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    (Original post by PKU_Research007)
    W/e Dude I am highly suspect of any "foreigners" chinese that claims to be at a below top 5 university. I am not bitter at all just observant. Even my own colleagues have admitted that they have on more than one occasion been accosted by students that have asked to buy. If you really need tones then you are no way ready for any university. And honestly its a bit bizarre. I don't know how long you've been in China buddy but you are naive and very arrogant. You can ask a chinese friend what does "bai mian" mean (and if you need tones for that there is no way in hell you got and HSK 5). SO lets be frank, you can't get into a british uni so you want to boost up the ego, my RA calls people like you paper baskets and its quite understandable. But then again the British have always been arrogant when it comes to China so it shouldn't be surprising its continued. And Token laowai is quite adequate description of a foreigner with no chu xi that gets an ego boost by saying NI HAO MA decently... but then again its for "personal" reasons. I meet plenty of you paper baskets at PKU that decide to take the exam for entrance to PKU and then complain when they get rejected. Maybe xiamen doesn't check to see if an individual is at a certain level but Im sure SOAS and sheffield will.

    Ooh, someone's angry, eh? Hmm, you don't seem to understand much of my post. When I say put tones, I mean put tones because when you write pinyin like that, you give hardly any indication of what word or character you're trying to express. You should probably get a Chinese person to read your post to see what I mean, because as I indeed mentioned, the Chinese people I asked to read your sentence looked at your pinyin and said what I said. No characters, no tone indications to indicate what pronunciation (and thus word) you're trying to say, so in the end, they can't guess what you're trying to say.

    Anyway, it's Christmas Day mate, and since unlike you I'm in a good mood I'm going to enjoy it, not write rants here in the hope I'll fire back something fiery for your satisfaction. I think you need to chill out for a while, and stop writing childish things about people you don't know a thing about. Oh and it's level 6, by the way.
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    (Original post by grt)
    I do fully see the point in going to HKU - I even like their library and am thinking of doing a PhD there (as if they'd ever accept me ). But... when it comes to mainland China, well, I was considering to do a Masters/PhD there, at some of the universities mentioned above (originally I thought that there's no sense in doing it at a non top 5/7 university).

    What I was told by academics at SOAS and Warwick that all have been to mainland Chinese universities for numerous visits or have taught there for some time was: don't do it (and most had a somewhat irritated expression when saying that). It's not worth it, the academic education even at the best couple of universities is at best average to UK standards and it's basically just a waste of time if I want to stay in academia or want to "show off" my China knowledge after having lived/studied there for 2-4 years to companies/organisations that have a clue about Chinese education. I was rather irritated at first but kind of started to understand them after having talked to a couple of Chinese students I know and that have studied at these kind of universities before. Last but not least, I was told, a degree from globally renowned universities will make it easier for you to find a well-paid job in China, no matter in which sector you wanted to work. <- just hear-say but I do believe them to have a point.
    You make good points, and I've had the same told to me too. But in the end what I feel is that the education quality and what you get out of it greatly depends on your subject. The subjects I mentioned above of course might have plenty of downsides in some universities, but considering them has been the product of several years of research and knowing Chinese students who have talked to me about Xiamen Uni. Things like Chinese law, and economics in certain ways, don't differ in huge ways when it comes to what you learn. You can easily get a really poor education in English Language or History, but Chinese law is, well, law on paper really in some ways, and learning that properly is a lot towards your own responsibility. I'm probably writing my points a bit weirdly, sorry.

    I'm very aware that I would be making a sacrifice in potential education quality and degree worth, but a lot of it comes down to personal reasons. And because I've had reassurance that there are companies and unis in the UK which will value me.

    Anyway, I've not settled on studying in China. I just mentioned it as an option in my first post. I'm applying for both the UK and China.
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    (Original post by EzPz)
    Hey,

    I'm hopefully applying for HKU to study Economics in 2012, the university and country is amazing! Now for UK students (non-jupas) the requirements on the website are around 'EE' surely this cannot be correct?

    I have a few questions I was wondering if anyone can answer;
    I'm an english student studying: Maths, Accounting, Economics and Financial Studies all currently at AS level. It's probably to early to judge predicted grades but I am aiming for AAAA. Next year I pick up Further Maths (AS) and Mandarin.
    My GCSE's were all A's and B's, bringing me onto my main questions.

    What would companies offering scholarships look for in a student?
    Are my potential grades an issue?
    Is there anything I can do to make me stand out from other applicants?

    Thank you so much for reading!

