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    (Original post by DerPumuckl)
    IBD is **** compared to S&T. Fact.

    And don't give me that bull about exit ops, your job is so ****, you want to exit it before it starts.
    You are an idiot. Fact.
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    IBD and Trading will attract different people based on their levels of risk aversion.

    Personally, I would much rather take a shot at something I think I can really enjoy (trading) and at the same time get paid a great salary to hold a lottery ticket than doing monkey work for 2 years with the aim of reaching greener pastures.
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    I don't want to be flamed or anything, but which degree is the most appropriate - one that would teach you the technical aspects mentioned? Economics? Finance? Investment?
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    (Original post by derivstrader)
    IBD and Trading will attract different people based on their levels of risk aversion.

    Personally, I would much rather take a shot at something I think I can really enjoy (trading) and at the same time get paid a great salary to hold a lottery ticket than doing monkey work for 2 years with the aim of reaching greener pastures.

    What do you trade?
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    (Original post by Teenage Pirate)
    You S&T guys like fetching coffee/ lunch for your team? Sorting out admin stuff for most of your first year? Working in an area where the exit opps are much more limited?

    Advantages/ disadvantages to both.

    eh? Shows how much you know about S&T (and before you say I know nothing about IBD, I have tasted it enough work life balance wise). Frankly if you are any good in S&T, you will be developing trading models/pricing in your 1st year, write market commentaries/research, trade ideas, make money directly by trading or talk to clients dependant on which area you are in. Hardly just fetching coffee/luch eh? Just so you know, even seniors fetch coffee for the desk every now and then, its called teamwork. Admin is part of every analyst work.
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    (Original post by Teenage Pirate)
    Yeah, I guess you can be sure that you want to be a trader for the rest of your life based on your 2.5 months of "work" over the summer.
    I can certainly rule out throwing my life away as I would in ibd. I've seen the people who work there, the smart ones want out and into s&t, the others are lost cases.
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    (Original post by derivstrader)
    IBD and Trading will attract different people based on their levels of risk aversion.
    http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show....php?t=1460261

    Preach!

    Bankers are Pussies, Traders are MEN!!!
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    Different bourses for different horses... dont argue which is best unless for amusement.
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    oh and @OP, like the list. GJ.
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    (Original post by Neocortex)
    eh? Shows how much you know about S&T (and before you say I know nothing about IBD, I have tasted it enough work life balance wise). Frankly if you are any good in S&T, you will be developing trading models/pricing in your 1st year, write market commentaries/research, trade ideas, make money directly by trading or talk to clients dependant on which area you are in. Hardly just fetching coffee/luch eh? Just so you know, even seniors fetch coffee for the desk every now and then, its called teamwork. Admin is part of every analyst work.
    Your argument is like an IBD analyst talking about their "CEO level contact in year 1" and "how they managed to get $texas more for the sale of their client"

    Yes of course you do work in S&T, you just don't do serious work or not nearly as much as in IBD.
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    (Original post by DerPumuckl)
    I can certainly rule out throwing my life away as I would in ibd. I've seen the people who work there, the smart ones want out and into s&t, the others are lost cases.
    Let me guess, "the people" = the people you met at your firmwide intern networking event
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    PS: Not saying IBD is better than S&T, it's a matter of preferences, but people whose experience in banking is limited to a summer internship where they haven't done real work really shouldn't be commenting on the area they didn't even intern in.
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    (Original post by Teenage Pirate)
    Your argument is like an IBD analyst talking about their "CEO level contact in year 1" and "how they managed to get $texas more for the sale of their client"

    Yes of course you do work in S&T, you just don't do serious work or not nearly as much as in IBD.
    Both first years on the desk I interned at were trading within the first 10 months of being on the desk (equity derivs). You do need to prove yourself and its up to you how fast you earn a book/responsibility. Up until that point though your key focus is on learning, you dont just walk in and start trading derivs day 1. IBD you can start doing what you call 'serious work' earlier because it doesn't take as much brainpower to make sure the pitchbook's comma to parentheses ratio is just the way the MD likes it.

    I agree with you that its a matter of personality and skills.
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    Haven't read it, but being able to sort the work to be done into something you can pass off to support and something you have to do yourself should be there.
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    (Original post by Teenage Pirate)
    Your argument is like an IBD analyst talking about their "CEO level contact in year 1" and "how they managed to get $texas more for the sale of their client"

    Yes of course you do work in S&T, you just don't do serious work or not nearly as much as in IBD.
    With all due respect my original statement reads "reminds me why I feel lucky to be in S&T." It is my preference that I prefer S&T and you don't need to come back to me that all we do is fetch coffee.

    Rather than making childish comments and assume I haven't interned in IBD why don't you come visit the trading floor and try it out eh? I have been and done M&A work and also seen my best friend suffer in that kind of environment for way too long.

    If losing/making money is not serious for you in S&T then I don't know what it is or writing market commentaries that are read by hundreds of investors/hedge funds. This does happen even during rotation/early stage of your career if you are any good. Of course you will not do much serious work if all you do is show little interest and not prepared to up your game in here....duh
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    (Original post by Teenage Pirate)
    You S&T guys like fetching coffee/ lunch for your team? Sorting out admin stuff for most of your first year? Working in an area where the exit opps are much more limited?

    Advantages/ disadvantages to both.
    I'd prefer to work in S&T, where my brain will actually be used.
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    (Original post by Neocortex)
    With all due respect my original statement reads "reminds me why I feel lucky to be in S&T." It is my preference that I prefer S&T and you don't need to come back to me that all we do is fetch coffee.

    Rather than making childish comments and assume I haven't interned in IBD why don't you come visit the trading floor and try it out eh? I have been and done M&A work and also seen my best friend suffer in that kind of environment for way too long.

    If losing/making money is not serious for you in S&T then I don't know what it is or writing market commentaries that are read by hundreds of investors/hedge funds. This does happen even during rotation/early stage of your career if you are any good. Of course you will not do much serious work if all you do is show little interest and not prepared to up your game in here....duh
    So, do you trade a proper book yet? Derivstrader said "within 10 months" - 10 months is a long time. Your market commentaries - the same things interns within IBD do?

    My point would be that while you do a lot of mundane **** in IBD, in S&T it takes a long time for you to actually start doing S&T work as opposed to being a glorified trading assistant.

    My point about the difference in level of responsibility between the two for the first year or so should be valid...
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    (Original post by Zürich)
    I'd prefer to work in S&T, where my brain will actually be used.
    Having spent a lot of time interning in IBD, I've become good at coming up with ways to save brainpower/time. While I haven't been in a similar situation, in your case, I'd recommend you email yourself the team's coffee order - that should save you from having to use your brain too much at the Starbucks/Costa/whatever your firm has. Then you'll have more time to read Dealbreaker and ask the more senior traders stupid questions!
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    (Original post by Zürich)
    I'd prefer to work in S&T, where my brain will actually be used.
    Yep, IBD is for numbskulls. Traders are intrinsically intellectually superior.
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    I seriously dont understand why people think IBD is just about doing pitch-books and comps.

    I just gave you a whole list of things that are required from IBD analysts and since you guys are top class analysts in S&T I would ask you to provides a similar list here outlining what is required from first and second year analysts in S&T
 
 
 
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