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    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    Read that back to yourself and see if it makes sense.

    A med degree is 5 years, at the end of 5 years you graduate become a fraction of the 100 percent employment rate
    No - what they meant was this is the first year that there are more medical students than foundation year one posts - so it won't be 100% this year.
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    (Original post by Organ)
    No - what they meant was this is the first year that there are more medical students than foundation year one posts - so it won't be 100% this year.
    more first years? or 5th years
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    Everyone seems to believe that they will be getting charged 9k tuition fees, but the fact of the matter is the only two universities that can safely charge this is Cambridge and Oxford.

    If you're going there, go on, have a moan and whine, then realise that you want to go to two of the most competetive universities in Europe, if not the world. Yes, knowledge is something that separates everyone, but sometimes it isn't enough. If you're going to an ex-poly like myself then stop thinking you're going to be racking up 50k of debt, you won't be.

    And lest we not forget who imposed student fees in the first place, or are most people typical ignorant students who say "Well there should be fees, just not raised fees," because if that's the case then do me a favour and jog on with your double standards.
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    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    more first years? or 5th years
    You are the one mentioning first years, they said...

    This is the first year medical students will graduate without a guaranteed job prospect.
    There are more 5th (or 6th at certain schools) years nationwide (particularly in Scotland I believe) than there are available FY1 posts - this will continue as the number of med students isn't going to decrease. The days of a guranteed job as a medical student have gone.

    (Original post by ShakeyJJ)
    And lest we not forget who imposed student fees in the first place, or are most people typical ignorant students who say "Well there should be fees, just not raised fees," because if that's the case then do me a favour and jog on with your double standards.
    But that was a completely different system - Labour's fees topped up the government teaching grants - giving universities more money to invest. The new system removes teaching grants (apart from Science, engineering, medicine and maths, nursing) and replaces the funding with students paying higher fees.
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    (Original post by Organ)
    But that was a completely different system - Labour's fees topped up the government teaching grants - giving universities more money to invest. The new system removes teaching grants (apart from Science, engineering, medicine and maths, nursing) and replaces the funding with students paying higher fees.
    That is because higher education is a privilege not a birth right, and anyone who believes differently should visit countries with no university system whatsoever. The money has to come from somewhere and, perhaps just in my eyes, it makes perfect sense for it to come from the students who want the education. I wouldn't even think of applying to Oxbridge after these tuition fees are raised (and also partly due to my intelligence being nowhere near the standard necessary for such places!) simply because of the fact that I know I couldn't afford it. There will still be universities offering 3k tuition fees and grants for those who excel in their exams, but many people are too lazy to bother working towards these exams and would rather be on the streets throwing fire extinguishers from rooftops at police officers.

    I'm sorry but I really don't agree with it, I understood the protesting to begin with but when it turned to rioting I feel the need to be part of the minority, there are just too many uninformed people out there protesting for the hell of it.
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    Can someone answer this question if out of choice I want to pay my tuition fees upfront will I be able to? because it says:

    'Tuition fees will not be paid upfront by either students or their parents. Graduates will make a contribution after they have left university'

    But surely if you want to they cannot stop you!
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    (Original post by Haychee)
    Do you have a better suggestion?
    Yes - fund education the same way as the rest of Europe and the same way we fund pensions, healthcare and other merit goods.
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    (Original post by aeonflux)
    No, don't think I will help spread government propaganda thanks. The 'facts' are that in future students will graduate with debts including approaching £50k. The fact is that they will pay interest on these debts at similar rates to mortgages. The fact is that a significant proportion will not pay these debts off within their lifetime.

    The fact is that no matter how you dress it up £50k is a huge amount of money - and by telling people 'its just student debt, don't worry about it' you are ironically encouraging exactly the same sort of 'buy now, pay later' attitude that started the recession in the first place.
    While I don't agree with the fee increase and teaching cuts, all debts are written off after 30 years.
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    (Original post by ShakeyJJ)
    Everyone seems to believe that they will be getting charged 9k tuition fees, but the fact of the matter is the only two universities that can safely charge this is Cambridge and Oxford.
    This is quite simply nonsense. Imperial College, my university have already indicated they will want to charge the full 9k, and the other top London universities (LSE, UCL, probably Kings) will undoubtedly charge the full 9k too. I would also expect the Russell Group in its entirety to want to charge the increased fees as well as other prominent research unis such as Durham and St Andrews.
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    (Original post by Haychee)
    Circulate this!

    http://www.factsonfees.com/
    Man that website is so biased, not even one negative point about it.
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    (Original post by jaggedspike)
    While I don't agree with the fee increase and teaching cuts, all debts are written off after 30 years.
    30 years is a long time to be paying back university debt - how is this any different from a graduate tax at 9%?

