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Nationwide protests against tax avoiders - 4 Dec 2010 Watch

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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Avoiding tax is not "taking resources". It is simply refusing to give your hard earned money to the lazy and feckless underclass.
    What like schools and hospitals . Pay taxes or dont live here imo, whoever you are.
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    (Original post by Duncan Idaho)
    have you lost your moral compass quady.

    It is morally indefensible to dodge tax
    Oh really? When Tax is immorally high, it is completely justified to avoid said tax. Would you rather collect NO tax revenue from the rich at all when they move out of the country? Leaving Britain to fester with no sizeable revenue from anybody but the middle class, who are squeezed enough as it is.

    For evidence, see the revenues from the highest tax band [50%] when it was implemented. It was LESS than that when it was at 40%.
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    (Original post by Duncan Idaho)
    just because you're rich doesn't mean you have the right to dodge tax
    Step 6, an equal income tax threshold for everyone.
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    (Original post by Quady)
    So you are surely for that one right?
    yes I am in favour of stopping gov agreed tax breaks for big corporations
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    Big businesses spend millions a year on hiring professionals to help them with this sort of thing. There has to be a point where the tax rate is set at such a level where it makes no financial sense to continue paying these people to help them evade taxes, and the overall tax haul will increase and the system will provide a stimulatory environment for business helping the wider economy.
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    (Original post by Tashalls)
    What like schools and hospitals . Pay taxes or dont live here imo, whoever you are.
    Nobody is saying don't pay ANY tax, it is just that taxes are far too high. People who earn £150,000 a year are not, by any stretch of the imagination, rich. They're hardly oligarchs and movie stars living in multi-million pound mansions in Chelsea smoking cuban cigars and quaffing Louis Roederer like it's going out of fashion. They're doctors, analysts, lawyers, business owners. Can it really be justifiable that someone who has actually worked hard and been successful in life sees more of their earnings go to the state than into their own bank account?

    I wouldn't mind paying 30% income tax. Hell, even 40% wouldn't be horrible. But 50%? Ridiculous.

    You can't blame people for wanting to be tax-efficient (whilst being 100% HMRC & IR compliant).
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Tax avoidance is completely acceptable and legal.

    Tax evasion is illegal (though it seems perfectly acceptable to me).
    What do you think makes tax evasion acceptable?
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Nobody is saying don't pay ANY tax, it is just that taxes are far too high. People who earn £150,000 a year are not, by any stretch of the imagination, rich. They're hardly oligarchs and movie stars living in multi-million pound mansions in Chelsea smoking cuban cigars and quaffing Louis Roederer like it's going out of fashion. They're doctors, analysts, lawyers, business owners. Can it really be justifiable that someone who has actually worked hard and been successful in life sees more of their earnings go to the state than into their own bank account?

    I wouldn't mind paying 30% income tax. Hell, even 40% wouldn't be horrible. But 50%? Ridiculous.

    You can't blame people for wanting to be tax-efficient (whilst being 100% HMRC & IR compliant).
    Stating whether taxes are too low or too high is a subjective statement

    Observing what happens to tax revenues as tax rates change - and in particular observing which rate generates the highest tax revenues is not.

    HMRC does not have anywhere near the resources to take on the tax evaders. It's those that I'd deal with first as a priority - on the grounds that tax evasion is a criminal offence. http://www.fda.org.uk/Media/HMRC-nee...on-leader.aspx
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    What do you think makes tax evasion acceptable?
    People have worked for their money.

    Why should they have to give it to the state to spend it on things that they do not agree with?

    I have nothing against taxation that funds public infrastructure, education or healthcare. But to give free money to people who do not (for whatever reason) earn their own is reprehensible.
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    (Original post by Prince Rhyus)
    Stating whether taxes are too low or too high is a subjective statement

    Observing what happens to tax revenues as tax rates change - and in particular observing which rate generates the highest tax revenues is not.

    People aren't going to look at charts and graphs to decide whether or not they feel overtaxed. If they feel they are being taxed too highly, they will leave. Plenty of other nations want (and appropriately reward) those who work hard and have exceptional skills.

    HMRC does not have anywhere near the resources to take on the tax evaders.
    It's those that I'd deal with first as a priority - on the grounds that tax evasion is a criminal offence. http://www.fda.org.uk/Media/HMRC-nee...on-leader.aspx
    Let's hope it stays that way.
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    I'm pretty surer tax evasion wouldn't be an issue if people thought the level of tax was justifiable.

