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Universities raise grade requirements AFTER prospectuses issued Watch

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    (Original post by jb9191)
    Just print screen it where it says they have got the requirements you need on the website. Then if they change it and you are not accepted, they are legally bound to let you in as that was what was shown when you applied.

    The same principles for shops - if they have a label of £20 on something that is £100 and you take it to the till they have a legal obligation to sell it at its cut price as that was what was advertised.

    Its part of the Misleading Marketing Regulations. Don't forget you pay to apply through UCAS so therefore you should be reimbursed at a minimum and be able to contact UCAS to choose another option as you have been misled.

    Its not your fault. Surely they should have updated their sites earlier or their prospectuses before they sent them out.
    Not true. In fact I don't think anything in your post is true.

    EDIT: In fact, there are so many things wrong with this post I don't know where to begin.
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    (Original post by Lell)
    Not true. In fact I don't think anything in your post is true.

    EDIT: In fact, there are so many things wrong with this post I don't know where to begin.
    Tell that to Trading Standards.

    No, they don't have to honour it, although (a) it is a criminal offense if the advertised price was purposely misleading (OFT link below) and (b) they would need to pull or change the advertisement. A self-regulated watchdog group (ASA) can take action in such cases, but there doesn't appear to be any cases whereby the advertiser was forced to honour a posted price.

    The watchdog organization for misleading advertising is the UK Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). The ASA is recognised by the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) as the established means for regulating misleading and comparative ads in non-broadcast media in the UK.

    I've got loads of things at cut value. Most noticeably I ordered 15 crates of lager from Asda as they were wrongly advertised on the internet at £2.18 a crate so I ordered a lot of them. Asda then removed it as soon as they became aware but because I already ordered them, they had to honour the sale. If they then changed the advertisement and I went to the store and said they were on the internet for £2.18 and they said it was an error and its been changed then I wouldnt have a leg to stand on as the issue was rectified.

    Asda may have just honoured it out of good will in order for me not be annoyed but I've also done it at Bank Clothes Store and JD Sports.

    There may be an exception to this rule but it’s covered by criminal legislation - The Control of Misleading Advertisements Regulations. This means that although you can’t insist on a shop selling you something at an advertised price, if they have specifically advertised an item at one price but charge another price for it, and if they continue to do so after you have pointed out their error, they are committing an offence. If you suspect that a shop is deliberately trying to mislead customers, you should notify your local Trading Standards team.

    Basically if I take the crates of lager to the till and they scan them through and try to charge me the extra price, they have committed the offence. They should make me aware before scanning. I've had so many stuff at cut price its unbelievable.
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    (Original post by jb9191)
    Tell that to Trading Standards.

    No, they don't have to honour it, although (a) it is a criminal offense if the advertised price was purposely misleading (OFT link below) and (b) they would need to pull or change the advertisement. A self-regulated watchdog group (ASA) can take action in such cases, but there doesn't appear to be any cases whereby the advertiser was forced to honour a posted price.

    The watchdog organization for misleading advertising is the UK Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). The ASA is recognised by the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) as the established means for regulating misleading and comparative ads in non-broadcast media in the UK.

    I've got loads of things at cut value. Most noticeably I ordered 15 crates of lager from Asda as they were wrongly advertised on the internet at £2.18 a crate so I ordered a lot of them. Asda then removed it as soon as they became aware but because I already ordered them, they had to honour the sale. If they then changed the advertisement and I went to the store and said they were on the internet for £2.18 and they said it was an error and its been changed then I wouldnt have a leg to stand on as the issue was rectified.

    Asda may have just honoured it out of good will in order for me not be annoyed but I've also done it at Bank Clothes Store and JD Sports.

    There may be an exception to this rule but it’s covered by criminal legislation - The Control of Misleading Advertisements Regulations. This means that although you can’t insist on a shop selling you something at an advertised price, if they have specifically advertised an item at one price but charge another price for it, and if they continue to do so after you have pointed out their error, they are committing an offence. If you suspect that a shop is deliberately trying to mislead customers, you should notify your local Trading Standards team.

    Basically if I take the crates of lager to the till and they scan them through and try to charge me the extra price, they have committed the offence. They should make me aware before scanning. I've had so many stuff at cut price its unbelievable.
    Well that was a bit tl;dr but I'm going to address your original post now because I am THAT bored.
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    (Original post by jb9191)
    Just print screen it where it says they have got the requirements you need on the website. Then if they change it and you are not accepted, they are legally bound to let you in as that was what was shown when you applied.

    The same principles for shops - if they have a label of £20 on something that is £100 and you take it to the till they have a legal obligation to sell it at its cut price as that was what was advertised.

    Its part of the Misleading Marketing Regulations. Don't forget you pay to apply through UCAS so therefore you should be reimbursed at a minimum and be able to contact UCAS to choose another option as you have been misled.

    Its not your fault. Surely they should have updated their sites earlier or their prospectuses before they sent them out.
    1. Universities are not 'legally bound' to accept anyone for admission. They can reject you if they want. Otherwise Oxbridge would be embroiled in constant lawsuits from all the A* students they reject...

    2. Shops do not have a 'legal obligation' to sell something at the advertised price. I introduce you to the legal concept of invitation to treat, look at the cases of Fisher v Bell and Boots Cash Chemists.