    This proposal is ideological and geared at forcing young people into a cycle of debt - student loan, overdrafts, credit cards, than enormous mortgages to get on the property ladder.
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    (Original post by aeonflux)
    This is quite simply nonsense. Imperial College, my university have already indicated they will want to charge the full 9k, and the other top London universities (LSE, UCL, probably Kings) will undoubtedly charge the full 9k too. I would also expect the Russell Group in its entirety to want to charge the increased fees as well as other prominent research unis such as Durham and St Andrews.
    And how long do you think these particular universities will honestly be able to survive charging the maximum? I'd give it 3 years before they realise that people are opting to go to cheaper universities through financial reasons, then the price drops down again. Competetive pricing will become a large part of the university recruitment process but it's the most likely outcome based on the fee increase.
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    (Original post by nicolaangel)
    Not if you're doing a medical degree.I'm guessing medical degrees will be £9000 because they are the most expensive degrees and most people will not be deterred by the money because of the nature of medicine.

    Accounting for the fact that NHS bursaries may no longer pay for your last year, the debt just including fees and accommodation (estimated £4000 a year) for a 5 year course would be £65000 for a five year course and £78000 for 6 years.

    :mad:
    And that's without interest.
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    (Original post by ShakeyJJ)
    And how long do you think these particular universities will honestly be able to survive charging the maximum? I'd give it 3 years before they realise that people are opting to go to cheaper universities through financial reasons, then the price drops down again. Competetive pricing will become a large part of the university recruitment process but it's the most likely outcome based on the fee increase.

    Unlikely, people don't choose courses and universities based on how much they want to pay, this isn't America. Most universities will be at £6K and I think it depends more on the course than where you study.
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    (Original post by s_libra)
    Can someone answer this question if out of choice I want to pay my tuition fees upfront will I be able to? because it says:

    'Tuition fees will not be paid upfront by either students or their parents. Graduates will make a contribution after they have left university'

    But surely if you want to they cannot stop you!
    You can if you want to, they can't force you to take out a loan. I paid for my first year's fees upfront. I regret it though, because a student loan is the best kind of loan you can ever have, and that £3000 would be a lot more useful to me now when I'm a student and have no income than when I'm a graduate earning a good salary. At which point, all I've avoided by paying upfront is paying that small installment a little while longer.

    So yeah, you can, but it's not a good idea.
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    (Original post by jaggedspike)
    Unlikely, people don't choose courses and universities based on how much they want to pay, this isn't America. Most universities will be at £6K and I think it depends more on the course than where you study.
    Of course at the moment people don't choose courses based on how much they will have to pay, but after the fee increase it will slowly change over time from 'which university is best for me' to 'which university can i afford?'

    At this point the universities opting to charge the maximum will have to hope that they can survive on the better-off students wanting to go to them, otherwise the fees will decrease again.
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    (Original post by Azimuth)
    You can if you want to, they can't force you to take out a loan. I paid for my first year's fees upfront. I regret it though, because a student loan is the best kind of loan you can ever have, and that £3000 would be a lot more useful to me now when I'm a student and have no income than when I'm a graduate earning a good salary. At which point, all I've avoided by paying upfront is paying that small installment a little while longer.

    So yeah, you can, but it's not a good idea.
    I paid mine upfront as well, I was thinking that in my final year I would take out the loan but not too sure know. This whole paying it back for the next 30 years, it won't affect those currently at uni right?
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    (Original post by ShakeyJJ)
    And how long do you think these particular universities will honestly be able to survive charging the maximum? I'd give it 3 years before they realise that people are opting to go to cheaper universities through financial reasons, then the price drops down again. Competetive pricing will become a large part of the university recruitment process but it's the most likely outcome based on the fee increase.
    They'll have no problem - again, using ICL as an example - 33% of our students are overseas and already paying upwards of £30k a year. Plenty of people will be willing to pay, it just means that education is based on wealth and not merit.

    The real questions is, how will these universities not be able to survive without charging the maximum? I wouldn't have so much problem with increased fees if the teaching budget wasn't being cut at the same time. These government proposals are forcing universities to charge the maximum just to have the same funds they had before.
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    (Original post by s_libra)
    Can someone answer this question if out of choice I want to pay my tuition fees upfront will I be able to? because it says:

    'Tuition fees will not be paid upfront by either students or their parents. Graduates will make a contribution after they have left university'

    But surely if you want to they cannot stop you!
    Yes you can.
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    (Original post by s_libra)
    I paid mine upfront as well, I was thinking that in my final year I would take out the loan but not too sure know. This whole paying it back for the next 30 years, it won't affect those currently at uni right?
    If you're currently at uni you're on the old system, so you repay 9% of your income over £15k, it gets wiped over 25 years. You can pay more than 9% (ie make additional payments) whenever you want, with no early repayment fees.
 
 
 
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