Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

Desert island books- complete works of ONE writer. Watch

    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Jasper Fforde. He's not had that many published (seven, I believe), but I could reread his books multiple times and still find them funny / forget everything that happens between reads. That combined with Shakespeare and the Bible would definitely give me enough to read that by the time I finish, I've forgotten what happened in the first book
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by GooseAbby)
    You can actually request to take in another religious text or not have the Bible at all But it's probably just because the programme's really old
    That's good. I think I would swap it for The God Delusion or some such, then, if that would count :yep:

    I was making a general point about my disdain for why we just happen to believe in one religion over the many others, btw
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Harper Lee.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Proust's 'In Search of Lost Time'.

    As close to 'indefinite' as possible.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by mau5)
    Every available issue of 'Front'.
    I like your style sir, I love Front. Jessica Weekleynomnomnom.

    Its a tough call between Oscar Wilde and Hunter S. Thompson...both inspirational geniuses in my opinion, anyway
    • Offline

      2
      (Original post by Christien)
      Harper Lee.





      For me: Oscar Wilde. :coma: Perfection.
      Offline

      1
      ReputationRep:
      Tom Clancy. I am uncultured :mmm:
      Offline

      15
      ReputationRep:
      Montaigne, but if I could sneakily swap that for the Bible before leavin' and free up a slot, I'd take Seb Faulks with me too.
      • Offline

        2
        (Original post by Gabbycat_Almighty)
        Its a tough call between Oscar Wilde and Hunter S. Thompson...both inspirational geniuses in my opinion, anyway
        *froths at the mouth*

        You can be on my desert island with me.
        Offline

        0
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by ArcadiaHouse)






        It was a truly horrible joke, but I really feel like someone had to do it.


        Anyway, I'd probably go for Joyce (the eventual, inevitable insanity may help me better understand Finnegan's Wake) or Cormac McCarthy. :holmes:
        Offline

        12
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by hobnob)
        Why the preference for beluga whales? Wouldn't they be a bit hard to hold on to, due to their size?:confused:
        Just because I'm so charmed by the fact that Tolstoy's work weighs the same as one, and that they have such smiley faces.
        Offline

        18
        ReputationRep:
        I wonder whether the people suggesting Fyodor Dostoevsky have actually read, ignoring the issue of actually understanding them, most of his works? Nevertheless, because I cannot pick him now, I will say either Dickens or Zola.
        • PS Helper
        Offline

        12
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by evantej)
        I wonder whether the people suggesting Fyodor Dostoevsky have actually read, ignoring the issue of actually understanding them, most of his works? Nevertheless, because I cannot pick him now, I will say either Dickens or Zola.
        What's the problem? Surely if anything, the collected works of a writer you haven't read would keep you distracted for even longer because you'd have to read them all from scratch? Then again, I suppose if you do that, there's a risk of getting stranded on an island with crates full of books which you don't actually like, so maybe it wouldn't be such a bright idea after all...
        Offline

        18
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by hobnob)
        What's the problem? Surely if anything, the collected works of a writer you haven't read would keep you distracted for even longer because you'd have to read them all from scratch? Then again, I suppose if you do that, there's a risk of getting stranded on an island with crates full of books which you don't actually like, so maybe it wouldn't be such a bright idea after all...
        That was partly my point; I assumed most had not actually read more than a few of his works, thus they did not really understand him.
        • PS Helper
        Offline

        12
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by evantej)
        That was partly my point; I assumed most had not actually read more than a few of his works, thus they did not really understand him.
        Ah, but maybe they think this is the best way of getting to understand him...
        Offline

        1
        ReputationRep:
        You get the Bible and Shakespeare there?
        Can I have a loaded gun instead of a book please?
        • PS Helper
        Offline

        12
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by (:Becca(:)
        You get the Bible and Shakespeare there?
        Can I have a loaded gun instead of a book please?
        Nobody actually said you had to read them, though - you could use them as doorstops. Provided you went to the trouble of building a house first, of course...:p:
        • Thread Starter
        Offline

        2
        ReputationRep:
        Having read everyone else's and stolen their ideas I now think I might go for Tolstoy. But if only she'd written more material, it would be Charlie Bronte.

        (Original post by evantej)
        That was partly my point; I assumed most had not actually read more than a few of his works, thus they did not really understand him.
        ...Why would you assume that? Beware of being a literature snob.
        Offline

        2
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by j.alexanderh)
        Proust's 'In Search of Lost Time'.

        As close to 'indefinite' as possible.
        I'd take Proust too. Being stranded on a desert island seems like the only circumstance in which I'd manage to finish 'A la recherche'. Though I'd also include his short stories, essays (he has quite a few on art, reading and Ruskin and they're lovely!) and his letters.
        Offline

        18
        ReputationRep:
        (Original post by missygeorgia)
        [...] Why would you assume that? Beware of being a literature snob.
        Reading him outside of his aesthetic, historical, political and philosophical (all these fields merge in nineteenth-century Russia, thankfully) context means you are not really reading Dostoevsky. Some texts are more universal than others (I imagine The Devils is incomprehensible to those with no knowledge of Russia, whereas The Double could be enjoyed by pretty much by anyone), but there is a perverse insistence on the nature of Russian nationality that is almost all of his texts from the 1860s onwards, and if you do not understand that (i.e. the extratextual allusions) then a desert island and the rest of time is not going to help.

        It has nothing to do with snobbery.
       
       
       
    • See more of what you like on The Student Room

      You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

    • Poll
      Did TEF Bronze Award affect your UCAS choices?
    • See more of what you like on The Student Room

      You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

    • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

      Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

      Quick reply
      Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.