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Do you agree with the Coalition Tuition Fees policy? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Do you agree with the Coalition Tuition Fees policy?
    Yes
    63
    50.81%
    No
    61
    49.19%

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    (Original post by BADBOY89)
    Education is a right, mate, not a privilege.

    So obviously no, those fee plans are garbage.
    It's a qualified privilege to go to University. If you drop out of school at age 15 and have no qualifications, you will most likely not go to university. However, anyone who meets the academic qualifications to go to university should be able to go regardless of income. I believe this plan meets this requirement even better than the current tuition fees system.

    Frankly, on a student forum for the vote to be this close, the government's message must be somewhat getting through.
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    No.

    Helps nobody.
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    (Original post by BADBOY89)
    What about the poorer families? They won't be able to send their children to uni, just because some bunch of dirty coalitioners decided to spend less on education than before which therefore leads to cuts in this sector.
    The new policy is better for the poorest 20% of this country...


    (Original post by BADBOY89)
    I am on a tight budget and with this stagnation, I can hardly find a job in the UK as I am a foreign student. And I wana go for an MA after finishing my BA. And I need a job and need one quickly.
    Well if you can't find a job and therefore have no income, you won't pay anything until you start earning over £21,000. So the fact that you are "on a tight budget" has nothing to do with you going to University.
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    (Original post by Mr XcX)
    Helps nobody.
    ...apart from the poorest 20% and the taypayer (by reducing Britain's deficit)?
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    I don't agree with it, neither do I think it's an attack by evil Tories on the right of students to receive higher education.
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    (Original post by BADBOY89)
    Well if u come out of a celebrity family or of an upper-middle class family with high incomes, it is good for you.

    What about the poorer families? They won't be able to send their children to uni, just because some bunch of dirty coalitioners decided to spend less on education than before which therefore leads to cuts in this sector.

    I am on a tight budget and with this stagnation, I can hardly find a job in the UK as I am a foreign student. And I wana go for an MA after finishing my BA. And I need a job and need one quickly.
    Foreign student fees are not increasing as far as I can tell.

    Poor families can afford to send students to university because they pay absolutely nothing upfront. They also get a year to two years fees paid by the government for them. There is also an increase to the maintenance grant for poorest students.

    Upper class and celebrity families who are privately educated and go to Oxford etc will not only be paying the higher rate of 9,000 pounds, they will have to pay more back afterwards as their income level is likely to be higher.

    How can you even have an opposing opinion when you're so entirely wrong about the policy?
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    I wont be affected by the fee increase, however I completely disagree with it.
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    It might not be a nice change but I understand why they are doing it and for this reason I support it. The main issue at the moment is that people are misinformed because there are so many variations about what is really going on.
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    I wouldnt wanna go to uni only the job i want requires a degree, its stupid the government speccially clegg went back on his promise ****!, Why can't they just leave it. I believe they should find another way to save money then cuttting education...o well they'll get whats coming to em we're the future voters mwah
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    For the most part, yes.
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    i visited a friend at UCL the other week. we walked past the library and there were a bunch of students with a sign "education is a right not a privilege". what a load of rubbish.

    (working on the assumption that those undergraduates were referring to a university education)
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    (Original post by BADBOY89)
    Education is a right, mate, not a privilege
    I'm genuinely interested in understanding this point so can you please no take the following as an offensive but more as a mature debate?

    Surely the extent to which education is a right is limited. Otherwise, being tutored by Lord Alan Sugar on how to run a business or by Bill Gates on how to repair a computer is a right too? Of course, this is an exaggeration, but I'm just trying to prove that there is a limit, and where this limit lies is subject to personal opinion.

    My personal opinion would be that the limit is after A-Levels. Although GCSEs are all you need to perform well in any job, A-Levels can give you some extra skills. University is concentrating on pretty much one subject and for most jobs makes no contribution to your skillset.

    Anyway, since anybody can afford to attend University, I think the 'rights' thing has been fulfilled?
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    (Original post by Lewroll)
    I wont be affected by the fee increase, however I completely disagree with it.
    Any chance you could explain why or...?
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    I don't support the coalitions policy on funding HE at all. Cutting HE at this time is incredibly short-sighted and that is the big problem. The fees hike at the moment isn't such a problem, just that we all know that it won't pay back so it'll be changed and probably eventually we'll end up with upfront fees, a much smaller HE sector with a very limited number of bursaries and a massive reinforcement of the class system.

    Great...
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    Ironically, asking this question on the student room doesn't actually give an accurate representation of student views; a poll at our school sixth form showed that, roughly speaking, 81% of our students were opposed to the newly introduced tuition fees policy.

    I think it all depends on who's answering methinks
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    I don't understand why people are so wound up over this. I'm hardly from a well privileged background myself, but I've had a couple of thoughts about this topic.

    For one thing, about half the people on my course at university don't put nearly enough effort into the degree itself to even deserve the degree, including myself. To be totally honest, there's far too many degrees that are quite frankly worthless (Golf Studies?) and students consistently ask for loans.

    I mean, look at it from the government's point of view. They need money, and thousands of students are walking into degrees that they fail or drop out of after one or two years anyway. A lot of the graduates that come out of some universities still aren't trained well and have the common sense of a dodo, and have been given free money from the government to complete their degree to give them a chance. Even then, they don't have to pay it back until they're up on their feet and earning more than 21 grand.

    It's ridiculous how good we have it here. Over in America, you pay upfront to get a decent education.

    I don't give a **** if I get negged for this, all of you media studies uni students from the London School of Imscaredtogointotheworkingworlds oimgoingtogotouni can all work hard after you've come out with 27 grand debt, because, well, that's life.

    There's probably a massive chance that I won't get a job after my degree either. Even if I do have £30 grand of debt, so what? I'll get a job. I know I'm competent enough. Do other students think that they won't get a job and they'll die a horrible death or something? You don't even have to pay it back if you're that incompetent at getting a job, do you?
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    I've noticed recently that no matter where a cut is made, it is always supposedly the wrong area to do it. Universities, aircraft carriers, winter fuel payments - you name it and I can guarantee that someone will protest. The fact is that if the Government decided to go along with the protesters no cuts would be made at all and the country would be even worse off.

    Cutting university funding is as good as anything, and as a result universities have no choice but to raise fees. If you don't agree with the rise then I invite you to suggest somewhere else which can afford to take the burden of £81 billion worth of cuts.
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    As a tax payer who has to get up at the crack every day in the freezing cold to pay the rent and bills while many students lie in bed till 3 in the afternoon with a hangover, I agree 100% with this policy and everyone I know feels the same. Why should the state fund what is a lifestyle choice for so many?
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    This has kind of surprised me. It seems like students - ones who don't consider themselves and are not whatsoever right-ring - are supporting this policy.

    (Original post by dededex)
    Ironically, asking this question on the student room doesn't actually give an accurate representation of student views; a poll at our school sixth form showed that, roughly speaking, 81% of our students were opposed to the newly introduced tuition fees policy.

    I think it all depends on who's answering methinks
    Well on here who's answering are University students in the main. Who's answering in your school, proportionally, are people who are going to have to be in a greater level of debt for this plan - even though it is a fair system with many measures to alleviate this. It's like polling small business owners and asking them if they'd like small business tax to go up, or polling taxpayers on the same issue. Of course a high proportion of small business owners will say it's a bad idea. This forum reflects student views and the poll is currently erring towards this policy being a good idea. They don't have an monetary interest in it - ideologically more so. And this is a truer reflection than your sixth form's poll.
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    If the money from the fees was going into the university budget, and not just replacing government subsidies, I'd probably agree with it.
 
 
 
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