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Intelligence- Are Academic grades a measure of ones abilities? Watch

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    Nope, because some people who have the best qualifications are socially inept and lack common sense.Tbh it's pretty sad if you can do mechanical engineering but can't boil a kettle.
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    (Original post by rajandkwameali)
    Intelligence is how you get on in life, and in the world.

    Many academic people are dolts by how they act in life.

    You're confusing IQ and EG, cognitive intelligence and emotional intelligence... 2 very different things.
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    (Original post by royal1990)
    From a personal point of view also, I think that everyone low or high scoring students should be given 'free reign' over what Education they can attain. As opposed to offering the 'best' candidates the best places. Although fair play, these students work hard and have 100% determination I agree with this, and so they deserve a good university place. Nevertheless, the shy, the outspoken, the academically challenged, the brightest should all be given places at any given university. There should be more of an acceptance towards the whole broader range of students. For example, those students which tend to fail exams and who don't prosper in traditional settings in education should be granted places at any university, as long as they posses the commitment and the passion to show/prove their causes. I think that some teachers in schools do favour the students perceived to be more intellectual, which is in essence morally wrong. I think this is the reason, that the students sink into more of a depression over their own educational experiences, and additionally they are being neglected in my opinion.

    In conclusion, because these lesser performing students are been ignored they don't learn nor prosper any further. I think that those professionals in education should take steps to reintroduce and encourage teaching of all students, regardless of social class. Because although people may say that this used to happen decades ago (about the smarter candidates been nurtured and others ignored)- it still happens, but isn't noticed as much.
    In all fairness yes they do - to an extent. Sometimes certain subjects or styles of examinations are suited to certain people, but it is always the case that the most committed students with the most passion for their chosen university course are the ones who actually work really hard in order to earn their place at university, by earning good grades.

    Almost every single candidate will have a desire to study their course and commitment or else why would they even apply?

    And with the comment you made about the smarter candidates been nurtured and others ignored, perhaps it is just my school, but the smarter more well behaved pupils are expected to do well and don't receive any praise, whereas the less smart candidates get praised for some of the most insignificant accomplishments. But as I said this might just be my school.

    I really hope this did not come across as arrogant or anything It sounded fine when I wrote it.
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    IQ and academic grades play no part in being intelligent. Intelligence is so much more than a few letters scribbled onto a bit of paper that basically says you can dance to the educational drum. You could say these systems are vital in the world we live in and to disregard them is foolish, but the most successful people in the world didn't need grades, only a solid grasp of what they need to succeed.

    Its like all these graduates i see going into recruitment or junior finance or poor office jobs or on the dole bragging about having a degree and 'waiting to fall into something', they are on the same level of intelligence as the people who did apprenticeships straight after GCSE's who are now earning well as electricians or brickies.

    I have a friend who is a total photoshop wiz who was on my photography course. I mean he could make a dull village photo of Dawn French look like a sexy martian Cheryl Cole standing on the red planet surrounded by galaxies and it would look like i just took it on my film camera. He is working in a small studio in London because 'he enjoys it more.

    This is a prime example of a good academic/not intelligent as he got a 1st. He could of got one of the many £80k a year retoucher jobs at any of the thousands of digital companies about who need superb visuals and then BUY his own studio and do what he enjoys when he wants to, take a year out, do some stuff, go back into work or even start his own studio etc etc. But he 'doesn't really like digital photography' I also have a friend who wants to go around Europe with a band although he is in Mensa...

    An idiot fails to grasp opportunity. They have the knowledge but lack the understanding or the will to apply it. Its not a case of 'oh if he enjoys it thats all good' because at the end of the day success, satisfaction and opportunity go hand in hand in life. If you hide behind the satisfaction curtain you just show you fail at basic understanding of how to gain success doing what you enjoy and are content being second best even though you have the tools to succeed.
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    (Original post by EggmanD)
    IQ and academic grades play no part in being intelligent. Intelligence is so much more than a few letters scribbled onto a bit of paper that basically says you can dance to the educational drum. You could say these systems are vital in the world we live in and to disregard them is foolish, but the most successful people in the world didn't need grades, only a solid grasp of what they need to succeed.

    Its like all these graduates i see going into recruitment or junior finance or poor office jobs or on the dole bragging about having a degree and 'waiting to fall into something', they are on the same level of intelligence as the people who did apprenticeships straight after GCSE's who are now earning well as electricians or brickies.

    I have a friend who is a total photoshop wiz who was on my photography course. I mean he could make a dull village photo of Dawn French look like a sexy martian Cheryl Cole standing on the red planet surrounded by galaxies and it would look like i just took it on my film camera. He is working in a small studio in London because 'he enjoys it more.

    This is a prime example of a good academic/not intelligent as he got a 1st. He could of got one of the many £80k a year retoucher jobs at any of the thousands of digital companies about who need superb visuals and then BUY his own studio and do what he enjoys when he wants to, take a year out, do some stuff, go back into work or even start his own studio etc etc. But he 'doesn't really like digital photography' I also have a friend who wants to go around Europe with a band although he is in Mensa...

    An idiot fails to grasp opportunity. They have the knowledge but lack the understanding or the will to apply it. Its not a case of 'oh if he enjoys it thats all good' because at the end of the day success, satisfaction and opportunity go hand in hand in life. If you hide behind the satisfaction curtain you just show you fail at basic understanding of how to gain success doing what you enjoy and are content being second best even though you have the tools to succeed.
    Huh, so you're equating 'true intelligence' with money made/opportunities to make money taken??

    I think the OP was talking about a distinction between grades and some sort of innate ability, not an attitude that money=success=good.
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    There are other factors to consider, such as laziness.
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    No, most intellectual academic people are social and sexual mongoloids. Look at that MI6 guy, academic genius and he ends his life in some most probably homoerotic sex game in a bath full of water cuffed up in a dry bag.

