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    (Original post by W.H.T)
    Doesn't 'proof work' come up in the further pure maths modules in A-level. I'm sure in FP1, there's a chapter called 'proof by mathematical induction'.
    Proof by induction is really only the start, and that you are expected to know before starting, other proof systems we are taught include things like Hoare logic which I'm pretty sure isn't covered at A Level, as it related directly to CS - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hoare_logic

    Also, do you think the type of maths in computer science is 'fun'?
    I wouldn't say it's fun per se, but I do find it quite interesting and it's certainly used in the real world for software which requires formal proof (i.e. things which may risk life if there's a bug)



    (Original post by BigV)
    Without meaning to cause offence...... that sounds incredibly dry and boring. How are you finding the course?

    Hearing that makes me wonder if the 'computing' end of things would be better for me. I know I would rather be actually learning how to program and do the functional/operational end of things than spending time examining how and why these things work or using advanced mathematics.
    The course is great, we are taught how to program but in more of a language irrelevant way. Rather than being taught the syntax of a particular language, everything is abstracted. You do get practice of Java and Scheme in the first year still


    (Original post by BigV)
    ^ I have noticed that many posters on this site take that attitude when discussing pretty much any subject which isn't CS. Obviously you are entitled to your opinion, however I strongly disagree.

    I don't think taking Computing or Computing with Management / Business at a decent Uni is a waste of time.
    I think it depends what you want from a degree really. If you want to become a programmer then really any degree other than CS isn't really any better than no degree by itself. That's not to say a degree in Computing is a waste of time altogether, but I'd advise against it if you ultimately wish to become a programmer, or just get some experience.
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    (Original post by Nines)
    I'm on the fence to be honest. As far as games development goes, you're going to have a serious leg up on CS students, since you'll already be familiar with OpenGL & GLSL, DirectX & HLSL or XNA and how the graphics pipeline works along with various techniques for optimising the work you're doing. (frustum culling, space partitioning, collision techniques, etc.)

    The only drawback with this is that your underlying programming/hardware knowledge is going to suffer, since you'll probably end up having to sacrifice these classes to carry on with the games stuff. An example for me being missing out on concurrent programming in C#, although I'll just learn that in my own time.

    When all said and done it depends how good you are. We had about 150 or so students on our course in my year with a lot of drop-outs. Without sounding harsh, there is a majority of students here that won't be able to cope with making games as they are extremely difficult to make, require very good maths skills and nothing short of excellent C++ skills.

    I feel that games companies often prefer CS graduates because they have a more robust understanding of algorithm design and the "maths behind programming". If you can demonstrate this then I don't think you have anything to worry about. A solid portfolio of your work will do well to swing the vote in your favour when it comes to getting a job in the industry.

    As far as a "path to nowhere" goes, I'm sure that's going to be the case for 90% of the people on the course, as harsh as it sounds. Either way I plan on doing a masters in CS when I graduate, partially because my background as a programmer stems from security, not games and I'd like to keep my options open. A games programming job would certainly be my pick, given the option, though!

    Hope that helps

    Hey again Nines.

    Could you check out this 2 year program. Its the first two years at a community collage after which you may transfer to a university. I was thinking if going for it.

    Here is the link to the course:
    http://admissions.tamu.edu/forms/deg...ngineering.pdf

    Its a .pdf - you'll need Adobe Reader to view it.


    I have 2 questions for you.
    1. Again, whats the standard of maths involved?
    2. There are two different 2-year courses. Freshman and Sophomore. I have no idea what those are and which one will i be admitted to? Could you tell me what they mean?
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    bump, anyone else?
 
 
 
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