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    (Original post by joanna-eve)
    I'm not at university, but I live part-time in Cambridge and I've always found the central library in lion yard a good place to study.
    Its nice but seemed very noisy to me the few times I've been inside it :dontknow:
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    I had a peek into the Mill Lane library the other week and it looked nice. I spend most of my time in my college library or the library at the CMS though. The CMS library is delicious. Stay away, because I want it to myself.
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    (Original post by joanna-eve)
    It's all those damn kids i.e. me ! Haha. I also like walking out to Jesus Green or Midsummer Common and working there if the weather's nice and you don't mind being sniffed by a few dogs of course that won't work at the moment!
    Its more the Mum+annoying-screamy-kid combo which bugs me, so you're good :p:
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    (Original post by Craghyrax)
    Its more the Mum+annoying-screamy-kid combo which bugs me, so you're good :p:
    Good to know I'm not causing any problems how much extra study do you have to do per week?
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    (Original post by joanna-eve)
    Good to know I'm not causing any problems how much extra study do you have to do per week?
    What do you mean by 'extra study'? :p: I'm assuming that you mean how much do people do outside of lectures?
    In the Arts and Humanities subjects at undergraduate, people rely very little on lectures. They have them, but in subjects like History, English and Philosophy they're more seen as a sort of optional supplement to your learning. In more social sciencey subjects like Geography, Politics etc, then you tend to go to your lectures more faithfully but you still often have only about 6 - 8 hours of lectures a week.
    The real work takes place through the supervision system. Undergraduates often have about 2 - 3 supervisions a week. For each supervision you have a piece of work to prepare. In my undergrad degree - Politics, Psychology, Sociology, that usually amounted to two or three 2500-3000 word essays a week. You'd usually have covered roughly 6 texts for each essay and we almost never had more than three days to read and write up an essay. Most of this work happens in the library, or by you taking out the books and doing it in your room. In a supervision, the supervisor has read your essay and gives you constructive feedback and chats with you about the wider subject area.

    In a science subject, at undergrad, you have far more lectures which are compulsory, and lots of hours of labs. I think its more typical for them to be in lectures for about 35hours a week and to possibly have supervisions on top of that. They have small bits of work they do independently, but not as much of their work happens outside of lectures and supervisions as it does for Arts and Humanities students.

    For postgraduates its very different. Science postgraduates pretty much have a full time work schedule, going into labs something like 9-5 Monday - Friday. Arts students like myself have something like one big essay to write a month, and then a large independent research project to do over the course of the year, which is about 20,000 words and you collect your own data, do loads of reading, process your data and so on and so forth. Postgraduates also have some taught elements. For me I get 'research methods training' and this term I had about 10 - 12hrs of lectures a week, sometimes more or less.
    This thread has lots of posts from students giving 'a week in the life of a [insert subject] student' entries.
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    (Original post by joanna-eve)
    :eek: I had no idea there was that much essay writing every week! I kind of assumed that it was similar to school only instead of lessons you have lectures. I guess that's how they weed out the chavs then :L and I thought students were lazy... At least the degree I'm aiming for (MML) seems to have marginally less work!
    Yeah, not really :p: It's just a different kind of work. In first year I was doing three essays every two weeks, but as well as that I was doing literally loads of grammar and language work, so it definitely made up the shortfall. Plus, MMLers have more contact hours in a week than most arts subjects because you have all your language classes. All adds up. I was going to say that Year Abroad is a nice break, but I left work at 8.30pm today so not really
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    (Original post by joanna-eve)
    :eek: I had no idea there was that much essay writing every week! I kind of assumed that it was similar to school only instead of lessons you have lectures. I guess that's how they weed out the chavs then :L and I thought students were lazy... At least the degree I'm aiming for (MML) seems to have marginally less work!
    Hahah, they're more interested in trying to get more chavs into Cambridge than the other way round :p:

    Although the government is having none of that :sigh:
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    (Original post by joanna-eve)
    Naturally, but language learning is much easier than science learning (to me, at least). And more contact hours sounds better? That way if you have a question you can ask it insead of having to wait at risk or forgetting it. Three essays every two weeks doesn't sound too bad, what were they about? And anyway, learning languages is fun!
    There is nothing easy about any learning at Cambridge In first year I had one essay a week for Spanish and one every two weeks for Russian, but the amount of preparation that goes into an essay is mammoth. You have to read at least one book in the target language for them, which is really time consuming, and then all the background reading on the topic. A lot of the time it was just a thematic text analysis, so examining a medieval Spanish text in terms of its portrayal of honour and shame in society or something equivalent Later you are given a title such as ''Laughter with a lash.' Is this an accurate description of Russian satire?' and have to answer it referring to any number of relevant texts, usually two or three. I think the thing about MML at Cambridge is that when you arrive you discover that you enjoy one language more than the other, or you are vastly better at one part of the degree than another, because the things we study are so different. So for me, I'm much much better at the literature and history side than the language learning (with the exception of translation) and because it's so intense it's quite hard to keep everything balanced and you do end up favouring one thing more than all the others, which lessens the enjoyment somewhat. But the year abroad is a good break from that - I've rediscovered since I've been out here how much I love learning vocabulary and grammar Now that I actually have the time to do it!
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    (Original post by joanna-eve)
    The idea of chavs at oxbridge just seems odd, surely all the cultured people won't stand for that?
    The University doesn't discriminate on any grounds other than academic potential. The student body has people from a large range of backgrounds. Minorities are very underepresented, but that's alot to do with them not applying rather than the University not admitting them. There's a girl who comes from a gypsy/fair folk family who started last year.
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    (Original post by joanna-eve)
    That's fair enough since she can't help who her parents are. I was referring to someone who chooses to follow a chav lifestyle, such as someone who is lazy and nonacademic and rude. Someone who definitely wouldn't be participating in a thread like this as they would never go in a library!
    Yes I'll stop trying to be politically correct and agree that this wouldn't work :p: Still, I'm sure in the unlikely event that a chav wanted to go to Cambridge, s/he could continue to follow his 'lifestyle' on the side, so long as /she met his course requirements :p:
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    (Original post by Supermerp)
    I think that technically they're meant to go around and check whether or not the people remaining are allowed to stay (it used to involve a green sticker on your card. I only know because it was mentioned in an induction thingy) but that doesn't mean they do it.
    i think so ?buddy
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    I wonder if anyone who knows the university fairly well is willing to assist me? This coming Tuesday, (11th), I will be visiting Cambridge; I wish to know whether there is a particular area of the university that is worth a visit? Such as study areas etc.? Any assistance offered would be greatly appreciated! If it is of relevance, I wish to study a financial course.

    Thank you.
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    (Original post by Sunshine+Lollipops)
    I wonder if anyone who knows the university fairly well is willing to assist me? This coming Tuesday, (11th), I will be visiting Cambridge; I wish to know whether there is a particular area of the university that is worth a visit? Such as study areas etc.? Any assistance offered would be greatly appreciated! If it is of relevance, I wish to study a financial course.

    Thank you.
    I realise this is too late but you wouldn't easily have access to things like study areas without asking permission of the relevant department. Most departments and colleges will actually show you around and arrange for somebody to speak to you if you tell them in advance that you're planning a visit as a prospective student.
 
 
 
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