    I'd define intelligence as the awareness of what one needs to be happy and self actualized, and knowing the means be which to get it. In the end that's all that matters.
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    (Original post by Bunkd)
    Intelligence is quite simply making the correct choices in a given situation.

    Clearly, doing well in exams is a very good choice. Ergo, yes, everyone who gets good grades is intelligent (to varying degrees). After all, going to Cambridge is a good idea; coasting through school and just getting average grades whilst holding out to be a singer or something is a bad idea.
    Depends if going to Cambridge is the best thing for you. If you're one of the many 'can't handle the pressure' Cambridge suicides, it was clearly not the best choice. If you're a borderline alcoholic by the end, it clearly wasn't the best choice.
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    That's all very well - but e.g. for my course, if you can't pass the exams, you obviously don't know enough and would kill people!
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    (Original post by mdr)
    Huh, so you're equating 'true intelligence' with money made/opportunities to make money taken??

    I think the OP was talking about a distinction between grades and some sort of innate ability, not an attitude that money=success=good.

    Intelligence is utilizing logic and knowledge not scoring high on tests or figuring out a puzzle quicker than someone else. I was just using this in a money making/earning a living method as i thought it was the easiest to understand.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    :nooo:
    What's up, Ashley?
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    (Original post by EggmanD)
    Intelligence is utilizing logic and knowledge not scoring high on tests or figuring out a puzzle quicker than someone else. I was just using this in a money making/earning a living method as i thought it was the easiest to understand.
    You're talking about motivation i.e.) using one's intelligence. A person may well see the possibilities of doing x, y and z but just can't be bothered doing it. If he's not motivated to do it, then he won't. It's not a case of not being smart enough to see that (based on how people normally define intelligence). If he doesn't judge success on monetary terms, assets or other quantifiable means then that's his perogative and it's arrogant to suggest he is 'wrong'. But it doesn't make him less 'intelligent'. He might just enjoy doing (useless) problems that others are not able to do.
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    (Original post by Physics Enemy)
    You're talking about motivation i.e.) using one's intelligence. A person may well see the possibilities of doing x, y and z but just can't be bothered doing it. If he's not motivated to do it, then he won't. It's not a case of not being smart enough to see that (based on how people normally define intelligence). If he doesn't judge success on monetary terms, assets or other quantifiable means then that's his perogative and it's arrogant to suggest he is 'wrong'. But it doesn't make him less 'intelligent'. He might just enjoy doing (useless) problems that others are not able to do.
    In general i was calling IQ tests and exams useless lol

    Yes what im saying could be arrogant, but from my point of view limiting yourself in a small studio for a pittance is a moronic choice when you can limit yourself in a big digital company for more money.

    Now, do you;

    A) work in a studio like anyone else could for a living wage hardly using the skills you have and enjoy the setting but not the creative freedom or
    B) work in a job where your motivation is not as high and you dont enjoy it too much but with the skills you have you can earn double to 10x the amount of money and then save for your own studio where you set your own creative freedoms.


    The stupid choice is A. He is both impatient and foolish content being second best and ignoring his potential to succeed. Even if he is not interested in money and he is looking for the satisfaction of creation, B will give him a hundred times what A would.
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    (Original post by royal1990)
    Nevertheless, the shy, the outspoken, the academically challenged, the brightest should all be given places at any given university. There should be more of an acceptance towards the whole broader range of students. For example, those students which tend to fail exams and who don't prosper in traditional settings in education should be granted places at any university, as long as they posses the commitment and the passion to show/prove their causes.
    Whilst I don't believe that academic grades are the sole or even best indicator of intelligence, I think you're being rather optimistic in saying that such people should be granted places at any university. Despite being someone who would have probably been put on one had such things existed, I'm not in favour of the idea of foundation years at Oxford or Cambridge. Partly because of the social and intellectual divides that would no doubt crop up, but also because it's just not fair to put someone in that environment if they're not suited to it or would be able to cope. Commitment and passion are all well and good but sometimes they are just not enough :nah:
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    They're certainly a measure, but not the be all and end all of intelligence.
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    I think grades usually reflect how hard someone has worked, although not always. I don't think grades by themselves say much about a persons intelligence or potential. They just reflect a baseline of knowledge which is helpful when applying for university courses as it indicates which applicants are best prepared for the course in terms of knowledge, other wise the first year of uni would be taken up with remedial classes to get people to the required level where they can tackle the actual course.
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    (Original post by TWF)
    Nope. Everybody getting A's left, right and centre. It's all about hard work and practice, knowing the exam technique and remembering your stuff.
    No, they aren't. Maybe in TSR but in the real world only 1 in 4 entries - 26.7% - received the top grade (then A) at A level.
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    Grades are a rough measure of intelligence. Getting good grades doesn't mean you are intelligent and neither does getting crappy grades mean you are stupid. But the people who get the best grades will do the best in life.
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    They don't reflect true potential, no.
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    You can't compare IQ to grades as if they measure the same things. IQ measure ONE thing - and that is the IQ. It's how you perform on those specific logic tasks, and that's it. My great-grandfather was part of launching IQ tests in Europe, but refused to launch them in schools as a type of measurement, because they are irrelevant that way.

    At least grades are grades. A combination of effort, comprehension, your background knowledge and intellectual capacity. Some teachers can be quite biased and grade unfairly, so certainly it isn't always a true measurement. Depends what you're comparing it to - social skills is just one part of it. You can say a person with straight As from Oxbridge may be a social loser, but so be it, I wouldn't refer to him as an idiot.
 
 
 
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