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    The best options are the subjects that you are most interested in.
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    (Original post by SPMS)
    Your friend is doing Further Maths to A level without Maths? If this is so you are a better candidate in terms of subjects instantly.

    Interesting, I believe if you write a really strong personal statement that shows you do humanitarian activites eg. writing artciles for newspapers etc. then this would level things up depending on i) the quality of humanitarian EC's you have ii) How good your PS is compared to his? Also, some Universities are more bothered over it than others.
    Sorry, he is doing Maths and Further Maths.
    Please elaborate on humanitarian activities?
    And what about volunteering, is there any need for this?

    My friend is a good chess player, performing well in regional heats/games, however, I have done a variety of things, such as martial arts, cricket, duke of edinburgh, volunteering for a charity, and work experience in an office. I'm in the process of getting work experience in a large accountancy firm...
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    If I was 16 again and choosing my AS Levels i'd go for:

    Maths, Chemistry, Physics, English and German.
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    My friend got into Cambridge for Economics with Maths, Further Maths, Physics, Chemistry and English Literature (at AS anyway).
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    (Original post by DonFahad)
    Sorry, he is doing Maths and Further Maths.
    Please elaborate on humanitarian activities?
    And what about volunteering, is there any need for this?

    My friend is a good chess player, performing well in regional heats/games, however, I have done a variety of things, such as martial arts, cricket, duke of edinburgh, volunteering for a charity, and work experience in an office. I'm in the process of getting work experience in a large accountancy firm...
    Anything that involves writing, research etc.
    Depends on the quality of volunteering, if it is just at your local charity shop then I would say no, however if you are in charge of organsing some big charity fund raising event then yes. Regards to volunteering/work experience when writing a PS it is very much so quality over quantity.
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    apparantly universities look first at maths (including further, obviously), then sciences, then languages, then i assume english/history etc, so maybe do a language? depends what you want to do at university
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    (Original post by DonFahad)
    Sorry, he is doing Maths and Further Maths.
    Please elaborate on humanitarian activities?
    And what about volunteering, is there any need for this?

    My friend is a good chess player, performing well in regional heats/games, however, I have done a variety of things, such as martial arts, cricket, duke of edinburgh, volunteering for a charity, and work experience in an office. I'm in the process of getting work experience in a large accountancy firm...
    You can only write so much in your personal statement. You'll only need one or two things to write about to demonstrate what you have learnt, and what skills you have developed.

    Volunteering shows you're a nice person, but unless you are going to link it to Economics there is no point in doing/including it.

    You've got enough going for you imho even without experience at the large firm. Doesn't matter if you made coffee and did some stapling or organised a large group of people to help out with some thingy that happened last month. Any work experience mentioned in your personal statement is what you make it out to be. Obviously it is more effort to make something interesting up or waffle if you did nothing all week, and it would be nice to actually gain something from work experience. But really, you can just as easily say something subjective (or "extend the truth") and relate it to Economics and your wish to read Economics at uni.

    SPMS tried to say work experience was for the most part irrelevant to Economics in another thread. I highly disagree. I think it's fairly easy to link most things to Economics.
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    (Original post by Chelle-belle)
    You can only write so much in your personal statement. You'll only need one or two things to write about to demonstrate what you have learnt, and what skills you have developed.

    Volunteering shows you're a nice person, but unless you are going to link it to Economics there is no point in doing/including it.

    You've got enough going for you imho even without experience at the large firm. Doesn't matter if you made coffee and did some stapling or organised a large group of people to help out with some thingy that happened last month. Any work experience mentioned in your personal statement is what you make it out to be. Obviously it is more effort to make something interesting up or waffle if you did nothing all week, and it would be nice to actually gain something from work experience. But really, you can just as easily say something subjective (or "extend the truth") and relate it to Economics and your wish to read Economics at uni.

    SPMS tried to say work experience was for the most part irrelevant to Economics in another thread. I highly disagree. I think it's fairly easy to link most things to Economics.
    Ive seen that interchange between the two of you. Im in the middle of you two - I think Economics can be related to almost anything, but its irrelevant if it is only a weak link; you aren't going to write about how your advanced knowledge of the office water-cooler has led you to realise the economic impact of unnecessary water by the western world... However, I can't see the harm in reporting that you fronted a large fundraising campaign, or spent time in a Big4 firm, because both of those things are directly related to a degree in Economics.

