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    I would go Birmingham, Leeds, Sheffield. But I am biased becaused Birmingham is going to be my firm! But to be honest, they are all good, all Russell group, all Red brick etc. At the Law talk on the Birmingham open day, they said they do let in some people who miss their offers, but I don't know about the others sorry!
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    (Original post by INTJ)
    Oh, of course, sarcasm :rolleyes: That, "my friend", is the typical response made by people who have made a critical mistake and cannot admit to it. In terms of LSE being better for Law, well, the facts speak for themself; and, as far as LSE being 'better' than UCL overall, I have yet to see any evidence of this. Rankings, entry requirements for the most competitive courses, and subject rankings are similar at both. If anything, UCL can claim to be better than oxbridge for more subjects than the LSE (economics only, which actually rivals Oxbridge, rather than beating it). Anyway, as you can see people do not really agree with your stance either; the polls, employer reviews, public view and rankings would also contradict your view...so I think we are done here.
    In all fairness it was intended as sarcasm. Hence me bolding the response poster, inserting an emodicon, etc. Now I do believe LSE is the better law school, but was not intending for a debate between LSE vs. UCL. If you are, let me know. I'll be happy to participate. I just thought it was completely irrelevant to this thread. No idea why you are so defensive of UCL. You probably have a 5 paragraph essay combined here.
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    (Original post by adam0311)
    In all fairness it was intended as sarcasm. Hence me bolding the response poster, inserting an emodicon, etc. Now I do believe LSE is the better law school, but was not intending for a debate between LSE vs. UCL. If you are, let me know. I'll be happy to participate. I just thought it was completely irrelevant to this thread. No idea why you are so defensive of UCL. You probably have a 5 paragraph essay combined here.
    I was just rebutting your statement. I do not care if you think LSE is better, lol, it's just that your reasons for it being better were nonsense, as well as for Imperial. Also, I would happily debate the LSE being 'better' for Law. Not out of animosity, but just because I am very curious to know why you think the LSE is better for Law when UCL is higher ranked in every table, revered across the globe for it, and has better graduate prospects and student satisfaction. I'm just interested to know why you think, despite all this, that LSE is better for law.
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    (Original post by INTJ)
    I was just rebutting your statement. I do not care if you think LSE is better, lol, it's just that your reasons for it being better were nonsense, as well as for Imperial. Also, I would happily debate the LSE being 'better' for Law. Not out of animosity, but just because I am very curious to know why you think the LSE is better for Law when UCL is higher ranked in every table, revered across the globe for it, and has better graduate prospects and student satisfaction. I'm just interested to know why you think, despite all this, that LSE is better for law.
    Both are good law schools. I don't want to be negative towards UCL. Because they are very similar. I find from personal experience LSE has a slight edge. I'll list out my arguments, that way you can rebut easily...if you even care to. Keep in mind, these arguments are relative to me and why I would pick LSE over UCL. A lot probably isn't relative to you. But the "which is better?" is very subjective and depends on the person. To some UEA might be the better option.

    In no particular order, just what comes to mind:

    1. Library. You'll have access as a UCL student, but on limited hours.
    2. LSE has a significantly better reputation in the US. Nobody has heard of UCL in the US. Well strike that, one of my tutors went to UCL...so he has. Other than that, nothing. LSE also has stronger networking in the US.
    3. You'll probably see more UCL grads in UK firms, I give you that. But that is because LSE has a **** ton of international students and a lot will go back home to do law or IB. This leads me to make the conclusion in #5.
    4. Better m to f ratio at LSE. (not srs)
    5. The more international students at LSE for law allow for better networking in an international legal setting. Again only applicable if looking to go out of the UK.
    6. Alumni from LSE is killer, just look at all of the politicians.
    7. LSE vs. UCL is a really stupid debate if we're talking employment within the UK. Any top 10 uni will get you an interview for a TC, etc. It's just an issue of how you perform. Its like arguing oxford is better than cambridge for law or vice versa. It really doesn't matter. LSE and UCL are both interchangeable for spots 3 and 4.
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    (Original post by adam0311)
    Both are good law schools. I don't want to be negative towards UCL. Because they are very similar. I find from personal experience LSE has a slight edge. I'll list out my arguments, that way you can rebut easily...if you even care to. Keep in mind, these arguments are relative to me and why I would pick LSE over UCL. A lot probably isn't relative to you. But the "which is better?" is very subjective and depends on the person. To some UEA might be the better option.

    In no particular order, just what comes to mind:

    1. Library. You'll have access as a UCL student, but on limited hours.
    2. LSE has a significantly better reputation in the US. Nobody has heard of UCL in the US. Well strike that, one of my tutors went to UCL...so he has. Other than that, nothing. LSE also has stronger networking in the US.
    3. You'll probably see more UCL grads in UK firms, I give you that. But that is because LSE has a **** ton of international students and a lot will go back home to do law or IB. This leads me to make the conclusion in #5.
    4. Better m to f ratio at LSE. (not srs)
    5. The more international students at LSE for law allow for better networking in an international legal setting. Again only applicable if looking to go out of the UK.
    6. Alumni from LSE is killer, just look at all of the politicians.
    7. LSE vs. UCL is a really stupid debate if we're talking employment within the UK. Any top 10 uni will get you an interview for a TC, etc. It's just an issue of how you perform. Its like arguing oxford is better than cambridge for law or vice versa. It really doesn't matter. LSE and UCL are both interchangeable for spots 3 and 4.
    1. Agreed.
    2. Agree that LSE has the better US reputation (among employers only, though), but it's level everywhere else. Otherwise, only Oxford is really 'known' in the US, and sometimes St Andrews.
    3. The LSE does not have that many more international students than UCL. They both have REALLY high numbers. Granted, LSE has slightly more, but it's actually very close there.
    4. lolz.
    5. Look back to my point 3.
    6. This one is subjective. I agree LSE has the politicians, but UCL has people like Gandhi (who I'm pretty sure did Law, too) etc. Though, I'll give alumni to LSE.
    7. Generally speaking, Oxbridge, Imperial, UCL and LSE will have quite a few more prospects after graduation than even the rest of the 'top 10'. Those 5 snatch up most of the top jobs, usually.

    So, while I agree with a lot of that, I don't see it counteracting the fact that UCL is higher ranked in every ranking (combined with it's similarly high international student intake, graduate prospects, student satisfaction etc).
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    (Original post by INTJ)
    1. Agreed.
    2. Agree that LSE has the better US reputation (among employers only, though), but it's level everywhere else. Otherwise, only Oxford is really 'known' in the US, and sometimes St Andrews.
    3. The LSE does not have that many more international students than UCL. They both have REALLY high numbers. Granted, LSE has slightly more, but it's actually very close there.
    4. lolz.
    5. Look back to my point 3.
    6. This one is subjective. I agree LSE has the politicians, but UCL has people like Gandhi (who I'm pretty sure did Law, too) etc. Though, I'll give alumni to LSE.
    7. Generally speaking, Oxbridge, Imperial, UCL and LSE will have quite a few more prospects after graduation than even the rest of the 'top 10'. Those 5 snatch up most of the top jobs, usually.

    So, while I agree with a lot of that, I don't see it counteracting the fact that UCL is higher ranked in every ranking (combined with it's similarly high international student intake, graduate prospects, student satisfaction etc).
    I think we agree enough to call it a day. :tee:
 
 
 
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