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Do you think politics should be made a compulsory subject in secondary education? Watch

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      (Original post by Planar)
      Out of three people I asked in my year, only one knew when WWII began and ended. If we're talking about general ignorance.
      :rofl: What a poor sample size.
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      PSHE?
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      Kids don't give a hoot about Politics. And neither does anyone else...
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      Yes and at the end of the course, the score you get determines whether you get the vote or not! Because at the moment everyone is allowed the vote, and if everybodys is allowed 1 vote then i should get 100!
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      (Original post by Hooj)
      Kids don't give a hoot about Politics. And neither does anyone else...
      Well I give a hoot!
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      Yes. Or a compulsory GCSE, muhahahaha!
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      That's a good question actually...

      I personally wouldn't mind it. Some people don't have a clue about politics and definitely need educating. Would it work if it was compulsory? Probably not- I don't see every student taking it seriously.
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      Definitely, I wish I'd been taught about politics rather than having to learn about it from the internet (and filtering through all the bias in the process).
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      No, Social Etiquette should.
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      Yes, replace PSE, General Studies, and hopefully AQA Anthology study.
      I'd prefer it anyway.
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      Boooring, so no.
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      When I was that age we had to do P.S.E - surely politics should come under the 'social' aspect?
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      (Original post by im so academic)
      :rofl: What a poor sample size.
      Lol can't argue with that
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      In secondary school we had to do a lesson called Citizenship once a week (not sure if anyone else did this?) where we learnt random stuff about drugs, sex education, etc. I think it would be good to incorporate politics into this. They could just do one term of it a year, but at least it would give people a more basic understanding. I don't think it should be compulsory to do a GSCE or similar in it, but schools should provide even a few lessons of how our country works. The last election was the first time I was old enough to vote and I had no idea what I was doing, so it would have been nice to have been taught it in school.
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      Yeah good idea lets teach everyone how to successfully claim expenses too:facepalm:
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      not gona happen the main parties rely on ignorance to gain votes
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      (Original post by milkytea)
      Not ideology, but basic politics and economics. People need to know how the system works. I asked my parents about this and they said it used to be an O level subject called Civics.

      When I went with my mum to vote in May, a woman looked at her ballot and exclaimed loudly "Why isn't David Cameron on here!?" and the person told her that she could only vote for local candidates... she didn't even know what party Cameron was in, but the guy said Conservatives so she voted for them... firstly I bet she couldn't tell me a single Conservative policy, and had probably never seen the Tory candidate for our constituency. In all honesty, it made me think "Why can she vote when I can't?" (I'm under eighteen).

      Since that happened, I've strongly advocated a basic, compulsory GCSE course making sure that people at least know what they're voting for. Otherwise, how is it even valid? You can't say that that woman's vote should have had equal weighting with an informed decision, can you?
      I would argue that every citizen of sound mind, who is not currently serving a criminal conviction, is not currently permanently residing abroad and is aged 18 or over on election day has the right to a vote which has equal weighting within their constituency. Regardless of how ill informed the woman is, she has a right to vote and for her vote to be counted with the same validity as anyone else in her constituency.

      Though, I do think she is a complete and utter idiot, yes.

      In response to the OP

      I think politics should be taught at GCSE level, yes. Not the ideologies of each party, though invariably that will make itself apparent in the way some teachers teach the lesson. Just teaching the way the system works, etc. We really should be more informed about such matters, though I do wonder - are these issues covered in citizenship classes? I think they might be...
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      I just have to say, that I found your discussion very funny coming from a country were it is compulsary. (As religious education is.) Unfortunately we only had it for one year (You could take it as an option in the final two years of grammar school, too). The majority would have mind to have more than one hour a year. (Anyway you learn about politics and constitution in history, too. Again a compulsory subject, as religious education(or ethics for atheists and non-christians), for the whole time you spend in secondary education.)
      Why you think it don't work? It worked and was quite interesting. (Okay I am biased.) It worked as good as religious education. I mean, honestly, tell me a subject everybody is interested in. Education isn't only defined by yur personal interest.
      I have to admit that my school had a lot of kids from well-situated,educated and "stable" background, but it is definitely not a question of money and not because it was a grammer school.
      Okay, I state I've never been to Great Britain, but I just wondered why you are so convinced that pupils will behave in another way then when attending a math lesson?
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      (Original post by ilickbatteries)
      I would argue that every citizen of sound mind, who is not currently serving a criminal conviction, is not currently permanently residing abroad and is aged 18 or over on election day has the right to a vote which has equal weighting within their constituency. Regardless of how ill informed the woman is, she has a right to vote and for her vote to be counted with the same validity as anyone else in her constituency.

      Though, I do think she is a complete and utter idiot, yes.
      I'm not saying I would not allow the woman to vote. But at the same time, it seems ludicrous that her opinion counts equally with a university professor, for example, doesn't it? Stopping people from voting is a slippery slope. I simply believe that people like her could be minimalised/improved by a bit of relevant education.
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      (Original post by JoeLatics)
      PSHE?
      I remember that! :rofl:

      half hour each week from year 7 to 9, ah those were the days, learning 'grown-up' stuff :rolleyes:
     
     
     
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