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For people that got A's or A*'s last year - AS/A2 what is your study routine? Watch

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    (Original post by Anonymous-)
    *Subscribes* Teehee
    Is it a literal subscribe, or a "I'll frequently come back to this" subscribe, because me don't know how to
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    (Original post by Hippysnake)
    Here's what I did-

    Walk into room, see textbook on floor, read textbook until distracted, drop textbook and repeat.

    Closer to the exams it was-
    Walk into room, see past papers on desk, do a couple, read textbook until distracted, get 3A*s -> PROFIT?
    bruv i was having s3x yeah in da exam hall and mans got A* so i fink i clock u silly.
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    Heres some golden advice:

    Make an A-map/revision map/spider diagram thingy. Trust me, I didnt believe it would work until I tried it. Every exam I created a revision map for resulted in an A. Make one, look at it for a while, then fold it away and put it in your pocket. Whenever you arent doing anything, just glance at it. This helps if you are a visual person- the coloured lines will help you remember information. I can't guarentee it will work for you but it worked for me. Timetables dont work on me
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    I think study routine's will differ with everyone.
    For me, I revised what I wanted when I felt like it.
    And in the weeks before the exams I looked at the specifications and wrote notes on the bits I needed to know and examples where necessary, I didn't move on from a point until I was satisfied I understood it, and I stuck these notes to my bedroom walls so I saw them often.
    But as I say, that's what I did, and it won't work for everyone

    EDIT:Oh and I always got told to do spider diagrams, I never did, hate the things. Can't fit enough detail onto them, and mine always looked too disorganised so useless in that way too :rolleyes:
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    My weekday routine is the same every day:

    Classtime: Drink coke, chat, leave the classroom several times to go splash water on my face in an attempt to wake up. Be tired.

    Get Home: learn what i was supposed to do in class.

    Evening: Mess about for a couple of hours, start revision at 12, finish at 3/4.

    No timetable.
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    Timetables make revision come across more like work and if something pops up once, and then again, and again eventually the timetable will fall to pieces.
    Just make sure you revise! If you want A-A* then you're the sort of person that knows how much to get your head down.
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    Do **** all for the whole year, then lock yourself in your room 1-2 months leading up to the exam period. This includes giving up your social life the couple of weeks before your first exam.

    I still shudder when I think back to those days, but it pays off in the end.
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    I dunno, I'm way too ADD to just sit there and timetable. The physical act of timetabling stuff properly would be too much for my brain, seriously, lol. Anyway, basically what I did for my non-maths subjects was look through the January paper and specimen (or last summer's and specimen if the exam's in January) and knock off the questions that come up as stuff I don't have to think about (worked very well in Politics and History of Art, where I had three areas to revise and two were asked in those papers, so I just revised the one and lo and behold it came up on the exam and I was set lol). Then, the night before and just before the exam, read over any essays you've done (to get you in the mood) and any other notes that might help. Pass exam.

    For maths, I did a bit more. Started the week before and just did practice papers until the exam. Pass exam.

    Just be efficient with your time: don't revise something you know for the sake of it. Also, don't revise something you don't understand. Make sure you understand it first (ask someone, read up some more, whatever works for you) and only then try and remember it. Otherwise, you're just wasting your time, right?
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    Night before?
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    No routine for studying, but my AS and A2 exams followed a similar patter: A couple of weeks before the exams I summarised literally everything onto spider diagrams on A3 paper and all class time was dedicated to past papers. This simmers on until about 2 days before the exam when I go ****ing mental and start sleeping with my notes.

    It works for me.
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    Did essays and classwork. Made notes at the time. About a month before the exams I started handing in extra exam prep essays and made revision notes about two weeks (in some cases two days) before the exams.

    It varies from person to person although I believe putting in the effort when you're set homework throughout the year really helps more than rigid revision schemes.
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    WOW at some of these recommendations.

    I simply CRAMMED about a week before. Gave myself a break, and tried to rewrite as much as possible. Note all the things i didn't get down...then guess what? CRAMMMMMMM some more.
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    (Original post by antta101)
    WOW at some of these recommendations.

    I simply CRAMMED about a week before. Gave myself a break, and tried to rewrite as much as possible. Note all the things i didn't get down...then guess what? CRAMMMMMMM some more.
    You're probably naturally smart though.
    Im naturally really stupid so need all the help i can get! lol
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    For quotes and such: Memory palace
    I recommend that for any appliance of structuring quotes into your essays and even dates for the less mathematical.
    For the rest, just past papers and looking over what I did in class. The hardest for me was the "learning by definition", which I found tedious, pointless and simply not education in the original sense. Although, I did get through it in the end
    Hehe, just realised this was for AS/A2, ah well, a bit of Scottish input never hurt anyone!
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    (Original post by forgottensecret)
    Is it a literal subscribe, or a "I'll frequently come back to this" subscribe, because me don't know how to
    A literal subscribe, you complete and utter lower colon.
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    (Original post by Marie-Claire)
    Well before my January modules I got pneumonia and was in hospital then on bed rest for several weeks before the exams, so I just read my notes in between sleeping 16 hours a day, more or less. I suggest you don't do this.


    My first reaction was to say 'you had it coming'... but nah what did it feel like??
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    (Original post by Shinryuken15)
    I see, that seems simple and effective... The problem i'm having is how to "see textbook on floor, read textbook" instead of "see Playstation on floor, play Playstation!" lol
    How did you overcome temptations that could potentially stop you from doing any work?
    What works best for me is a room with no distractions.

    I do all my revision in the dining room where there is just a big table and a chair. When I go in, I close the door behind me and know it's time to study. When I go out I know I can relax and have a break. If you study in the same room as your PC / TV / games console there's way too much temptation to go play :P
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    (Original post by Bubbles0ox)
    You're probably naturally smart though.
    Im naturally really stupid so need all the help i can get! lol
    I don't think knowledge stays in your head if you do it that way. You know everything for a short while and then forget in the future. Small and focused revising will stick in your brain imo
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    (Original post by aliakhtar)
    I don't think knowledge stays in your head if you do it that way. You know everything for a short while and then forget in the future. Small and focused revising will stick in your brain imo
    small and focused revising sounds good

    thanks
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    (Original post by Shinryuken15)
    I see, that seems simple and effective... The problem i'm having is how to "see textbook on floor, read textbook" instead of "see Playstation on floor, play Playstation!" lol
    How did you overcome temptations that could potentially stop you from doing any work?
    I did see it. I worked for like 15 minute blocks, then played my PlayStation or Xbox. Sometimes I even did both together. I was revising between online matches and shizz.
 
 
 
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