Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Getting a V-shaped back Watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by a_t)
    Since it cared about having enough energy to get you through workouts, and having enough fuel to build new muscle, its a rough estimate which would provide that, half your intake should be carbs if you wanna bulk and are doing serious lifting, and your fats shouldn't go above about 20% in any case otherwise you're eating the wrong ****
    so why does it care about a percentage?? its the amount that matters, which is different based on each person LBM and height etc.
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Onge)
    you can get them anywhere, argos sells them cheap. i bought mine for £20. You dont even need the instructions. Just bolt it into the door when you get it, youl know how to doit once you get it. It took me less than 10 mins to fit.
    Google doorway pullup bar. Do pullups from a dead hang/stretch. Squeeze at the top. Learn to pull with the lats instead of the broceps. Profit.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    Not sure if you've heard of Dorian Yates
    Spoiler:
    Show
    but he was Mr. Olympia, here is his recent video on a back workout http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/dorian-yates-blood-guts-2.htm
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by sergioib)
    Hello everyone!

    I have been wondering how to get a V-shaped back and I would like to know what kind of excercise I could do in order to make it more prominent.

    Thanks very much!
    Wear a corset.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by int92)
    so why does it care about a percentage?? its the amount that matters, which is different based on each person LBM and height etc.
    I already answered that you ****ing moron, you want me to type out the same thing again? Its a rough guide you ****wit
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by a_t)
    I already answered that you ****ing moron, you want me to type out the same thing again? Its a rough guide you ****wit
    yea so rough its pointless, if ur gonna go thro the trouble of counting that then u might as well do it right.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by int92)
    yea so rough its pointless, if ur gonna go thro the trouble of counting that then u might as well do it right.
    That is doing it right, its the split the England rugby team use for their nutrition, I suppose they don't know what they're doing either do they?

    Look at this http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/topicoftheweek25.htm Advocating a 50/30/20 split

    You'll find countless articles online advocating the same approach, I don't know why you're being so pigheaded and stubborn about this breakdown, it works
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by a_t)
    That is doing it right, its the split the England rugby team use for their nutrition, I suppose they don't know what they're doing either do they?

    Look at this http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/topicoftheweek25.htm Advocating a 50/30/20 split

    You'll find countless articles online advocating the same approach, I don't know why you're being so pigheaded and stubborn about this breakdown, it works
    just cos ppl do it doesnt mean its the best way. think of all the people who waste their time trying to 'tone'.

    'Macronutrient Needs
    Once you work out how many CALORIES you need to reach your goals you need to work out how much of each particular macronutrient you should aim for. And this is one of the areas that is MOST confused in the calculation of requirements!! So... Let us go through it and try to make it as simple as possible! This should NOT be based on a generic RATIO of total calorie intake such as '30:40:30 or 40:40:20. Your body doesn't CARE what % intake you have for macronutrients. It works in terms of SUFFICIENT QUANTITY per LEAN MASS or TOTAL MASS. Therefore your level should relate back to your BODY and your needs!!

    1. Protein: Most studies out suggest that in the face of ADEQUATE calories and CARBS then the following protein intakes are sufficient:
    STRENGTH training -> 1.2 to 1.6g per KG bodyweight (about .6 / pound)
    ENDURANCE training -> 1.4 to 1.8g per KG bodyweight (about .8 / pound)
    ADOLESCENT in training -> 1.8 to 2.2g per KG bodyweight (about 1g / pound)
    BUT they also acknowledge that protein becomes MORE important in the context of LOWER calorie intakes, or LOWER carb intakes.

    Anyway - you can see that the general recommendations given in the 'bodybuilding' area (1g / pound) is nearly double this! And although the evidence out to suggest a NEED for this requirement is scarce - some general 'bodybuilding' guidelines would be based as follows:
    If bodyfat UNKNOWN but AVERAGE = 1-1.25g per pound weight
    If bodyfat KNOWN = 1.25-1.5g per LEAN weight

    If you are VERY LEAN or if you are on a LOW TOTAL CALORIE INTAKE then protein becomes more important - so stick toward the higher levels:
    Average bodyfat, lower calorie intake = 1.25-1.5 x pound total mass
    Bodyfat known, lower calorie intake = 1.33-2 x pounds lean mass

    If you are VERY OVERWEIGHT, VERY INACTIVE, and NOT on a lower calorie diet then you should stick closer to, or decrease slightly BELOW the above levels:
    protein = something around the 1 x total weight (down to 1 x LEAN MASS).


