sort of distances do you normally run? I find that I'm a reasonably good distance runner or sprinter (often 3rd/4th place runner), but in sports day I lost our 400m race because it's neither long nor short distance. Maybe this is your problem too?

Maybe do the M.S.F test (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-stage_fitness_test) with your fitness trainer once a month, and try to improve your score little by little? It improves your motivation as well as your cardiovascular ability.

Okay, hope that wasn't too useless, good luck! =)
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DH-Biker
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#30
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#30
(Original post by munn)
I...
I.....

the 200m maybe, but 400, 800 and 1000 metres are not all about doing a flat out sprint. Maybe that's where you're going wrong
Haha, you should see some of the lads and lasses at our school then :p:
Most can flat out sprint the 400, and one can pretty much sprint the whole 1 km. He's army through and through though, well he's training for the SAS or something.
The first and last sections of those distances are, that's what I meant.
Everyone runs either at the start or at the end (usually the start, and then lose all their energy).
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munn
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#31
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#31
(Original post by DH-Biker)
Haha, you should see some of the lads and lasses at our school then :p:
Most can flat out sprint the 400, and one can pretty much sprint the whole 1 km. He's army through and through though, well he's training for the SAS or something.
The first and last sections of those distances are, that's what I meant.
Everyone runs either at the start or at the end (usually the start, and then lose all their energy).
well you should be running fast, but not sprinting, probably around 85-90% of your top speed is ideal, whereas surely with a sprint you're aiming for 100%
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DH-Biker
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#32
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#32
(Original post by munn)
well you should be running fast, but not sprinting, probably around 85-90% of your top speed is ideal, whereas surely with a sprint you're aiming for 100%
Hmm, you're probably right! I don't do much running anyway to be fair. I'm a biker and a swimmer. Running I leave to certain situations that call for it. :p:
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cocomango
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#33
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#33
(Original post by Jessaay!)
I can row (indoor and on water) with absolutely no issue, same with bikes etc, yet when it comes to running I find myself breathless and tired out within probably about 3 and a half minutes maximum? Any advice? Do I just panic (I hate the feeling of being breathless and I get tight chested a lot in general so when I'm running sometimes I feel a little vulnerable to getting a tight chest again) or am I doing something completely wrong?
Since you row I am going to make a couple of assumptions in that you are taller and therefore weigh more than the average female and that you probably have a pretty strong posterior chain, core and legs.

Swimming, rowing and cycling are all technical, but so is running. I've heard that you want to be light on your feet, make sure you carry a continuous breathing rhythm and avoid thinking directly about the running - try and keep a clear mind. Drop the shoulders and avoid excessive lateral rotation of your trunk. It's good to try and pre-fill your muscles and liver with glycogen stores several hours before you run. Work up to doing lots more running as you are able to. It's usually better to increase the frequency of running sessions than heavily increasing the duration/intensity all at once. The body's adaptation to training is very specific to imposed demand, but you should progress quite quickly to begin with since you are untrained as a runner.

Something to be wary of is shin splints. Work your way up conservatively based on your ability and there shouldn't be a problem. Connective tissue remodelling and changes in bone denisty need time to adapt; a good running shoe to help cushion the impact against concrete is good. I recommend running on grass wherever possible though.

Hope you find some of that helpful.
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Ewan
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#34
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#34
I had the same problem. Can't really give a solution other than you'll have to start from the bottom again. You should progress faster though because your already fit. I guess its probably to do with different muscle groups, and remember that neither rowing, nor cycling are impact sports like running is.
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EskimoJo
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#35
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#35
I'm the opposite! A natural runner, but crap at everything else. I'm going to start climbing when I return to Uni!
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EskimoJo
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#36
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#36
(Original post by RainyB)
I have always had asthma (quite seriously when I was a child), but have, due to that, kept myself quite physically fit. I have no problem doing any kind of training (spinning, pilates, cardio, weights, anything really) apart from running.

Running has always made me very very out of breath and abnormally tired as well as having a tight chest (which are all signs of this type of asthma, exercise induced). My doctor has done several tests regarding my problem, and it seems I either have to really really push myself in order to get a tight chest during any other kind of exercise, but with running, I'll get a tight chest after about 15 minutes of running non-stop.

Also, my asthma is very much unnoticeable unless I have to run, and it is particularly worse when running outside. It's got something to do with the way your lungs absorb different types of air humidity.

Really dunno if you might have it as I'm not a doc or anything, but its worth a look perhaps? http://www.emedicinehealth.com/exerc...article_em.htm
Maybe the impact affects your lungs?
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Kiyam
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#37
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#37
This bugged me for awhile too, so i actually tried jogging more often ( i usually avoid too much running because my anterior tibialis used to hurt alot and i get tired XD ) Swimming, cycling, rowing etc I could do for a long time.