    As luck has it, I am actually going to be fronting, or promoting (I'm probably the 5th/6th most important person involved, considering that there are 10 trustees, and around 20-30 other individuals involved too, and that I'm only 17, its a big deal for me haha) a large fund-raising campaign for a new cultural centre, and I think I mentioned that I am sending through an application for work experience to KPMG and RSM Tenon (and hopefully taking my gap year with Deloitte).

    As far as I know, and from what I've been told, there's 3 things for me to do now;
    -Get the grades.
    -Read and develop knowledge of economics
    -pwn the personal statement
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    (Original post by DonFahad)
    Ive seen that interchange between the two of you. Im in the middle of you two - I think Economics can be related to almost anything, but its irrelevant if it is only a weak link; you aren't going to write about how your advanced knowledge of the office water-cooler has led you to realise the economic impact of unnecessary water by the western world... However, I can't see the harm in reporting that you fronted a large fundraising campaign, or spent time in a Big4 firm, because both of those things are directly related to a degree in Economics.

    As luck has it, I am actually going to be fronting, or promoting (I'm probably the 5th/6th most important person involved, considering that there are 10 trustees, and around 20-30 other individuals involved too, and that I'm only 17, its a big deal for me haha) a large fund-raising campaign for a new cultural centre, and I think I mentioned that I am sending through an application for work experience to KPMG and RSM Tenon (and hopefully taking my gap year with Deloitte).

    As far as I know, and from what I've been told, there's 3 things for me to do now;
    -Get the grades.
    -Read and develop knowledge of economics
    -pwn the personal statement
    Hahah yeah, my point is that you don't mention the water cooler. You make something up or you state its relevance to the world or the economy (and then go on about Economics.)

    The office has improved your communication skills via reading/writing reports, enhanced your ability to make (economic) decisions, heightened your appreciation of precision/accuracy/punctuality in the workplace; and then relate this to why it might make you a good candidate or how it has encouraged you to study Economics.

    I agree I'm probably not being very moral but there is always something to say and you can always elaborate and bring it back to Economics.

    Maybe you just want briefly mention how much paper wastage and inefficiency you saw whilst you were there - so you can relate it to an article or book you read on this, or to a larger scale, or to an economic concept you find interesting.

    PS I hope you do find your work experience really fun.
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    (Original post by Chelle-belle)
    Hahah yeah, my point is that you don't mention the water cooler. You make something up or you state its relevance to the world or the economy (and then go on about Economics.)

    The office has improved your communication skills via reading/writing reports, enhanced your ability to make (economic) decisions, heightened your appreciation of precision/accuracy/punctuality in the workplace; and then relate this to why it might make you a good candidate or how it has encouraged you to study Economics.

    I agree I'm probably not being very moral but there is always something to say and you can always elaborate and bring it back to Economics.

    Maybe you just want briefly mention how much paper wastage and inefficiency you saw whilst you were there - so you can relate it to an article or book you read on this, or to a larger scale, or to an economic concept you find interesting.

    PS I hope you do find your work experience really fun.
    Isn't paper wastage and inefficiency the kind of weak point you DON'T want to make? *I re-read your comments, and yes, perhaps, at a stretch, mention it after a point you've read in a book - but use it as a small afterthought, a little post-script comment kind of thing, rather than a leading point.

    However, I definitely agree about communication skills, and the importance of working to a deadline. Obviously, in my PS, if i mention it, I will choose the most ridiculously excessive vocabulary to describe this, but it is actually genuine in my case. I worked in an office every night after school for 3 weeks, and it being a small office (4-5 of us in a large, open room), I could see everything that was going on. The guy in charge had such ridiculously good people skills, and he got his deals sorted that way. Very astute. He saw through people straight away, and by the end of my time there, he was teaching me his methods. Tiny little things that you get told (ie body language, facial expressions, choice of words), but never actually remember to use in these situations. Almost a bit like game theory...

    I doubt I'll enjoy the work experience if I'm put into a taxation department, but maybe more if I'm put into auditing (apparently its more open, there are less deadlines and its slightly more enjoyable). Consultancy is definitely the one I want though...

