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I am poor and want to do a 2nd degree...how to fund this? Watch

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      (Original post by blue_shift86)
      hiya,

      i've just finished a geophysics degree but i wasn't entirely happy with it nor felt fulfilled. I want to go to uni to do maths or biology. I was wondering how i could go about funding further study as i've heard you only get government funding just the once. Any ideas? I know the obvious thing would do to be to get a job, save up, then go again, but that'll take years! Any other ideas?

      blue.
      I worked for two years so I could save up and pay for my MA. I also elected to do it part-time so that I could spread the fees, and enjoy the degree more if I'm honest. Obviously it depends on your circumstances but that's the method I'd recommend, the only problem being is that it's not that easy to get a job at all right now, at least not here in the North East.

      There usually is funding (the university will advise you on the application process) but it's highly competitive, far too many people apply than will ever see it. I certainly didn't get it for my masters even though I had been awarded a first in my undergraduate degree, so don't be too hopeful on this count.

      I'd like to think I could do the same for a future PhD as I did for my masters but at around four and a half grand a year for (at least) three years it's not looking likely, I think I'll have to leave it at the masters in my case.
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      Just do a part time masters or something. Do you really need a whole undergraduate degree? A MSc would look far better than 2x BSc.
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      (Original post by I<3LAMP)
      Oh dear, ok I may need to prostitute myself,

      Any takers? :sigh:
      Isn't graduate medicine an exception to the no funding rule ?

      Or something like the NHS pays for half the degree is in place ?

      There is definitely something that helps graduate medics.
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      (Original post by Lord Nice)
      Sorry, I found it quite a struggle; I didn't even know when you were inside me
      take on someone with a far bigger penis then like me, ill *** on your face if you want
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      (Original post by mackemforever)
      Live with it.

      You didn't do your research properly and so you chose the wrong course. Surely you would have realised that you were not a fan of the course within the first year, at which point you could have changed to something you liked more, or dropped out and reapplied.

      Also, you must have known before you went travelling that you wanted to do a 2nd degree, so why didn't you stay at home rather than travelling so you had some money to start your 2nd degree.

      As thing stand you have 1 option, get a job, save up, and then apply again a few years down the line.
      Exactly.
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      (Original post by Arenas123)
      Isn't graduate medicine an exception to the no funding rule ?

      Or something like the NHS pays for half the degree is in place ?

      There is definitely something that helps graduate medics.
      The NHS pays for 3/4 of the very competitive GEP courses and only 1/5th of the fees for the 5yr courses. E.g. you have to pay £12k up-front, or £36k up-front when the fees rise.

      Some people get half a maintenance loan to feed themselves with. Most people take out high-street bank loans to pay for their living costs, however.
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      (Original post by babygirl110)
      That's why I'm glad the govt only funds degrees once. People take the piss, how someone can choose a degree that's not right for them is beyond me.

      If you are really motivated then you will work and save up for a masters or whatever you plan to do. There are also bank career development loans available.

      Maybe it's time for the workplace and to gain a bit of maturity. It's no longer the nanny state and rightfully so.
      At 16-19 years old, people are still going through the transition to adulthood. It can be an unstable period of time with many going through several mood swings towards one subject and others. You may say that people should read round the course before commiting to it and I agree with this, research is always important. However, the actual experience that one gets from their course and their expectations prior to starting can be very different. Sure, you could even argue that they should drop out near the beginning of the course if they didn't like it, but bear in mind, its a bold and courageous step to quit something that you've hyped about for several months or even years.
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      (Original post by mackemforever)
      Live with it.

      You didn't do your research properly and so you chose the wrong course. Surely you would have realised that you were not a fan of the course within the first year, at which point you could have changed to something you liked more, or dropped out and reapplied.
      For me, studying my degree is what led to my academic development which subsequently fed my disatisfaction for the subject. Hence I am choosing to do a second degree.

      I would never have realised this had I not studied my first degree.

      It isn't as simple as 'doing the research'.
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      (Original post by Oswy)
      I worked for two years so I could save up and pay for my MA. I also elected to do it part-time so that I could spread the fees, and enjoy the degree more if I'm honest. Obviously it depends on your circumstances but that's the method I'd recommend, the only problem being is that it's not that easy to get a job at all right now, at least not here in the North East.