    50% tax however is daylight robbery.
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    (Original post by Keckers)
    50% tax however is daylight robbery.
    It isn't if we recived Scandanavian style welfare - free university education, higher levels of healthcare investment and so on. Yet it's all a bit embaraasing when we pay such huge taxes 'and' are, for example, introducing the most expensive public university system in the entire developed world.
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    (Original post by crazylemon)
    Tax avoidance is nothing wrong. It is the legal right of every Englishman to reduce his tax bill as possible.
    I wouldn't voluntarily ever hand money over to the tax man unnecessarily.

    Tax evasion is an issue. Though I blame this more on the way tax is collected. It should however be stopped.
    They talk of people on benefits as scum.

    Though they are the ones taking the liberties handed to them by the society they exist in, built on the backs of those requiring benfits (Not talking about the scroungers, but those who have have genuine hardship and those who have worked but are no longer able to - or those who simply don't earn a viable wage to live indepependent of the state) to get by.

    The rich, obscence, vile types who participate in the effort of evading and avoiding tax are the real scum, because they own castles built on the true foundations of our society proportionately parasitically to the much less "well off".
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    People have worked for their money.

    Why should they have to give it to the state to spend it on things that they do not agree with?

    I have nothing against taxation that funds public infrastructure, education or healthcare. But to give free money to people who do not (for whatever reason) earn their own is reprehensible.
    If we expanded that principle, we'd end up with either:
    - A fiendishly complicated tax system that makes the current one look straight forward
    - A system where people make "voluntary" contributions which would give us a modern-day version of the late Victorian era where charities will inevitably be underfunded vis-a-vis the problems that they individually are trying to deal with. (As an aside, there is a huge "opportunity" for consolidation within the charities sector - they could save a fortune in administration, marketing and campaigning by a series of strategic mergers).

    In terms of giving away "free money" - i.e. benefits, it's 'cart and horse' stuff. The issue there is disagreement with the policy, not the issue of tax collection.

    Imperfect as a democracy might be, elections provide an indication of what society views is and is not acceptable. I think much more can be done to engage people with how the society functions and what its values should be - whether we are talking about national laws to issues in people's local neighbourhoods.

    There are things that the current Government are doing that I disagree with. However, I'm not questionning its legitimacy. Where I disagree with something, I take legitimate action - e.g. campaigning (in my case through my trade union as my political options are constitutionally limited.)

    What I don't do is I don't drive a steamroller through the law.
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    (Original post by Tashalls)
    What like schools and hospitals . Pay taxes or dont live here imo, whoever you are.
    In a nutshell ^^^

    Paying taxes is a civic duty, and no amount of "charideee" is going to change that.

    If everyone acted in such a manner, tax rates are far more likely to fall for everyone.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    I wouldn't mind paying 30% income tax. Hell, even 40% wouldn't be horrible. But 50%? Ridiculous.
    But people on 150k don't pay 50% of their income to the taxman...
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    (Original post by Duncan Idaho)
    yes I am in favour of stopping gov agreed tax breaks for big corporations
    But against it for individuals?

    And that means you're against businesses being able to offset input VAT against output VAT right?
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    End tax avoidance LOL EVEN THOUGH I'M 17 AND ONLY HEARD THIS TERM FOR THE FIRST TIME LAST WEEK it sounds BAd LET'S PROTESTLOLOLOl olo l CON-DEM GOVT LOLOLO
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    It legal and acceptable

    I wonder will the rioters take into consideration how many jobs are made available as a result.
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    (Original post by Aspiringlawstudent)
    Nobody is saying don't pay ANY tax, it is just that taxes are far too high. People who earn £150,000 a year are not, by any stretch of the imagination, rich. They're hardly oligarchs and movie stars living in multi-million pound mansions in Chelsea smoking cuban cigars and quaffing Louis Roederer like it's going out of fashion. They're doctors, analysts, lawyers, business owners. Can it really be justifiable that someone who has actually worked hard and been successful in life sees more of their earnings go to the state than into their own bank account?

    I wouldn't mind paying 30% income tax. Hell, even 40% wouldn't be horrible. But 50%? Ridiculous.

    You can't blame people for wanting to be tax-efficient (whilst being 100% HMRC & IR compliant).
    £75 a year is more then anyone needs, most people dream of that amount of money including people who work extremly hard and imo that's rich.
 
 
 
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