    2. Fats: Generally speaking, although the body can get away with short periods of very low fat, in the long run your body NEEDS fat to maintain general health, satiety, and sanity. Additionally - any form of high intensity training will benefit from a 'fat buffer' in your diet - which acts to control free radical damage and inflammation.

    General guides:
    Average or lean: 1 - 2g fat/ kg body weight [between 0.45 - 1g total weight/ pounds]
    High bodyfat: 1-2g fat/ LEAN weight [between 0.45 - 1g LEAN weight/ pounds]
    IF low calorie dieting - you can decrease further, but as a minimum, I would not suggest LESS than about 0.35g/ pound.
    Note 1: Total fat intake is NOT the same as 'essential fats' (essential fats are specific TYPES of fats that are INCLUDED in your total fat intake)...

    3. Carbs: VERY important for athletes, HIGHLY ACTIVE individuals, or those trying to GAIN MASS - Carbs help with workout intensity, health, and satiety (and sanity). But there are no specific 'requirements' for your body. Carbs are basically used by most as 'the extra stuff'.
    If you are an athlete - I would actually suggest you CALCULATE a requirement for these:
    moderately active: 4.5 - 6.5 g/ kg (about 2 - 3g/ pound)
    highly active: 6.5 - 9 g/ kg (about 3 - 4g/ pound)

    But for 'general folk' to calculate your carbs you just calculate it from the calories left over from fats/ protein:
    carb calories = Total calorie needs - ([protein grams as above x 4] + [fat grams as above x 9])]
    carbs in grams = above total/ 4'

    if u can be bothered
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by vBison)
    so you basically want a stick thin waist, and massive bat-wings?

    skinny tummy:
    well firstly make a low-fat diet plan, do 3 reps of 20 sit-ups a week, increase the reppege per week by 1.
    then you wanna do bicycle sit-ups, 3 by 20 a week for trimming your sides. increae reppege per week by 1.

    Massive back wings:
    Cheap option: do a lot of swimming (front crawl - butterfly)
    Small Money option: purchase 10 to 20kg dumbells and do dumbell rows. 2 x 20 per week for 2 weeks. after every 2 weeks increase the reppege. low weights, do the rows fast for cutting and building pink muscle (quick twitch). do heavy weights slow for red muscle (bulking).
    Big Money option: go to a gym, and ask a personal trainer best back workouts.

    Or.... do boxing. But when i say "increase reps", do it within reason lol. the point of reps is to not increase it to 100 a week, but finding a comfortable set of repetitions which challenge you, yet still efficiently work out your muscles. too many on too heavy weights will not do.

    oh yeah and buy a good creatin based muscle protein shake/ supplements.
    terrible post
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by a_t)
    That is doing it right, its the split the England rugby team use for their nutrition, I suppose they don't know what they're doing either do they?

    Look at this http://www.bodybuilding.com/fun/topicoftheweek25.htm Advocating a 50/30/20 split

    You'll find countless articles online advocating the same approach, I don't know why you're being so pigheaded and stubborn about this breakdown, it works
    yea, no response but a neg. 'tard
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by int92)
    yea, no response but a neg. 'tard
    I didn't neg you
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by a_t)
    I didn't neg you
    well whoever did :facepalm:

    anyway. see what i meant? (that long post)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by int92)
    well whoever did :facepalm:

    anyway. see what i meant? (that long post)
    I'll give it a full reply when I have time to give it some thought
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    to get that v-shape you essentially need 1 exercise for this, but i've included 2 others as to do the first exercise, if done wrong, can result in serious injury

    1.deadlift
    2. pull ups with chain/added weight
    3. dumb bell pull overs

    thats all you need, go to youtube and watch videos on how to do them ( at a gym of course)
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by int92)
    just cos ppl do it doesnt mean its the best way. think of all the people who waste their time trying to 'tone'.

    yeah but I wasn't talking about stupid women lol, most of my nutritional info I get from that England Rugby Team 28 day nutritional plan that's in the stickes, its really good

