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calves sieze up! Watch

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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    I have multiple times, feel free to enlighten me.

    http://www.runnerplus.com/.../43-ove...ith_an_injury/


    This was the first link but I haven't checked it cause my computer is being gay, and redirecting me to gay porn sites incidentally. However I will find you a very good page explaining it if the above link fails.
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    (Original post by Lamps08)
    Thanks for your reply. This is what one of the letters from a neurologist said:

    Neurologically there are no abnormalities of power, reflexes or sensation, and he can hop quite normally of his right foot. There are no lumbar sacral vertebral abnormalities. His right calf is obviously thinner than his left, although it is of normal contour and therefore not necessarily pathologically wasted.

    Just to make sure that the right calf thinning is constitutional, rather than representing any neuromuscular lesion, I am arranging electromyography. However I have fully reassured Mr. X that I fully expect this will be normal. Otherwise I have reassured him that I find no evidence of a neurological lesion.


    I never went to the elctromyography
    That would seem to disprove what I suspect might be going on, but not fully as an electromyography would show up weakness in signal to your muscle in far greater detail than a simple reflex/sensation test. Interesting. Not really any more I can add over the internet other than to maybe go get it checked out again. Could save you a lifetime of injury. They might refer you straight into electromyography. In the meantime I would probably suggest some sort of medial arch support. You can get generic ones from places like boots, and if you get a pretty big wedge, you might find this clears you up as it will do the job that your (potentially) weakened peroneus longus should be doing.
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    (Original post by Ironmike)
    That would seem to disprove what I suspect might be going on, but not fully as an electromyography would show up weakness in signal to your muscle in far greater detail than a simple reflex/sensation test. Interesting. Not really any more I can add over the internet other than to maybe go get it checked out again. Could save you a lifetime of injury. They might refer you straight into electromyography. In the meantime I would probably suggest some sort of medial arch support. You can get generic ones from places like boots, and if you get a pretty big wedge, you might find this clears you up as it will do the job that your (potentially) weakened peroneus longus should be doing.
    Yeh I have another appointment coming up actually- I'm quite persistent I guess.

    I think you could be onto something too. I have recently started wearing a new pair of shoes with little arch support, but still with an orthotic and have noticed how bad it is making my foot roll in. Without an orthotic insole there is NO way I could even walk. My foot is a bloody state. I'm definately going to try and strengthen any weakened muscles and get the electromyography done as I would be stupid not to this time. Thanks for the help.


    edit: But even if i did address any neuromuscular issue I would still be left with a screwed foot. I personally still believe it was caused by tight calf muscles. The first metatarsal has gone upwards and I can't really explain the rest but basically I just put all the pressure on my little toe and outside of foot when my foot is in neutral. Me thinks I should give up on this one.
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    (Original post by Lamps08)
    http://www.runnerplus.com/.../43-ove...ith_an_injury/


    This was the first link but I haven't checked it cause my computer is being gay, and redirecting me to gay porn sites incidentally. However I will find you a very good page explaining it if the above link fails.
    It still isn't one of the main causes, and it's important to point out though that your history and case presentation does not match.
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    (Original post by *Stargirl*)
    i strecth for 30 mins before running, using a book of stretches and theres about 25 i do. when my calves are relaxed i can run 10km easy in 1hr. im aiming to do a 20k mini marathon. when my calves sieze up i cant even make 10mins due to it being so uncomfortable. the tightness is mostly in the calf muscles just above the ankle and the lower half of the calf..within a few minutes of running it all becomes very tough and tight there and for example, circling my ankle in the air becomes difficult. i have new-this-year running shoes hat ive used for a few months - aesics nimbus 12 which are great for me as i have a high arch.
    Firstly, you don't need to stretch for 30 whole minutes prior to exercise. Seconldy, Static Stretching does have it's place and is very useful but IMO not before exercise.

    - Before you do anything, get a tennis ball and roll on it. Bottom and ball of your foot is first while in a standing postion for about a minute each. Side and back of your lower leg. and then Perhaps your external hip rotators aswell (google the stretch, ball the ball under your hip, find a sore spot and roll over it for a bit).