    I've seen on your interests that you have Economics as your first (and main?) interest; d'you mind me asking what stage of your career you're at? You seem to know a lot (from experience?)
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    (Original post by Chelle-belle)
    Hahah yeah, my point is that you don't mention the water cooler. You make something up or you state its relevance to the world or the economy (and then go on about Economics.)

    The office has improved your communication skills via reading/writing reports, enhanced your ability to make (economic) decisions, heightened your appreciation of precision/accuracy/punctuality in the workplace; and then relate this to why it might make you a good candidate or how it has encouraged you to study Economics.

    I agree I'm probably not being very moral but there is always something to say and you can always elaborate and bring it back to Economics.

    Maybe you just want briefly mention how much paper wastage and inefficiency you saw whilst you were there - so you can relate it to an article or book you read on this, or to a larger scale, or to an economic concept you find interesting.

    PS I hope you do find your work experience really fun.
    Work experience unless it is with a Economist will not improve your economic ability.

    It might improve how you can do an Economics Degree, it can improve your social skills in this case if the university wants to see you are capable of doing the degree it can benefit this. It won't convince them on your ability of economics however. Best to do the big 4 work experience but just refer to how it can help you organise time be more sociable etc. don't go into theories about rubbish, literally.

    Please don't mention anything about paper wastage in your personal statement lol.

    You show your economic ability by books you have read etc. public lectures you have attended, summer schools, discuss a topic you like in a book or something then argue against it and for it concisely, that is what I advise.
    i) You are original. Most students go yeah, I really like this book especially the bit about .... - Boring.
    ii) You show extremely high aptitudes of Economics if you can argue against an economist's theory and argue it well. - other students struggle to prove why they are good at economics other than their grade and that they really do read around economics.
    iii) Shows you can argue and skills that then you don't need to prove have been done, especially the humanitarian skill - this would work perfectly. - proves analytical, writing, arguments etc. others simply demonstrate that they can copy and paste in essence.
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    (Original post by DonFahad)
    Isn't paper wastage and inefficiency the kind of weak point you DON'T want to make? *I re-read your comments, and yes, perhaps, at a stretch, mention it after a point you've read in a book - but use it as a small afterthought, a little post-script comment kind of thing, rather than a leading point.

    However, I definitely agree about communication skills, and the importance of working to a deadline. Obviously, in my PS, if i mention it, I will choose the most ridiculously excessive vocabulary to describe this, but it is actually genuine in my case. I worked in an office every night after school for 3 weeks, and it being a small office (4-5 of us in a large, open room), I could see everything that was going on. The guy in charge had such ridiculously good people skills, and he got his deals sorted that way. Very astute. He saw through people straight away, and by the end of my time there, he was teaching me his methods. Tiny little things that you get told (ie body language, facial expressions, choice of words), but never actually remember to use in these situations. Almost a bit like game theory...

    I doubt I'll enjoy the work experience if I'm put into a taxation department, but maybe more if I'm put into auditing (apparently its more open, there are less deadlines and its slightly more enjoyable). Consultancy is definitely the one I want though...

    I've seen on your interests that you have Economics as your first (and main?) interest; d'you mind me asking what stage of your career you're at? You seem to know a lot (from experience?)
    Eh, it's a weak point if you mention it poorly. The Economist actually did have a really good article on it a while ago believe it or not, and it did make a lot of sense. There's no reason why you shouldn't mention this if you can relate it to economic theory (easily done.) Why shouldn't you mention how you noticed how difficult it was for a small firm to thrive in today's economic climate, and why they are at a disadvantage because they can't take advantage of economies of scale or expensive technologies (hence possible paper wastage depending on context), and expand and critically analyse and move on, if this is your area of interest?

    Also, you were probably kidding about the excessive vocabulary but if you can put it simply, do that; don't make it fancy and/or difficult to read x]

    Unfortunately what stage I am at in my life or what experience I actually hold does not aide my credibility; but I can think, and I can write and I know how to make the best of what I am given. Not quite sure why you think I know a lot but it's flattering

    The order of my interests does not really reflect how much I love the topic at hand; but I do really enjoy the subject for what it is. It's more that learning about Economics has helped me really form opinions on important issues to me like poverty and education, and it helps me understand (just that little bit more) why things are so, and maybe how things could be better etc.

