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    I adore the works of Siegfried Sassoon because of their signiture bitter and mocking tones that depict his frustration of war.
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    I think it's pretty difficult to come up with a definitive favourite, but at the moment maybe Spenser?
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    Dostoyevsky, Hamsun, Kafka in no particular order. That's on the top of my head right now, at least.
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    But why do you guys like these people?

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    (Original post by Dann)
    I think it's pretty difficult to come up with a definitive favourite, but at the moment maybe Spenser?
    :jumphug:
    If I really had to pick just one favourite, I'd probably go with Spenser as well. It's quite hard to get your head around his works, because there's always layers upon layers of meaning, but he's really worth the effort, even though it can be tough going sometimes. Extremely interesting in terms of how he uses language as well; Spenser's quite precise in his choice of words and phrases and will often add his own Spenserian spin to things... Also, he pretty much epitomises the period for me. I have yet to come across one major issue or theme of the late 16th century which you can't find in Spenser, so on top of being a brilliant author, he's also a very useful author to have read.:yep:
    [/gush]
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    any author that makes me think thoughts i would normally avoid, that reach me and engage me.examples include Ken Kesey Daniel Keyes or William Golding. all of them masters of descibing the 'human condition'.
    i can't recommend Flowers for Algernon enough.
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    Anything by Brontes (though not really keen about Wuthering heights) and Khaled Hosseini. :yep:
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    My favourite writer in general is probably Samuel Beckett, but I also really like E.E. Cummings and Gerard Manley Hopkins.
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    Albert Camus.

    I love his themes of Absurdism and the way he portrays them, especially in 'L'Etranger' and 'Le Mythe de Sisyphe'
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    Favourite author is a bit tough.... Probably a toss-up between Wodehouse, Waugh and Hemingway. Wodehouse and Waugh because they are utterly hilarious and always manage to cheer me up. Hemingway because the writing style is consistently refreshing.

    Favourite poets are Elliot, Coleridge and Milton. I like my poetry complex and epic.
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    My favourite poet is Jamal from across the street.

    The way he expresses his love for weed and casual sex is enchanting.
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    Poets; Edward Lear and Lewis Carroll. (Go nonsense poetry!)
    Because I formed a bit of an attachment to them when I was little (as people often do) and it's nice to occasionally have something that doesn't technically make sense. People love being bamboozled, they love new words and feeling like a little kid again, which is what poems like The Walrus and The Carpenter or The Pobble Who Has No Toes do.
    Plus the fact that you can hardly say that nonsense poetry has had no effect on literature, how many times have you heard '"The time has come," the Walrus said / "To talk of many things: /Of shoes, and ships, and sealing-wax / Of cabbages and kings / And why the sea is boiling hot / And whether pigs have wings."' quoted? (: it's even in War Literature.
    It's hardly the best explanation or analysis of things, but you know, I assumed most people on here would be putting down things which are a little more serious. If you wanted a kind of jolly, uplifting, nonsensical side to poetry that is not completely worthless, there you go. (:

    Plus, this is just the best poem ever;
    http://www.nonsenselit.org/Lear/ns/jumblies.html
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    (Original post by finestory)
    '"The time has come," the Walrus said / "To talk of many things: /Of shoes, and ships, and sealing-wax / Of cabbages and kings / And why the sea is boiling hot / And whether pigs have wings."'
    You have good taste. I love that!
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    Sarah Waters for Fingersmith - if you haven't read it, DO. Don't google the plot, best read without a clue about it past the vague blurb. I did and it's damn near the best book I've read.

    A nice leisure read for after you've done the interview and need to chill might be the Troy series by David Gemmell.
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    (Original post by hobnob)
    :jumphug:
    If I really had to pick just one favourite, I'd probably go with Spenser as well. It's quite hard to get your head around his works, because there's always layers upon layers of meaning, but he's really worth the effort, even though it can be tough going sometimes. Extremely interesting in terms of how he uses language as well; Spenser's quite precise in his choice of words and phrases and will often add his own Spenserian spin to things... Also, he pretty much epitomises the period for me. I have yet to come across one major issue or theme of the late 16th century which you can't find in Spenser, so on top of being a brilliant author, he's also a very useful author to have read.:yep:
    [/gush]
    We have good taste.
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    (Original post by Dann)
    We have good taste.
    I couldn't agree more.
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    David Brin is probably my favourite author. He writes very good sci-fi.

    The first books of his I read were the two uplift trilogies. They're fantastic books that give you snapshots of the universe he's creating, weaving fantastically written stories with interesting plots into a picture painted of the whole society he's invented. The closest I've ever come to something like it is the Lord of the Rings.

    Yesterday I finished reading The Postman, which still creates a world which he explores a little (this time a post-apocalyptic earth rather than an intergalactic civilisation), but this time he more hints at ethical questions about rights and the greater good. Again, it's a pretty good story (not the best though) and unputdownable. Definitely my favourite author, and I'd recommend his books to anyone who likes fiction at all. It works in so many different genres.
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    Many people write him off, or simply associate him with "Lady Chatterley", but D.H Lawrence is truly marvellous. "Sons and Lovers" is fantastically clever. He's not too bad a poet either.
    William Blake is an astute poet, because he critiques society very subtly.
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    (Original post by xxxfairymaryxxx)
    I agree about the metaphysical poets, their concepts and ideas were so new and fresh but at the same time hugely powerful - it just goes to show that a new unexpected metaphor can be so much stronger and more effective than a clichéd, overused one!

    Is the Lovesong of Alfred J Prufrock by T.S Eliot?That sounds interesting, I shall have to take a look at that one. I have shied off looking at Eliot properly, as I've never studied him in any depth other than amongst anthologies of mixed poems. From what I can gather, though, his poems are incredibly sensuous - "The winter's evening settles down with smell of steaks in alleyways.." or something along those lines =)
    It is. Personally, I found Eliot quite inaccessible, some of his poetry I still do find as such, particularly Four Quartets. However The Lovesong is brilliant, and the Waste Land is very good also, although expect little from Eliot's own notes on the Waste Land, because you'll get little.
    The poem you referenced last is called Preludes, also pretty good. And if you like The Great Gatsby, read Preludes, and definitely read the Waste Land, and you'll notice some similarities.
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    (Original post by xxxfairymaryxxx)
    But why do you guys like these people?

    x
    I like TS Eliot because I identify with him. He was frustrated by the apparent futility and meaningless of life, and I often feel the same way. Solidarity is imperative in any piece of writing.
 
 
 
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