    - Focus on a dyanmic warm up. Which has already been talked about in this thread, if you want more info just ask. You can never go wrong with integrating a good dynamic warm-up program prior to exercise, as this option challenges both range-of-motion and stability to provide a comprehensive training effect in a matter of minutes.

    Why the bottom of the foot first? Well beginning at the bottom of the foot, the plantar surface is often the source of trouble that communicates up through the rest of the line. This line is referred to as the Superficial Back Line. By manipulating the fascia at the bottom of the feet, you change the status of the fascia all around the body and in a sense, there's a "systemic release" and everything lets go.

    It could really and quite easily be a number of causes for you having tight calfs, your running bio mechanics might be out of place, your hamstrings are tight, bad knees, posture, tight hips or hips out of place with pelvic tilt etc. If it’s stiff, in order to get it to relax, you likely need to train an adjacent tissue that acts as a synergist. Basically, just because you have tight calfs doesn't mean to say it's down to that specific muscle, the body is in alignment.

    (Original post by Lamps08)
    My guess is that because my calves were so tight, my foot had to compensate by over-pronating, and thus now have really small calves because my foot and calf doesn't work efficiently. All I know is that I seriously screwed up my rehab....because I didn't do one haha. All rehab guides for sprained ankles include calf stretching, not strengthening, so my guess is that its tight calves not weak calves that have buggered me.
    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    Your calves and your arches are two very distinctly different and detached structures - as I've said already it's extremely unlikely that tight calves are the cause of your overpronation (in fact I can't find it documented anywhere). It is far more likely that the muscles in your arches have atrophied in response to lack of exercise (like your calves and most of the musculature in your lower body) or that you had this underlying problem previously and you were simply unaware of it.
    I've missed most of this dicussion but I'll add.

    ''Tight calves can cause over pronation. The dorsi-flexion (moving the ankle upwards) is not available from the ankle joint due to the tight calves, so it has to come from the sub talar joint. It comes as part of the pronation mechanism though and so increases the amount of pronation as well.''

    However, with your individual case this does not make it conclusive. Is it correct that your calves and your arches are two very distinctly different and detached structures and as mentioned above to the OP, your problem could lie in a number of places.

    Over pronation occurs due to a biomechanical dysfunction (walking abnormality) and treatment of this is focused on corrective footwear and orthotics.

    Chances are your posture is poor. Lets say you have rounded shoulders and a anterior pelvic tilt. Activation of your glutes are poor and with result your hamstrings and lumbar erectors are stressed. Giving you tight calves. Thus, a biomechanical dysfunction. Working, activating and strenghering your glutes to take the stress off the lumbar erectors and/or hamstrings and adductor magnus corrects this. The point is that you don’t necessarily have to stretch a muscle to reduce its stiffness.
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    (Original post by Different Cloud)
    Firstly, you don't need to stretch for 30 whole minutes prior to exercise. Seconldy, Static Stretching does have it's place and is very useful but IMO not before exercise.

    - Before you do anything, get a tennis ball and roll on it. Bottom and ball of your foot is first while in a standing postion for about a minute each. Side and back of your lower leg. and then Perhaps your external hip rotators aswell (google the stretch, ball the ball under your hip, find a sore spot and roll over it for a bit).

    - Focus on a dyanmic warm up. Which has already been talked about in this thread, if you want more info just ask. You can never go wrong with integrating a good dynamic warm-up program prior to exercise, as this option challenges both range-of-motion and stability to provide a comprehensive training effect in a matter of minutes.

    Why the bottom of the foot first? Well beginning at the bottom of the foot, the plantar surface is often the source of trouble that communicates up through the rest of the line. This line is referred to as the Superficial Back Line. By manipulating the fascia at the bottom of the feet, you change the status of the fascia all around the body and in a sense, there's a "systemic release" and everything lets go.