    Thinking critically without excluding any secondary or tertiary effects of a decision is really engaging and that is what I find fun. I could go on, but I basically aim to be a teacher within a few years; studying Economics just helps me appreciate what a great decision that would be :yep: I probably just gave someone something to copy and paste into their personal statement by accident. Oh well. Anyway, happy to help if you need any; though I doubt this as you seem like a really bright person on your way to many accomplishments already


    I'm sure you'll enjoy work experience whether in the taxation or auditing departments simply because it'll be somewhat new. I doubt they will work you too hard (in reference to work experience, not gap year work! )


    Edit: To the last part of the above.... well, yeah, I don't really disagree with you. You can do it that way. Or you can do it this way. Most people mix the two since that seems sensible, but I mean if you want to throw away your work experience when it could potentially be beneficial, then go ahead.
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    First: Do the work experience, it will help you in the future also.
    Second: Use the work experience to show your personal side.
    Third: Don't use it represent you improving your Economic ability.
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    I would say Maths, FMaths, Economics and any other "respected" subject, i.e any science, history, english, geography etc.

    I would personally do the first 3 and then a science or an essay subject, but it really doesn't have to be.
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    Maths, Further Maths, Economics, History/Physics - I'd go for History
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    Thanks for all the responses, it has been a real insight to what would may be best.

    I wouldn't say doing Physics gives you more options - do that if you're interested in engineering or obviously physics itself, but that combination pretty much closes off doing any arts subjects at all.
    By keeping options open, I mean doing something Maths related at university - I don't intend to study an Arts subject. I thought Physics would be necessary if I wanted to do something like Maths? Am I wrong?

    What would you consider a top university for economics?
    Oxbridge, Warwick, UCL etc. Not forgetting the very respectable universites such as Bath as well.

    I just fear that if I take History, then I would not have such a great chance of applying to do Maths if I find Economics is not to my taste (although I doubt this).

    Would Maths, History, Economics and Physics be better for an Economics application - with FM done at AS? Or is FM much better as a full A Level?
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    In my experience, Maths, Further Maths and Physics would show a great grasp of mathematical problems, which is a must for Economics. I know several people going for Oxbridge who do this combination, and they all got interviews (fate as yet undecided, however).
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    Media Studies, Film Studies, General Studies, Key Skills.
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    (Original post by I Crashin I)
    Hey guys,

    I'm in Year 11 now, and have a real interest in studying at one of the top Universities for Economics. I've achieved 4 A*s in English, History, French and Music last year, so I have the belief that I can achieve this.

    However, I'm in a real dilemma! I'm unclear over what A-Levels I should take in order to have the best opportunity in doing this.

    I've come to the understanding that Maths, Further Maths, Economics, History and Physics are best suited?

    What combination would you suggest is best? My idea is Maths, FM, Economics and Physics, simply as it leaves more opportunities open.

    Thanks a lot!
    Economics, Further/Furhter A Maths/Physics, Business, History/English Lit or English Lang
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    (Original post by I Crashin I)
    Thanks for all the responses, it has been a real insight to what would may be best.



    By keeping options open, I mean doing something Maths related at university - I don't intend to study an Arts subject. I thought Physics would be necessary if I wanted to do something like Maths? Am I wrong?



    Oxbridge, Warwick, UCL etc. Not forgetting the very respectable universites such as Bath as well.

    I just fear that if I take History, then I would not have such a great chance of applying to do Maths if I find Economics is not to my taste (although I doubt this).

    Would Maths, History, Economics and Physics be better for an Economics application - with FM done at AS? Or is FM much better as a full A Level?
    Unfortunately, with 4A*s, getting into Warwick, UCL, and Oxbridge would be massively difficult. Economics is only very marginally less competitive than medicine, and 4A*s probably isn't enough for the big 5. You do have a good chance at St. Andrews, and Bath, and Bristol, and Durham, which are still very good universities.

    Edit: Just read that you did those subjects last year! depends on what your predicted grades are, but obviously, with 4A*s in the bag, you seem like a top candidate already.
 
 
 
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