      There usually is funding (the university will advise you on the application process) but it's highly competitive, far too many people apply than will ever see it. I certainly didn't get it for my masters even though I had been awarded a first in my undergraduate degree, so don't be too hopeful on this count.

      I'd like to think I could do the same for a future PhD as I did for my masters but at around four and a half grand a year for (at least) three years it's not looking likely, I think I'll have to leave it at the masters in my case.
      You could apply for a full time PhD, apply to as many funding sources as possible and if you weren't successful, ask to do it part time. There are teaching opportunities available to PhD students, too (some are part of the degree) which is a useful source of income.

      I'm thinking of doing a PhD part time. 6 years is a long time but I have other commitments (a baby), ruling out full time study.
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        (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
        For me, studying my degree is what led to my academic development which subsequently fed my disatisfaction for the subject. Hence I am choosing to do a second degree.

        I would never have realised this had I not studied my first degree.

        It isn't as simple as 'doing the research'.
        Just out of curiosity, what was the original subject you lost interest in?
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          (Original post by tigermoth99)
          You could apply for a full time PhD, apply to as many funding sources as possible and if you weren't successful, ask to do it part time. There are teaching opportunities available to PhD students, too (some are part of the degree) which is a useful source of income.

          I'm thinking of doing a PhD part time. 6 years is a long time but I have other commitments (a baby), ruling out full time study.
          Thanks. Yeah, I'm looking at those kinds of options I'm just going through a pessimistic phase right now
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          (Original post by Oswy)
          Just out of curiosity, what was the original subject you lost interest in?
          Psych. Realised I wanted to do medicine in my first year. I'm now a third year in the application cycle.
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          (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
          For me, studying my degree is what led to my academic development which subsequently fed my disatisfaction for the subject. Hence I am choosing to do a second degree.

          I would never have realised this had I not studied my first degree.

          It isn't as simple as 'doing the research'.
          Exactly, we were 17/18 ffs when we had to try and determine which path we go down later in life. We can't all be absolutely certain. :rolleyes:

          (Original post by GodspeedGehenna)
          The NHS pays for 3/4 of the very competitive GEP courses and only 1/5th of the fees for the 5yr courses. E.g. you have to pay £12k up-front, or £36k up-front when the fees rise.

          Some people get half a maintenance loan to feed themselves with. Most people take out high-street bank loans to pay for their living costs, however.
          You got there before me.

          Shame its not easier but that's life eh?
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          (Original post by I<3LAMP)
          I disagree, I studied biomed because I genuinely enjoyed it and wanted to work in the field, however as I got more involved in the course I decided that I wanted to study medicine and work in the public sector.

          There are numerous reasons why people decide to do a degree in a particular field, be it money, peer/family pressure or because they have a particular affinity for that subject.

          Choosing a degree at 18 can be a mentally tiring process and whilst at Uni many, many people I knew had no idea what they wanted to do in life. Some did Masters to try and focus their interest in something specific, some abandoned their original courses altogether for other things and others have just enjoyed life for a bit.

          OP you can receive (maintenance)loans as far as I am aware however you will not be eligible for the tuition fee loan. You can apply for a bank loan which can tide you over for a little while but you will need to find paid work.

          I am going down the same route this year and its not going to be easy. Just make sure you genuinely want to do this and that it will benefit you in the long run.
          This suggests to me that people going to university are obviously a bit immature to be making important decisions such as choosing the right university degree and possibly need to take time out in the workplace before making such huge decisions. I'm glad the coalition government is putting an end to this nanny state otherwise how will people effectively make career decisions if they are handed things on a plate? I'm glad EMA has been scrapped (I hope whatever they have replaced it with is most appropriate). I'm also glad people like the OP will be unable to get a maintenance grant for their second degree. I'm also glad tuition fees has been raised because that way people will start seriously considering the decisions they make when they go to university and it will also bring back value to university education.

          I accept that we all make career shifts and changes but then we need to take full responsibility for that. Why can't the OP accept responsibility for his mistake and self-fund a Masters in Maths? That's because he is used to the nanny state that hands everything on a plate and so he wants to know if they can pay for another degree for him, that's absolutely absurd. If it means taking a few years to work then to do that. If he wants it so much then he will commit to doing so.