    3. The Misleading Marketing Regulations, based on my quick read on Westlaw, details three offences: advertising which misleads traders and comparative advertising which is misleading or promoting either of these two offences. Clearly university entry requirements/ wrongly tagged goods don't come under these. Furthermore, this law seems to relate to products; it is debatable whether a university course is a 'product'.
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    (Original post by jb9191)
    Tell that to Trading Standards.

    No, they don't have to honour it, although (a) it is a criminal offense if the advertised price was purposely misleading (OFT link below) and (b) they would need to pull or change the advertisement. A self-regulated watchdog group (ASA) can take action in such cases, but there doesn't appear to be any cases whereby the advertiser was forced to honour a posted price.

    The watchdog organization for misleading advertising is the UK Advertising Standards Authority (ASA). The ASA is recognised by the Office of Fair Trading (OFT) as the established means for regulating misleading and comparative ads in non-broadcast media in the UK.

    I've got loads of things at cut value. Most noticeably I ordered 15 crates of lager from Asda as they were wrongly advertised on the internet at £2.18 a crate so I ordered a lot of them. Asda then removed it as soon as they became aware but because I already ordered them, they had to honour the sale. If they then changed the advertisement and I went to the store and said they were on the internet for £2.18 and they said it was an error and its been changed then I wouldnt have a leg to stand on as the issue was rectified.

    Asda may have just honoured it out of good will in order for me not be annoyed but I've also done it at Bank Clothes Store and JD Sports.

    There may be an exception to this rule but it’s covered by criminal legislation - The Control of Misleading Advertisements Regulations. This means that although you can’t insist on a shop selling you something at an advertised price, if they have specifically advertised an item at one price but charge another price for it, and if they continue to do so after you have pointed out their error, they are committing an offence. If you suspect that a shop is deliberately trying to mislead customers, you should notify your local Trading Standards team.

    Basically if I take the crates of lager to the till and they scan them through and try to charge me the extra price, they have committed the offence. They should make me aware before scanning. I've had so many stuff at cut price its unbelievable.
    Now to address this post. As above, it is not a criminal offenCe. Otherwise pretty much every shop would be up before the courts on a daily basis for this.

    You are also missing a key point that these entry requirements are not 'advertising'...they are ENTRY REQUIREMENTS.

    Asda either honoured your sale by way of goodwill or were legally bound as you had already paid for the crates (as opposed to just putting them in your basket-at which point no one is legally bound to do anything).

    I just looked for these 'control of misleading ads regulations', can't find them. Care to direct me?
    My god you have got the law so wrong it is shocking.
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    (Original post by Lell)
    1. Universities are not 'legally bound' to accept anyone for admission. They can reject you if they want. Otherwise Oxbridge would be embroiled in constant lawsuits from all the A* students they reject...

    2. Shops do not have a 'legal obligation' to sell something at the advertised price. I introduce you to the legal concept of invitation to treat, look at the cases of Fisher v Bell and Boots Cash Chemists.

    3. The Misleading Marketing Regulations, based on my quick read on Westlaw, details three offences: advertising which misleads traders and comparative advertising which is misleading or promoting either of these two offences. Clearly university entry requirements/ wrongly tagged goods don't come under these. Furthermore, this law seems to relate to products; it is debatable whether a university course is a 'product'.
    well I've got loads of things cut price and I know people who switch tags to get discounts.

    I guess its strictly down to luck. I'm not arguing with me but in my personal experience 9/10 the shop honours the price anyway so you keep going there in the future which will offset the loss from the error anyway.
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    (Original post by Lell)
    Now to address this post. As above, it is not a criminal offenCe. Otherwise pretty much every shop would be up before the courts on a daily basis for this.

    You are also missing a key point that these entry requirements are not 'advertising'...they are ENTRY REQUIREMENTS.

    Asda either honoured your sale by way of goodwill or were legally bound as you had already paid for the crates (as opposed to just putting them in your basket-at which point no one is legally bound to do anything).

    My god you have got the law so wrong it is shocking.
    Why you crying for?

    I know the law.
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    (Original post by jb9191)
    Why you crying for?

    I know the law.
    I'm not 'crying', I'm setting your misguided ideas straight. You very clearly don't know the law....

    *fellow law students please back me up*
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    (Original post by jb9191)
    well I've got loads of things cut price and I know people who switch tags to get discounts.

    I guess its strictly down to luck. I'm not arguing with me but in my personal experience 9/10 the shop honours the price anyway so you keep going there in the future which will offset the loss from the error anyway.

    Anecdote=law in your mind clearly :rolleyes:

    The shop may honour the price but it doesn't mean they are legally bound to...
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    This is standard practice and happens every year.

    The fact people are arguing over whether its lawful or not is pretty stupid. Its lawful.
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    (Original post by Lell)
    Anecdote=law in your mind clearly :rolleyes:

    The shop may honour the price but it doesn't mean they are legally bound to...
    I do know the law.

    I was just messing about so you dont need to cry.

    However, in terms of university, if someone has already paid through UCAS shouldn't they be able to choose another option through UCAS because basically one has been wasted due to the university changing the requirements ?
 
 
 
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