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    It's so obvious, you mus've given off the impression you were going to put manchester as insurance, the admissions officer doing the correct thing wants themselves to be in a position of interest. Giving you a high offer means you'll have to make a decision whether you want to put it as your firm or not. In a way it's more of a chance of them getting you on the course.
    Sorry if it didn't work out too well for you.
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    (Original post by Casshern1456)
    It's so obvious, you mus've given off the impression you were going to put manchester as insurance, the admissions officer doing the correct thing wants themselves to be in a position of interest. Giving you a high offer means you'll have to make a decision whether you want to put it as your firm or not. In a way it's more of a chance of them getting you on the course.
    Sorry if it didn't work out too well for you.
    I quote myself from my interview- 'I couldn't imagine studying anywhere else'. Of course I wouldn't have gone into my interview acting like I didn't care about the uni. I really bigged up Manchester and the course That's why I'm so confused!
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    Hmmmm I'm not sure. I was given lower than standard offers for two of my offers. What type of school do you go to? I think my offers were lower because my school sucked...
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Because its an easy subject.
    ... Arabic is an easy subject? :eek:
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    (Original post by neutralmilkhotel)
    ... Arabic is an easy subject? :eek:
    Its not exactly science.
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Its not exactly science.
    It can be just as hard. Just because a subject is different, doesn't make it easier.
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    (Original post by Bakes0011)
    It can be just as hard. Just because a subject is different, doesn't make it easier.
    Astrophysics vs Arabic.
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    Does it say on their website they want ABB-BBC?

    Manchester are quite notorious in letting in people who dont get their offer.
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Its not exactly science.
    I'm sorry, I didn't realise that because a subject isn't "exactly science", this automatically means that it isn't difficult :confused:
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Because its an easy subject.
    So far from the truth....

    Have you tried learning Arabic?

    Fine girl in your sig btw. who is she?
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    (Original post by adam0311)
    So far from the truth....

    Have you tried learning Arabic?

    Fine girl in your sig btw. who is she?
    Im not a terrorist so no.
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Im not a terrorist so no.
    And what course are you going for?
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    (Original post by adam0311)
    And what course are you going for?
    engerlish
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Because its an easy subject.
    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Its not exactly science.
    Let me remind you that you've applied for a foundation in Computer Science, you aren't too academic yourself to be honest.
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    (Original post by lechaton-x)
    I quote myself from my interview- 'I couldn't imagine studying anywhere else'. Of course I wouldn't have gone into my interview acting like I didn't care about the uni. I really bigged up Manchester and the course That's why I'm so confused!
    That might be the problem - they want you to firm them, so they gave you a high offer as most people choose in grade order.

    In this situation it might be worth emailing to ask, but you have to decide whether it's better to shut up and choose as insurance anyway.
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    engerlish
    Foundation in CS, eyy?

    Need me to predict the dead end career?
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    (Original post by adam0311)
    Foundation in CS, eyy?

    Need me to predict the dead end career?



    he computer industry faces a skills crisis, the president of the British Computer Society has told BBC News.

    Unless steps are taken now, there will not be enough qualified graduates to meet the demands of UK industry, warned Professor Nigel Shadbolt.

    Prof Shadbolt said there was increasing demand but decreasing supply of graduates in computer science.
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/6155998.stm

    (2006)

    Another Source for high demand

    WHAT ARE THE CAREER PROSPECTS FOR A COMPUTER SCIENCE GRADUATE?
    According to recent figures there will be over 185,000 new jobs created in the UK alone over the next 5 years so career prospects are very good for computer science experts worldwide. A career in computing can also be fulfilling both personally and financially - figures from the 2007 QS World MBA Tour show that 18% of the world's MBA graduates have an IT background so the options to break into business, start up one's own company or other options are almost limitless. Salaries can be high. There are excellent career prospects within computer systems hardware, computer networking, software development or Internet technology and many computer science graduates branch out into different vocations such as bioscience, medicine or journalism.

    The range of companies a computer expert works for is almost limitless software developers, banks, car manufacturers, newspapers, universities. There are also a large number of courses available, not all of which will be suitable for your interests. Think hard about what those interests are and computer science could provide you with a long and rewarding career.
    http://www.topuniversities.com/artic...mputer-science



    http://blogs.payscale.com/ask_dr_sal...or-comput.html
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    -Your first article is outdated.

    -Your second article talks about close to 100 percent employment from Carnegie Mellon, so I wouldn't expect anything less. If you continued reading past the first paragraph, you would've seen that Illinois was only able to get 40% of grads into IT manufactures, with the rest doing in-house IT. I hope you know that in-house IT is the second to HR in lowest corporate demand. This brings me to my next point. In-house IT is a dead end career. The highest you are going to get is CIO. Which doesn't pay significantly high. Few people will reach this; you can't do much past this. Your avg in-house IT guy is going to cap out at around 125k--nothing to write home about after 20 yrs of work. This is the US market which is completely different than the UK market (which is worse).

    -Keep in mind what my original statement was--CS is a dead end career. Dead end doesn't mean no salary. Just means you aren't going super far. So no idea why you are posting salaries. A better strategy for your response would have been career progression.

    -According to the latest data from the U.K.'s Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), computer science graduates in the United Kingdom now have the hardest time finding work of graduates in any subject, with an unemployment rate of 17 percent. (btw my source is 2010, not 4 yrs old)
    http://www.infoworld.com/d/developer...-workforce-309
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    (Original post by adam0311)
    -Your first article is outdated.

    -Your second article talks about close to 100 percent employment from Carnegie Mellon, so I wouldn't expect anything less. If you continued reading past the first paragraph, you would've seen that Illinois was only able to get 40% of grads into IT manufactures, with the rest doing in-house IT. I hope you know that in-house IT is the second to HR in lowest corporate demand. This brings me to my next point. In-house IT is a dead end career. The highest you are going to get is CIO. Which doesn't pay significantly high. Few people will reach this; you can't do much past this. Your avg in-house IT guy is going to cap out at around 125k--nothing to write home about after 20 yrs of work. This is the US market which is completely different than the UK market (which is worse).

    -Keep in mind what my original statement was--CS is a dead end career. Dead end doesn't mean no salary. Just means you aren't going super far. So no idea why you are posting salaries. A better strategy for your response would have been career progression.

    -According to the latest data from the U.K.'s Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), computer science graduates in the United Kingdom now have the hardest time finding work of graduates in any subject, with an unemployment rate of 17 percent. (btw my source is 2010, not 4 yrs old)
    http://www.infoworld.com/d/developer...-workforce-309
    Good job Im doing CS+Maths
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    (Original post by Oh my Ms. Coffey)
    Good job Im doing CS+Maths
    Unless you plan on going IB, don't see that being much of a difference. I imagine you still are going to go CS, in which case +math isn't going to do anything. If you read the article I posted, or any of the ones you posted--it said the biggest problem within CS is that people are overqualified and firms are willing to take self-taught programmers.

    Do yourself a favor and go engineering.
 
 
 
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