          I know someone who wanted to do medicine but didn't manage to achieve the grades she needed and so chose to do biomed with the view to go into medicine from then. There was a clear career focus and she also committed to self funding her career therefore, I don't quite liken your situation to the OP's. The OP expects to receive funding for his education, it's not quite the same because he's not taking responsibility.
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          (Original post by W.H.T)
          At 16-19 years old, people are still going through the transition to adulthood. It can be an unstable period of time with many going through several mood swings towards one subject and others. You may say that people should read round the course before commiting to it and I agree with this, research is always important. However, the actual experience that one gets from their course and their expectations prior to starting can be very different. Sure, you could even argue that they should drop out near the beginning of the course if they didn't like it, but bear in mind, its a bold and courageous step to quit something that you've hyped about for several months or even years.
          This suggests to me that some people are a bit too immature to be making those decisions at that age whilst others are ready to make those solid career decisions. That's why university education shouldn't be for everyone.

          EDIT: It's also fair enough if they make a mistake and want to change but then they should commit to self funding their new ventures. Why do they expect funding to come from other sources other than themselves? Nanny state comes to mind.
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          (Original post by babygirl110)
          This suggests to me that people going to university are obviously a bit immature to be making important decisions such as choosing the right university degree and possibly need to take time out in the workplace before making such huge decisions. I'm glad the coalition government is putting an end to this nanny state otherwise how will people effectively make career decisions if they are handed things on a plate? I'm glad EMA has been scrapped (I hope whatever they have replaced it with is most appropriate). I'm also glad people like the OP will be unable to get a maintenance grant for their second degree. I'm also glad tuition fees has been raised because that way people will start seriously considering the decisions they make when they go to university and it will also bring back value to university education.

          I accept that we all make career shifts and changes but then we need to take full responsibility for that. Why can't the OP accept responsibility for his mistake and self-fund a Masters in Maths? That's because he is used to the nanny state that hands everything on a plate and so he wants to know if they can pay for another degree for him, that's absolutely absurd. If it means taking a few years to work then to do that. If he wants it so much then he will commit to doing so.

          I know someone who wanted to do medicine but didn't manage to achieve the grades she needed and so chose to do biomed with the view to go into medicine from then. There was a clear career focus and she also committed to self funding her career therefore, I don't quite liken your situation to the OP's. The OP expects to receive funding for his education, it's not quite the same because he's not taking responsibility.
          From reading the OP I did not get the impression that they wanted it to be funded by the state specifically, I thought the OP was asking if there were other options other than saving up and paying in cold hard cash in advance by working. Being in debt is hardly an easy way out!

          As you rightly said there are bank loans (they don't last long) and yes I do agree that we should be responsible for our decisions. I expect to have another 5 or 6 years of poor hell before I begin to enjoy a nice bank balance again, no pain, no gain.

          One of Labour's initiatives was to get 50% of our youth into Uni, which quite ultimately clogs up funding and devalues our degrees. I remember being encouraged to go to Uni when I was 16 as apparently I would earn more money if I had a degree and lead to more possibilities. Quite frankly all of us have been fed this pipe-dream and unfortunately the sheer number of us will fail to reap the benefits we thought we were entitled to. I'm working in security, so my degree is not put to very good use!

          The OP will have to work for this one, a degree is a luxury asset, hardly something that is entitled to all.
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          (Original post by babygirl110)
          This suggests to me that some people are a bit too immature to be making those decisions at that age whilst others are ready to make those solid career decisions. That's why university education should* be for everyone.

          EDIT: It's also fair enough if they make a mistake and want to change but then they should commit to self funding their new ventures. Why do they expect funding to come from other sources other than themselves? Nanny state comes to mind.
          * shouldn't...and I think there should be other means of gaining skills in the workplace..apprenticeships, on the job training, etc etc
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          (Original post by I<3LAMP)
          * shouldn't...and I think there should be other means of gaining skills in the workplace..apprenticeships, on the job training, etc etc
          Oops, typo. I'm sure you know what I meant though, I think I've been very clear about where I stand on this issue.

          With regards to your previous post, yeah I agree with you but I thought that it was important to drum the point to the OP that he needs to take responsibility for his decisions. If it means taking time to work hard in order to pay for his education then he should and then maybe he will value it more.

          Off topic: I'm fascinated by how he managed to go travelling whilst burdened with the uncertainty of his career choices. It even makes me chuckle when he says he got home sick and that's why he chose to return earlier than planned. When I read such things it just makes me think that some people just take the piss.
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          Study abroad.
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          Other locations outside the UK would be cheaper
         
         
         
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