    'Macronutrient Needs
    Once you work out how many CALORIES you need to reach your goals you need to work out how much of each particular macronutrient you should aim for. And this is one of the areas that is MOST confused in the calculation of requirements!! So... Let us go through it and try to make it as simple as possible! This should NOT be based on a generic RATIO of total calorie intake such as '30:40:30 or 40:40:20. Your body doesn't CARE what % intake you have for macronutrients. It works in terms of SUFFICIENT QUANTITY per LEAN MASS or TOTAL MASS. Therefore your level should relate back to your BODY and your needs!!

    yeah, ok, but the split can help

    1. Protein: Most studies out suggest that in the face of ADEQUATE calories and CARBS then the following protein intakes are sufficient:
    STRENGTH training -> 1.2 to 1.6g per KG bodyweight (about .6 / pound)
    ENDURANCE training -> 1.4 to 1.8g per KG bodyweight (about .8 / pound)
    ADOLESCENT in training -> 1.8 to 2.2g per KG bodyweight (about 1g / pound)
    BUT they also acknowledge that protein becomes MORE important in the context of LOWER calorie intakes, or LOWER carb intakes.

    Anyway - you can see that the general recommendations given in the 'bodybuilding' area (1g / pound) is nearly double this! And although the evidence out to suggest a NEED for this requirement is scarce - some general 'bodybuilding' guidelines would be based as follows:
    If bodyfat UNKNOWN but AVERAGE = 1-1.25g per pound weight
    If bodyfat KNOWN = 1.25-1.5g per LEAN weight

    If you are VERY LEAN or if you are on a LOW TOTAL CALORIE INTAKE then protein becomes more important - so stick toward the higher levels:
    Average bodyfat, lower calorie intake = 1.25-1.5 x pound total mass
    Bodyfat known, lower calorie intake = 1.33-2 x pounds lean mass

    If you are VERY OVERWEIGHT, VERY INACTIVE, and NOT on a lower calorie diet then you should stick closer to, or decrease slightly BELOW the above levels:
    protein = something around the 1 x total weight (down to 1 x LEAN MASS).

    everyone on TSR seems to eat 500 grams a day lol, but yeah generally agreed

    2. Fats: Generally speaking, although the body can get away with short periods of very low fat, in the long run your body NEEDS fat to maintain general health, satiety, and sanity. Additionally - any form of high intensity training will benefit from a 'fat buffer' in your diet - which acts to control free radical damage and inflammation.

    General guides:
    Average or lean: 1 - 2g fat/ kg body weight [between 0.45 - 1g total weight/ pounds]
    High bodyfat: 1-2g fat/ LEAN weight [between 0.45 - 1g LEAN weight/ pounds]
    IF low calorie dieting - you can decrease further, but as a minimum, I would not suggest LESS than about 0.35g/ pound.
    Note 1: Total fat intake is NOT the same as 'essential fats' (essential fats are specific TYPES of fats that are INCLUDED in your total fat intake)...

    only thing I'd add to this is that you get fats from good sources e.g. avocados and fish and olive oil

    3. Carbs: VERY important for athletes, HIGHLY ACTIVE individuals, or those trying to GAIN MASS - Carbs help with workout intensity, health, and satiety (and sanity). But there are no specific 'requirements' for your body. Carbs are basically used by most as 'the extra stuff'.
    If you are an athlete - I would actually suggest you CALCULATE a requirement for these:
    moderately active: 4.5 - 6.5 g/ kg (about 2 - 3g/ pound)
    highly active: 6.5 - 9 g/ kg (about 3 - 4g/ pound)

    But for 'general folk' to calculate your carbs you just calculate it from the calories left over from fats/ protein:
    carb calories = Total calorie needs - ([protein grams as above x 4] + [fat grams as above x 9])]
    carbs in grams = above total/ 4'

    k

    if u can be bothered
    tbh we end up at a similar solution, yours is just more complex, I dunno what the big deal is
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by a_t)
    tbh we end up at a similar solution, yours is just more complex, I dunno what the big deal is
    well no cos ur way takes more effort getting the ratios right and isnt even as effective cos its not suited for u.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: December 8, 2010
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.