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Would you be doing your degree at your chosen uni at £10k a year? Watch

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    Yeah.
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    Yes. It's not like I'll pay everything back anyway.
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    Possibly, but I would have aimed for a 'higher ranked' uni and done more research into where I could go.

    (not saying I don't like my uni, but I chose it on a whim, which I would not advise doing).
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      Absolutely definitely, without a second thought.
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      To be entirely honest, I don't know if I would. I value university education and my parents wouldn't be happy (read: they'd kill me) if I didn't go but I'd probably have aimed for 'top' universities if I had to pay that much to make sure my degree was 'worth' the money.

      Even then, I don't know if I'd do an English degree. Deep down I know I would, but at the back of my mind I'd always be thinking 'can't I just get a job and read loads of critical essays on the side?'
      I probably wouldn't do creative writing with those increased fees. Unless it was at UEA. Maybe not even then... I could just go to workshops and write in my free time.

      I don't know. :dontknow: If I had to pay that much money, I probably would have thought a lot more about Law. :sigh:
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      (Original post by James4d)
      Possibly, but I would have aimed for a 'higher ranked' uni and done more research into where I could go.

      (not saying I don't like my uni, but I chose it on a whim, which I would not advise doing).
      First off, I would probably would pay £10,000 a year for my course... I think a degree is extremely valuable and well worth the cost. Particularly because the loan is still not like any other loan, you pay it back whilst you're earning over a specific amount. It is, like another member said, a personalised tax. You're not going to get your home reposessed for not having enough money to pay.

      I think what will really benefit people in general is that universities are going to have to specialise A LOT. They will have to market their universities so that they survive and flourish in the market (not that we're talking about privatisation here). People will actually have to make an educated decision as to why they want to go to a specific university, instead of choosing on a whim (which a lot of people do these days).

      Universities will have to make themselves better and offer more to attract students in order to survive.
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      (Original post by barrze)
      Nope. My course is not worth more than they currently charge.
      Exactly this
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      No way (I'm going to uni in 2011). I'm interested/good at History and know where I want to go with it, but £10,000 a year?! Pssst. Hell no.

      I would probably go straight into a Law degree rather than do the GDL/CPE/BPTC etc or worked super hard to become a Dentist . (Otherwise I'd start my own business - which I'm actually seriously thinking of doing but hmmm..)
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      (Original post by Welsh_insomniac)
      First off, I would probably would pay £10,000 a year for my course... I think a degree is extremely valuable and well worth the cost. Particularly because the loan is still not like any other loan, you pay it back whilst you're earning over a specific amount. It is, like another member said, a personalised tax. You're not going to get your home reposessed for not having enough money to pay.

      I think what will really benefit people in general is that universities are going to have to specialise A LOT. They will have to market their universities so that they survive and flourish in the market (not that we're talking about privatisation here). People will actually have to make an educated decision as to why they want to go to a specific university, instead of choosing on a whim (which a lot of people do these days).

      Universities will have to make themselves better and offer more to attract students in order to survive.
      True. WIth 6k+ fees I cant imagine the 'worse' universities surviving that well- unless they really specialise.

      What I'm also interested to see is the range of prices. I can imagine a lot of universities keeping the costs low to attract students, which ofc will affect the university's funding.
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      I would still go, you don't have to pay back your loans until you're earning over a certain amount so I would treat it like an extra tax for 30 years. At the moment I'm paying around £4 per hour of contact time which I think is a very good deal as I get access to expensive lab equipment as well as the lectures.
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      9K an amount most uni's will not even charge anyway
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      100%...hell, I'd do it for 20K a year...
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      No way would I pay 10K per year! Most of the degrees aren't worth the paper they're written on these days -which yes is due to saturation in the market however increasing the fees will be like going back in time when education was only available to those who could afford it. A degree is 3 years on average, so £30,000.00 debt just for the fees then the cost of books and living expenses on top of that makes it ridiculous. Most people struggle even when degrees have been 'cheap'! I know i did...and I had a job working 30 hours a week too! Yes you pay back your student loan when you earn a bit-which incidently is over about £16,000.00 (not that much) and if you factor in having a mortgage and bills and then possibly having children sometime in the future you will have a massive debt hanging over you with no guarantee of a decent well paid job!
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      Yes
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      i would have to have a definite idea of where i wanted my degree course to take me, career wise to know its worthwile
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      Obviously. How will you get a proper (i.e. graduate) job without a degree?
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      (Original post by spex)
      To be honest, the student loan shouldn't even be considered a debt. In the sense you can't lose your home or be forced to claim bankruptcy if you can't pay it back. It's effectively the same as a tax in all but name
      It will be a debt, at an interest rate of 3% plus inflation.
      Owing 45,000 pounds at the end of a three year course affects whether you can get another loan or a mortgage.
      21000 pay in three years' time won't be that much.
      Suppose someone earns just over the 21000 for the rest of their life.
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      (Original post by Doubledog)
      It will be a debt, at an interest rate of 3% plus inflation.
      Owing 45,000 pounds at the end of a three year course affects whether you can get another loan or a mortgage.
      21000 pay in three years' time won't be that much.
      Suppose someone earns just over the 21000 for the rest of their life.
      Yet another person demonstrating how little the public know about the system.

      Firstly the student loan doesn't in any way affect your ability to get credit, that's a myth.
      Interest rates are linked to inflation which means you're paying exactly the same in real terms - this is the cheapest loan you're ever going to get and it doesn't increase in value the longer you leave it.
      If you for example earn 22000 the rest of your life you'll be paying 9% on the amount you have OVER 21000, which is 9% of 1000 each year. You'll never pay off your loan at that rate, but you're only paying £90 a year. Since it's written off after 30 years you're getting it for £2700 which i'm sure you'll agree is not much compared to the value of your degree.
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      (Original post by spex)
      Yet another person demonstrating how little the public know about the system.

      Firstly the student loan doesn't in any way affect your ability to get credit, that's a myth.
      Interest rates are linked to inflation which means you're paying exactly the same in real terms - this is the cheapest loan you're ever going to get and it doesn't increase in value the longer you leave it.
      If you for example earn 22000 the rest of your life you'll be paying 9% on the amount you have OVER 21000, which is 9% of 1000 each year. You'll never pay off your loan at that rate, but you're only paying £90 a year. Since it's written off after 30 years you're getting it for £2700 which i'm sure you'll agree is not much compared to the value of your degree.
      So are you saying that if someone has a student debt of over 50K and is making repayments, that won't affect his ability to repay a mortgage, and are you saying that a mortgage company won't take his outgoings into account?
      You won't be paying exactly the same in real terms because most people will have to pay an amount of interest over and above the inflation linked element of the loan-up to 3% extra, as I said.
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      Of course, Education is invaluable, not only in terms of getting a good job, but also in terms of making someone a better person, as well as the fact that I find chemistry interesting.
     
     
     
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