But persistant practice helped alot and I am getting no pain now :o:

However I still cant run as long as I wish too. Still pushing for it!
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Apocalyptic Fish
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#38
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#38
(Original post by IQ Test)
This sounds quite like me!

OP: What sort of distances do you normally run? I find that I'm a reasonably good distance runner or sprinter (often 3rd/4th place runner), but in sports day I lost our 400m race because it's neither long nor short distance. Maybe this is your problem too?

Maybe do the M.S.F test (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Multi-stage_fitness_test) with your fitness trainer once a month, and try to improve your score little by little? It improves your motivation as well as your cardiovascular ability.

Okay, hope that wasn't too useless, good luck! =)
I ran the 400m in 1:14 in a games lesson last year.

And I remember doing the bleep test about a year or two ago, I achieved a Level of 7 and 10 shuttles. I could probably do a lot better now, though.

(Sorry for late reply)
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Pigeon
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#39
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#39
(Original post by Jessaay!)
As for pace, when I was quite a lot younger I used to do a lot of sprinting, and I have been told I'm quite good at it even now though I don't really do it anymore, so I think maybe my pace may be a little too inconsistent, as when I run at what feels like a natural pace I'm sprinting and definitely can't keep it up, when I'm running slower any technique probably completely collapses and I have to be conscious all the time to keep the pace lower so it probably ends up quite inconsistent.
With cycling and rowing you have props to aid your movement, so to some degree you're always going to have some momentum even if you cease pedalling/rowing. When you stop pedalling the bike doesn't suddenly come to a halt, but will still keep going and can still travel at quite a speed if you're on a hill.

With running it is entirely down to you, you propel yourself forward, and you keep yourself going, which imo makes it more difficult.
It can often be quite demotivating initially and progression can seem very slow, but don't expect to be able to run far to start with, and don't be worried about having to stop and walk.

It might be a good idea to jog/walk 1/2- 1 mile, so jog for 2 mins, walk for 2 mins, jog again etc. until you've covered the distance. Then either try to extend the distance covered with the jog/walk method, or try to run the same distance with fewer/no walk breaks. Eventually it does become easier, and then you'll be able to actually enjoy it!

Do you warm up properly? Try a 5 mins brisk walk before jogging.

Also, you've mentioned your pace and it sounds like you are running too fast to enable you to maintain that pace. Basically, the slower your pace, the further distance this can be maintained.
When racing it is common to run the first mile at a slower pace than the last, and as a general rule every second too fast at the start will add an extra 3-4 secs onto the overall time. So it's important to pace yourself whatever your level of running.

If you're serious about wanting to run then try following a beginner's guide, and as you're already fit I think you may be surprised at how much progress you'll make in a month or so. If you persevere..:p:
It's very rewarding so I highly recommend getting into running!
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Jessaay!
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#40
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#40
(Original post by Pigeon)
With cycling and rowing you have props to aid your movement, so to some degree you're always going to have some momentum even if you cease pedalling/rowing. When you stop pedalling the bike doesn't suddenly come to a halt, but will still keep going and can still travel at quite a speed if you're on a hill.

With running it is entirely down to you, you propel yourself forward, and you keep yourself going, which imo makes it more difficult.
It can often be quite demotivating initially and progression can seem very slow, but don't expect to be able to run far to start with, and don't be worried about having to stop and walk.

It might be a good idea to jog/walk 1/2- 1 mile, so jog for 2 mins, walk for 2 mins, jog again etc. until you've covered the distance. Then either try to extend the distance covered with the jog/walk method, or try to run the same distance with fewer/no walk breaks. Eventually it does become easier, and then you'll be able to actually enjoy it!

Do you warm up properly? Try a 5 mins brisk walk before jogging.

Also, you've mentioned your pace and it sounds like you are running too fast to enable you to maintain that pace. Basically, the slower your pace, the further distance this can be maintained.
When racing it is common to run the first mile at a slower pace than the last, and as a general rule every second too fast at the start will add an extra 3-4 secs onto the overall time. So it's important to pace yourself whatever your level of running.

If you're serious about wanting to run then try following a beginner's guide, and as you're already fit I think you may be surprised at how much progress you'll make in a month or so. If you persevere..:p:
It's very rewarding so I highly recommend getting into running!
Thanks, some useful information.

I see what you mean when rowing something is always there for momentum but that's not really what I'm referring to, as you can't stop during rowing, especially on a machine (which has very little momentum), if you're being timed etc so I think it's more of a case that the muscles used during rowing are different to the ones needed for rowing.

Anyway I've managed to become a little better at running just through work on the treadmill, I've come to discover my main problem is my breathing.
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