    It could really and quite easily be a number of causes for you having tight calfs, your running bio mechanics might be out of place, your hamstrings are tight, bad knees, posture, tight hips or hips out of place with pelvic tilt etc. If it’s stiff, in order to get it to relax, you likely need to train an adjacent tissue that acts as a synergist. Basically, just because you have tight calfs doesn't mean to say it's down to that specific muscle, the body is in alignment.





    I've missed most of this dicussion but I'll add.

    ''Tight calves can cause over pronation. The dorsi-flexion (moving the ankle upwards) is not available from the ankle joint due to the tight calves, so it has to come from the sub talar joint. It comes as part of the pronation mechanism though and so increases the amount of pronation as well.''

    However, with your individual case this does not make it conclusive. Is it correct that your calves and your arches are two very distinctly different and detached structures and as mentioned above to the OP, your problem could lie in a number of places.

    Over pronation occurs due to a biomechanical dysfunction (walking abnormality) and treatment of this is focused on corrective footwear and orthotics.

    Chances are your posture is poor. Lets say you have rounded shoulders and a anterior pelvic tilt. Activation of your glutes are poor and with result your hamstrings and lumbar erectors are stressed. Giving you tight calves. Thus, a biomechanical dysfunction. Working, activating and strenghering your glutes to take the stress off the lumbar erectors and/or hamstrings and adductor magnus corrects this. The point is that you don’t necessarily have to stretch a muscle to reduce its stiffness.

    edit: So tight calves are probably the reason I have developed over-pronation. The fact that they are 2 different detached structures doesn't mean that a tightness in one can't affect the other directly. You have quite clearly stated that tight calf muscles can directly cause over-pronation of the foot and therefore the two structures are related. The only thing thing my case that could have caused over-pronation is tight calves, or atleast most likely. The fact is that tight calves can indeed cause overpronation which is what others were arguing.

    My posture has always been excellent. People have even commented on it in the past. I have a very strong lower body, and nothing wrong with my shoulders or anything structurally. I am very sure on these aspects. My pelvis has shifted forward or something since the injury though, but this was definately as a result and is only on the affected side.
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    (Original post by ch0c0h01ic)
    I have multiple times, feel free to enlighten me.

    http://www.sherrymclaughlin.com/tag/over-pronation/


    ''The two most common causes of over pronation: Believe it or not, it isn't a lack of an orthotic in your shoe! Before you slip an orthotic in your shoe or invest in motion control running shoes, consider that the two most common causes of over pronation are a weak gluteus medius (hip abductor) and a lack of ankle dorsiflexion (tight calf muscles).''

    I guess you're wrong
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    Thing is, within the medical/sports medicine field, you can always find evidence to back up pretty much anything. I agree with her stating that glute medius would have an effect on over pronation, but I'm still not convinced by tight calves. I don't think that anyone here is particularly wrong, but if you believe it's your calves, then it's up to you to seek advice, analyse the findings and then come to a decision about what is best for you. All I would say is that whoever you end up seeing in the future, try to have an open mind. The hardest patient to help in my experience is the one who turns up and tells you exactly what is wrong with them, exactly what you should be doing, and that you shouldn't waste your time investigating anything else. In respect to yourself, this means that if you are 100% positive that tight calves are you issue, then you aren't going to listen to anything a medical professional says anyway, so maybe just save yourself the bother? Don't mean this in a nasty way, but the problem in the internet age is that everyone is a doctor, and a little bit too much information can be just as dangerous as none at all!
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    (Original post by Lamps08)
    http://www.sherrymclaughlin.com/tag/over-pronation/


    ''The two most common causes of over pronation: Believe it or not, it isn't a lack of an orthotic in your shoe! Before you slip an orthotic in your shoe or invest in motion control running shoes, consider that the two most common causes of over pronation are a weak gluteus medius (hip abductor) and a lack of ankle dorsiflexion (tight calf muscles).''

    I guess you're wrong
    Uh, you're forgetting 'incorrect footwear'.
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    Simples *click*
    You better just man the f**k up gyal.
 
 
 
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