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Which universities will charge above £6000? Watch

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    (Original post by danny111)
    Administration, electricity and other maintenance cost, building cost (rent, does your uni own all its buildings, improving buildings) scholarships and bursaries for poorer students, IT, and so on.
    IMO people are gonna start asking a lot more questions when it's their own money rather than the taxpayers s'all I'm sayin.
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    Right, can someone answer this question for me since i'm still confused,
    If I am applying this year, will I have to pay the extra tuition fees for the 2nd and 3rd years?
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    (Original post by Joinedup)
    IMO people are gonna start asking a lot more questions when it's their own money rather than the taxpayers s'all I'm sayin.
    Oh, I agree with that.
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    As Vince Cable said, all of them eventually.
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    Goldsmiths will
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    This is by no means clear.

    Oxford will go ballistic if it is not allowed to charge more than £6000, yet it has the most daunting issues to widen access. If Oxford is given "soft" access conditions to meet, other universities will be extremely annoyed and may litigate if they are given tougher access conditions than Oxford in order to charge more than £6000.

    The inner city former polys (or at least the ones without governance issues) which will easily meet all diversity targets such as Birmingham City and University of West of England will be able to charge more than £6000 but may not want to do so, particularly if charging more than £6000 puts a university under a duty to give much higher bursaries to very poor students. As these universities have many more poor students, the cost of exceeding £6000 may not be worth it.

    If the access conditions are tough, a lot of Russell Group VCs who were expecting to charge £9000 may find that they can''t. I think a lot of VCs are expecting easy access conditions but I am not sure that the government, conservative as well as liberal, will agree. I think a lot of government ministers think that universities have sat back, stopped interviewing and let the rising A level points schools do their selecting for them and that has narrowed the social intake to a few elite schools.
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    (Original post by Xannny)
    I think higher ranked uni's will not think twice about charging the £9000 fee.

    The rest will be at £6000 a good opportunity to get people to go to them.
    sheesh thats so low! Must be nice. The most expensive school in the US, roughly converted into Euro's, is 49,000. Average would be 26,500, and cheepest is about 10,000 Euros (not a good uni though). If I decide to stay in the US for Uni I will be facing 160,000 Euros of debt. Even with the international fees being incredibly inflated, they were below the average of those in the US, which is why I am looking into schools there. You are all very lucky for the system you have over there!!

    (Even despite these high prices the vast majority of people go to University, so I really don't think the rise in prices is going to turn many away from getting a University education)

    this is all per year, to the best of my knowledge the British system works that way also.
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    A lot of the Northern Universities have already discussed the matter as a whole and to my knowledge most if not all will charge £9k.

    The less popular ones will need to charge it in order to cover losses and the more 'prestigious' will charge it as to not lose face (as well as other reasons, obviously).
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    A lot of the Northern Universities have already discussed the matter as a whole and to my knowledge most if not all will charge £9k.

    The less popular ones will need to charge it in order to cover losses and the more 'prestigious' will charge it as to not lose face (as well as other reasons, obviously).
    This isn't in the universities gift.

    As Vince said "In exceptional cases, universities will be able to charge higher contributions, up to a limit of £9,000, subject to meeting much tougher conditions on widening participation and fair access. "
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    This isn't in the universities gift.

    As Vince said "In exceptional cases, universities will be able to charge higher contributions, up to a limit of £9,000, subject to meeting much tougher conditions on widening participation and fair access. "
    Your point is?
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    Your point is?
    Most of the posters are acting in the belief that universities have a free choice in whether to charge up to £9000. The explanations that are being given as to why most, if not all, universities will charge £9000 are logical if universities are freely able to charge £9000.

    It is not surprising that posters on TSR are making these comments because so are Vice Chancellors.

    However, Cable has said that the ability to charge more than £6000 is going to be "exceptional" and linked to widening access. If that is a sop and all universities satisfy those criteria, every university will be "exceptional" and all, or most, will charge £9000.

    At the moment it is no means certain that this is a sop. If Cable and Willetts mean what they say (and widening access is big in Tory as well as Liberal circles-Cameron knows that working class access to elite institutions has declined under Labour and since he was at university) a number of VCs are going to find that when they want to charge £9000, they can't. Alternatively, they will find that the cost of charging £9000 is too high and the university will be better off charging £6000 with fewer strings.

    There is a very strong belief in Tory circles that university administration is monumentally inefficient and the last thing the Conservatives want to do is to give them a secure income source to reinforce that inefficiency.
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    Personally I think universities asking for ABB+ will ask for £7k+ So all the ones worth going to are going to be pretty expensive. 5 or 6k would be better and pretty reasonable when you think about it. Right now it's a total bargain and I can see how they could use more funding
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    All unis will charge £9k because they don't want to be seen as inferior and they need the money. I'm sure they can get around the access provisions with a few token bursaries to poor students. A difference of £3k per student is a huge incentive to do anything to be able to charge the higher fee. The "expectional" provision is a political device to pass the blame for higher fees from the government to the unis.

    There are now far more applicants than places so the higher fees is no deterent to people wanting to go to uni.
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    (Original post by Ryanli1993)
    Right, can someone answer this question for me since i'm still confused,
    If I am applying this year, will I have to pay the extra tuition fees for the 2nd and 3rd years?
    No, jeez.
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    isnt the minimum still 3,000 but unis have the choice tp charge more. I bet Oxbridge and Imperial will charge more than 6,000. They dont need to think twice about it.
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    They will all start to quickly charge as much as they can get away with.
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    All will charge £9000 except those way down the rankings table.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-11483638

    However, some universities may be able to charge fees high enough to enable them to increase their funding despite the budget cuts.

    The Higher Education Policy Institute has predicted that almost all universities will charge fees of £9,000 - not just a few.

    The knock-on effect of this, it says, will be that it costs the government more than it has predicted to subsidised the loans - which may result in further fee or interest rate rises.
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    (Original post by Allie-23)
    sheesh thats so low! Must be nice. The most expensive school in the US, roughly converted into Euro's, is 49,000. Average would be 26,500, and cheepest is about 10,000 Euros (not a good uni though). If I decide to stay in the US for Uni I will be facing 160,000 Euros of debt. Even with the international fees being incredibly inflated, they were below the average of those in the US, which is why I am looking into schools there. You are all very lucky for the system you have over there!!

    (Even despite these high prices the vast majority of people go to University, so I really don't think the rise in prices is going to turn many away from getting a University education)

    this is all per year, to the best of my knowledge the British system works that way also.
    Except you are missing one huge thing.
    The expensive American universities are private.
    All (but 2) british ones are public.
    If you compare our public unis to the american public ones, then ours will be more expensive.
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    what about FEE hike for International students
    any idea
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    Stupid cuts are going to make all the uni's charge over £6000, and most likely all of them are going for the £9000 a year to cover their loss in funding to the research departments. All the more reason why this year is going to be a massive scramble for uni places especially mature students I think there's going to be a record high.
 
 
 
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