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Is it right for my teacher to predict me a B considering i got a B in AS? Watch

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    Yes. That's standard procedure in my college. Unless you had some special circumstances or were 3% from the grade up.
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    (Original post by morecambebay)
    If you wanted an A, you should have got an A. Why should you be predicted the same as people who didnt **** up? It kind of makes predictions pointless if everybody is given A's anyway.
    Getting a 'B' is hardly a '**** up'

    and also, most people (certainly in my school) do much better in A2 despite all you might say about it being more difficult than AS.
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      (Original post by W.H.T)
      Getting a 'B' is hardly a '**** up'

      and also, most people (certainly in my school) do much better in A2 despite all you might say about it being more difficult than AS.
      It is if you are aiming for an A.
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      (Original post by W.H.T)
      Getting a 'B' is hardly a '**** up'

      and also, most people (certainly in my school) do much better in A2 despite all you might say about it being more difficult than AS.
      Same. People tend to do better in A2 than AS because they've come to understand the work-load, well, that's the case in my school.
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      (Original post by TheSownRose)
      That makes very little sense.
      I think they meant that if you get overpredicted then fail to get the grades, you'll just get 6 rejections from great unis rather than X offers from good ones.
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      Yes its totally fair. At my school there are people who got Cs in their AS getting predicted the same as me when i got As! I wish the predictions at my school were as fair as they are at yours.
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      (Original post by TheSownRose)
      That makes very little sense.
      What I mean is that if someone is predicted A's and so applies to unis that require A's he/she will get some conditional offers ,basically requiring A grades.
      If he /she then gets B's or C's because their predicted grades were too high, the high predicted grades haven't done them any good at all.
      The high predicted grades have just encouraged someone to apply to places he/she hasn't got a chance of getting into.
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      (Original post by foreignersuite)
      Right,

      So my history teacher has to give me a predticed grade for government and politcs due to my politics teacher leaving the college. I now have a new politics teacher, but she doesnt know my capability.

      I feel that I can get an A.

      In the units for AS I got an A and a D which overall was a B.

      I'm going to be retaking the D and hopefully get an A overall.

      But to be still predicted a B is upsetting.

      Any advice guys?
      a B at AS and you think A2 youre gunna do better? are you dumb? a2 is made harder than as
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      (Original post by History-Student)
      I think they meant that if you get overpredicted then fail to get the grades, you'll just get 6 rejections from great unis rather than X offers from good ones.
      Even so, that still makes no sense. For a start, you only apply to five unis, but I'll assume that was a typo.

      Most people get offers before they get the grades, so they'll stilll get offers if they have predicted grades they'll later fail to achieve. For example, predicted AAA - they might still get all five back as offers.

      Even when they do fail to get those grades, they may or may not fail to get into uni. For the purpose of discussion, eliminate the possibility of being accepted even if you do miss. Imagine they got BBB; if their firm offer was AAA and their insurance ABB, they won't get into their unis.

      However, if they have an AAB firm and an BBB insurance, they'll still get into one of their chosen unis. So, it all comes down to what offers they're holding as to whether they'll get in, not if they're over-predicted/
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      (Original post by TheSownRose)
      Even so, that still makes no sense. For a start, you only apply to five unis, but I'll assume that was a typo.
      Really? Huh, I'm sure I remember doing 6...
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      For geography I've been predicted an A and I got an A next year (but then again I don't think I did well enough to be able to get an A*) and then in history I'm predicted a B and I got a B last year and got an A in one exam and a C in the other. I think I'll might do better in history this year but thats because there is coursework and the exam works differently which I think might suit me better. Also on my UCAS form it says for Archaeology i'm predicted an A however on my report it says I might be able to get an A*. It's just the way it goes. As long as it doesn't affect your uni choices it'll be fine. Just prove them wrong when you get your results.
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      (Original post by Doubledog)
      What I mean is that if someone is predicted A's and so applies to unis that require A's he/she will get some conditional offers ,basically requiring A grades.
      If he /she then gets B's or C's because their predicted grades were too high, the high predicted grades haven't done them any good at all.
      The high predicted grades have just encouraged someone to apply to places he/she hasn't got a chance of getting into.
      But as I explained to History-Student, it's unlikely that even some predicted AAA would just apply to AAA unis; they'd also apply to some lower ones for insurance, so if they had a BBB insurance and got BBB grades, they'd still get in.
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      (Original post by History-Student)
      Really? Huh, I'm sure I remember doing 6...
      When did you apply? I used to be 6 a couple of years ago and now its changed.
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      (Original post by History-Student)
      Really? Huh, I'm sure I remember doing 6...
      It used to be, but they changed it for 2008 entry, I believe.
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      (Original post by TheSownRose)
      Even so, that still makes no sense. For a start, you only apply to five unis, but I'll assume that was a typo.

      Most people get offers before they get the grades, so they'll stilll get offers if they have predicted grades they'll later fail to achieve. For example, predicted AAA - they might still get all five back as offers.

      Even when they do fail to get those grades, they may or may not fail to get into uni. For the purpose of discussion, eliminate the possibility of being accepted even if you do miss. Imagine they got BBB; if their firm offer was AAA and their insurance ABB, they won't get into their unis.

      However, if they have an AAB firm and an BBB insurance, they'll still get into one of their chosen unis. So, it all comes down to what offers they're holding as to whether they'll get in, not if they're over-predicted/
      Sigh you just complicated things, he is hoping to get predicted A's because he wants to go to a top uni. Only being predicted an A will acheive this. Otherwise he won't even get the offer, but when he does underacheive as was actually expected he will be rejected from and unis he was hoping to get into to. Though I still agree with you opinion that one insurance offer is all he needs to stay safe.
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      (Original post by TheSownRose)
      But as I explained to History-Student, it's unlikely that even some predicted AAA would just apply to AAA unis; they'd also apply to some lower ones for insurance, so if they had a BBB insurance and got BBB grades, they'd still get in.
      I understand your point.
      I'm not sure how far under their predicted grades the 55% who are overpredicted fall. It could be more than one grade, but if anyone knows this info maybe they could post it here.
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      (Original post by TheSownRose)
      That makes very little sense.
      It makes perfect sense - they may give you an offer based on the predicted grades, but if the grades are overpredicted then you won't actually get the grades and won't get in...
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      (Original post by lizlaz350)
      It makes perfect sense - they may give you an offer based on the predicted grades, but if the grades are overpredicted then you won't actually get the grades and won't get in...
      But it still doesn't mean that being overpredicted will result in you getting no offers. Unis are fully believing you'll achieve those grades, they're not to know that you'll later go on to fail.

      And they're unlikely to have applied to just top unis, so depending on what their insurance is, they may still get into a uni they applied to.
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      If you got a D in a module, a B prediction seems fair to me. Just prove her wrong. You can discuss your determination etc. on your personal statement, if you feel that it's likely to disadvantage you any.
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      (Original post by TheSownRose)
      But it still doesn't mean that being overpredicted will result in you getting no offers. Unis are fully believing you'll achieve those grades, they're not to know that you'll later go on to fail.
      Yes, you might get offers, but the original post said you 'won't get into' not 'won't get offers'.
      You might get an offer but that doesn't guarantee you a place if you don't get the grades.

      I also went back and read what you said about having lower down universities as insurance and considering the OP said that his 'life counts on this predicted grade', this suggests that lower down universities aren't on the cards for him, meaning he still probably won't get in.
     
     
     
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