    I am from HK so I think I may help you abit. Since most HKers recognized that UK AL is much easier than HK's one, I strongly encourage u to study IB if u want to study in HK..and..I think u need at least 3 A* for econ.
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    (Original post by mrnightcat)
    You make good points, and I've had the same told to me too. But in the end what I feel is that the education quality and what you get out of it greatly depends on your subject. The subjects I mentioned above of course might have plenty of downsides in some universities, but considering them has been the product of several years of research and knowing Chinese students who have talked to me about Xiamen Uni. Things like Chinese law, and economics in certain ways, don't differ in huge ways when it comes to what you learn. You can easily get a really poor education in English Language or History, but Chinese law is, well, law on paper really in some ways, and learning that properly is a lot towards your own responsibility. I'm probably writing my points a bit weirdly, sorry.

    I'm very aware that I would be making a sacrifice in potential education quality and degree worth, but a lot of it comes down to personal reasons. And because I've had reassurance that there are companies and unis in the UK which will value me.

    Anyway, I've not settled on studying in China. I just mentioned it as an option in my first post. I'm applying for both the UK and China.
    I very much respect your 'personal reasons' and I would most likely make such a decision based on them as well (in fact, I did). I don't think you would be unemployable in the UK - or in China for that matter - but you might have to sacrifice a degree from a decent university in the UK for a semi-well-known one in China which is completely unknown outside of China (possibly except for academia).

    When it comes to Chinese economics I hardly believe that this will be taught in a mostly unbiased way. But, then again, I did study exactly that at SOAS and it cannot be found elsewhere in the Western World except for very few other highly specialised institutions. Thus, it might be much more and much more adequate than what you could find elsewhere. Chinese law... I am not sure if there is much sense into studying it when the practical aspect lacks that much significance in China, though. For the literature/language aspect, yes, makes sense and I expect for obvious reasons China to be the right place to study about it (although I do believe that SOAS does a good job there, too).

    After all, from my perspective, it's about finding an agreement between 'not screwing up your life' on the one hand and 'personal reasons' on the other. I cannot help you with that (further). But it looks like you're asking the right questions.

    ??? <-? No zhongwen support? Well... jiayou
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    (Original post by YhA_kaede)
    I am from HK so I think I may help you abit. Since most HKers recognized that UK AL is much easier than HK's one, I strongly encourage u to study IB if u want to study in HK..and..I think u need at least 3 A* for econ.
    Actually, I have read the same advice a couple of times before - that an IB would be the better choice for foreign students when applying to HKU. I'm not sure where it was (not on here, though) but I expect this to be the case.

    (Just as a side note: there are [two?] other decent universities in HK as well)
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    (Original post by grt)
    Actually, I have read the same advice a couple of times before - that an IB would be the better choice for foreign students when applying to HKU. I'm not sure where it was (not on here, though) but I expect this to be the case.

    (Just as a side note: there are [two?] other decent universities in HK as well)
    Ya, although CUHK and HKUST are not as reputated as HKU internationally, we do consider them in the same range(or slightly lower than HKU, depends on which course u r applying to)

    To be honest, I dun think studying in HKU will be a good choice for UKers as u probably can go to Oxbridge wif the grades u need to go into HKU.
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    (Original post by grt)
    .

    When it comes to Chinese economics I hardly believe that this will be taught in a mostly unbiased way. But, then again, I did study exactly that at SOAS and it cannot be found elsewhere in the Western World except for very few other highly specialised institutions. Thus, it might be much more and much more adequate than what you could find elsewhere. Chinese law... I am not sure if there is much sense into studying it when the practical aspect lacks that much significance in China, though. For the literature/language aspect, yes, makes sense and I expect for obvious reasons China to be the right place to study about it (although I do believe that SOAS does a good job there, too).
    )
    Maybe in the UK but from an American most top universities have strong East Asia programs that are just as good for East Asia as SOAS and many of them are better.
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    (Original post by PKU_Research007)
    Maybe in the UK but from an American most top universities have strong East Asia programs that are just as good for East Asia as SOAS and many of them are better.
    Hm... To be honest I have not much of an idea about the higher education sector in the US. I had a quick look at Tufts and even they don't really have any China related economics course - which makes me think that they're not that common.

    Anyway, if you have any advice what US universities to consider for a PhD about China's political economy (probably related to foreign affairs, maybe trade [I'm trying to make up my mind in 2011] - but more from a political than purely economic point of view), let me know
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    don't look at tufts.....look at most of the ivy leagues...stanford...the UC system....Johns Hopkins SAIS.....University Hawaii.....Michigan University Anne Harbor. University of Wisconsin Madison, University of Washington Seattle... Maybe Boston College....NYU......Duke....Geor getown...WUSTL.......USC.....UNC Chapel Hill....Rice.....Boston University....MIT....and to be frank no top phD program in America will take a westerner who went to a Chinese university that wasn't the Big 7(Renmin, PKU, Tsinghua, Fudan, Shanghai Jiaotong, Zhejiang University, HIT) BUt only renmin PKU or fudan possibly tsinghua for Ir for humanities/social sciences. If you really want to go to a us university for phD stick to western schools. The quality of education is not comparable. In America Chinese universities and students not from "western re-organization" group are not what you would call....most favored areas. As someone who gives interviews for a top American universities to potential chinese candidates for the school's undergrad and grad programs in Beijing and sometimes in Chengdu, Shanghai, and Harbin its very obvious why we are taught to look at their applications not with a grain of salt, but with an entire salt mine.

    Also CHinese EConomics taught in CHina is actually classified as Marxist Economics.....thats the theory of what you would be studying which is what SOAS supposedly has. If I remember correctly Stanford Harvard Yale and Columbia have centers devoted to Chinese Economic policy....thats what you are interested in. JHU just got a new China center that is devoted to policy (foreign economics legal etc) USA schools are indeed expensive but the level of education is incomparable.
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    (Original post by PKU_Research007)
    don't look at tufts.....look at most of the ivy leagues...stanford...the UC system....Johns Hopkins SAIS.....University Hawaii.....Michigan University Anne Harbor. University of Wisconsin Madison, University of Washington Seattle... Maybe Boston College....NYU......Duke....Geor getown...WUSTL.......USC.....UNC Chapel Hill....Rice.....Boston University....MIT....and to be frank no top phD program in America will take a westerner who went to a Chinese university that wasn't the Big 7(Renmin, PKU, Tsinghua, Fudan, Shanghai Jiaotong, Zhejiang University, HIT) BUt only renmin PKU or fudan possibly tsinghua for Ir for humanities/social sciences. If you really want to go to a us university for phD stick to western schools. The quality of education is not comparable. In America Chinese universities and students not from "western re-organization" group are not what you would call....most favored areas. As someone who gives interviews for a top American universities to potential chinese candidates for the school's undergrad and grad programs in Beijing and sometimes in Chengdu, Shanghai, and Harbin its very obvious why we are taught to look at their applications not with a grain of salt, but with an entire salt mine.

    Also CHinese EConomics taught in CHina is actually classified as Marxist Economics.....thats the theory of what you would be studying which is what SOAS supposedly has. If I remember correctly Stanford Harvard Yale and Columbia have centers devoted to Chinese Economic policy....thats what you are interested in. JHU just got a new China center that is devoted to policy (foreign economics legal etc) USA schools are indeed expensive but the level of education is incomparable.
    I have been told that US Business degree= UK Economics degree but not US economics one as there are very few Quantitative related modules in US economics degree. What's your opinion?:confused:
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    (Original post by YhA_kaede)
    I have been told that US Business degree= UK Economics degree but not US economics one as there are very few Quantitative related modules in US economics degree. What's your opinion?:confused:
    Yeah who ever told you that is sorely misinformed.....economics at MIT Stanford JHU Upenn and other top programs are pure quant unless you are doing Social Economics.
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    (Original post by PKU_Research007)
    Yeah who ever told you that is sorely misinformed.....economics at MIT Stanford JHU Upenn and other top programs are pure quant unless you are doing Social Economics.
    Hence both business n economics are highly respected? Or the former will be slightly more respected than the latter one?
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    Hmmm I am almost fluent in chinese holding offers from Imperial, Warwick for Msc Finance pending Cambridge. Any point in me applying to universities in the east? I want to improve my Chinese, but still have good job prospects. I have work experience in risk and corporate finance.
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    (Original post by YhA_kaede)
    Hence both business n economics are highly respected? Or the former will be slightly more respected than the latter one?
    What do you want to do??? Most of these universities train economists for academia but are also recruited by the biggest finance firms in the world. And if your one of those I want to be an ibanker cause you can make a arseload of money then its better to go for an MBA.
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    (Original post by Ineedaplace)
    Hmmm I am almost fluent in chinese holding offers from Imperial, Warwick for Msc Finance pending Cambridge. Any point in me applying to universities in the east? I want to improve my Chinese, but still have good job prospects. I have work experience in risk and corporate finance.
    There is no such thing as "almost fluent" the term fluent is way too abused and after awhile gets obnoxious. Before I get reamed according to my logic "almost fluent" means you can read the entire chinese version of the economist and write a critical analysis of it in Chinese but stumble when giving an oral debate about it. Is that what you meant by almost fluent? All major MBA programs in China for foreigners are taught in english since they have IMBAs now to recruit foreign students. HKU doesn't teach anything in Mandarin the only course taught in Chinese which is Cantonese is the Chinese language and interpretation program. The best business programs in the "east" are CUHK HKIST and possibly HSBC School of Business Peking University Shenzhen but you need something like 8 years of experience for the latter. Tsinghua used to offer a dual MBA with MIT Sloane but that went sour. There are no MScs of finance in Asia just MBAs so unless you have the experience there is no reason to apply. Maybe in 5 years after China finishes modelings its top schools to be like America's top schools in order to make China the new hot spot for international education maybe it will be worth it but it will all be taught in english.
 
 
 
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