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    (Original post by KingofSpades)
    first he would need to stop referring to himself in the third person, before one kicks his ass
    Actually I'm not talking about myself

    I'm simply proposing a scenario because I'm curious as to what exactly the process is.
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    You don't have to sit the SATs, but you do have to sit a high-school diploma equivalence test called the GED. On top of that you have to sit the MCAT, which is the medicine application test.

    On top of that, you need to have fulfilled various requirements with respect to which courses you have taken in your undergraduate degree. They'll want to see biology, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, some mathematics and some physics. They'll also require that you have done some non-science essay based courses, such as English, or philosophy.

    On top of that you need to be able to get a student visa.

    On top of that you'll need evidence to show that you can finance your studies. There is very little (read: none) financial support for foreign students. The vast majority of financial support is earmarked for in-state Americans. Then there's some for out-of-state Americans. There may be one or two scholarships for international students, I don't know. If there are they'll be extremely competitive.

    So yeah, it's tricky. This was enough to put me off the idea. Unless you have a lot of money it's almost impossible.

    If you're really committed to it, I'd recommend applying to study a masters at the American university you want to go to. While you're there attempt to get a green card (permanent residence). If you can get your hands on a green card and you live in the US, financial aid will be available to you, both in-state and out of state. That's going to make it a hell of a lot easier to pay for, and as you'll have done some prior study at an American university you'll not even really count as an international student.

    The tricky bit is paying for the masters and getting the green card. If you can get the masters and you're having trouble getting a green card, you can always impregnate someone (legally). Having a kid born on American soil (therefore, a child with American citizenship) automatically grants you residence.
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    (Original post by There will be Particles)
    0.7% is pretty good from my point of view.
    Firstly, how is a 0.7% chance of success considered good - evidence-based medicine will be wasted on you..!

    Secondly, if you're really interested in applying to US schools then email the ones you're interested in and get the accurate information you need - surely that's better than a load of conjecture from people on here..
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    (Original post by theatrical)
    Firstly, how is a 0.7% chance of success considered good - evidence-based medicine will be wasted on you..!
    0.7% of all applicants are international and 1.3% of all places given are for international students.

    These statistics can be considered as very good as 0.7% of 30,000 students is actually 210 which is excellent considering that we are talking about international students where each and every one would be expected to provide their own funding and to be highly successful academically.

    (Oh and you're meant to be a Doctor in training, why insult people personally?? Just for the record I'm doing pretty well academically and I don't think evidence based Medicine will be wasted on me )
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    (Original post by Taure)
    You don't have to sit the SATs, but you do have to sit a high-school diploma equivalence test called the GED. On top of that you have to sit the MCAT, which is the medicine application test.

    On top of that, you need to have fulfilled various requirements with respect to which courses you have taken in your undergraduate degree. They'll want to see biology, organic chemistry, inorganic chemistry, some mathematics and some physics. They'll also require that you have done some non-science essay based courses, such as English, or philosophy.

    On top of that you need to be able to get a student visa.

    On top of that you'll need evidence to show that you can finance your studies. There is very little (read: none) financial support for foreign students. The vast majority of financial support is earmarked for in-state Americans. Then there's some for out-of-state Americans. There may be one or two scholarships for international students, I don't know. If there are they'll be extremely competitive.

    So yeah, it's tricky. This was enough to put me off the idea. Unless you have a lot of money it's almost impossible.

    If you're really committed to it, I'd recommend applying to study a masters at the American university you want to go to. While you're there attempt to get a green card (permanent residence). If you can get your hands on a green card and you live in the US, financial aid will be available to you, both in-state and out of state. That's going to make it a hell of a lot easier to pay for, and as you'll have done some prior study at an American university you'll not even really count as an international student.

    The tricky bit is paying for the masters and getting the green card. If you can get the masters and you're having trouble getting a green card, you can always impregnate someone (legally). Having a kid born on American soil (therefore, a child with American citizenship) automatically grants you residence.
    This is a great answer thanks very much for the information
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    (Original post by There will be Particles)
    0.7% of all applicants are international and 1.3% of all places given are for international students.

    These statistics can be considered as very good as 0.7% of 30,000 students is actually 210 which is excellent considering that we are talking about international students where each and every one would be expected to provide their own funding and to be highly successful academically.

    (Oh and you're meant to be a Doctor in training, why insult people personally?? Just for the record I'm doing pretty well academically and I don't think evidence based Medicine will be wasted on me )
    Actually if you look at the most recent stats foreigners are underrepresented.

    https://www.aamc.org/download/152934..._data_2010.pdf

    1.5% of enrollment, but 4% of applicants. So foreign application to US medical school is definitely a bad idea, apart from the massive cost.
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    (Original post by thisismycatch22)
    Actually if you look at the most recent stats foreigners are underrepresented.

    https://www.aamc.org/download/152934..._data_2010.pdf

    1.5% of enrollment, but 4% of applicants. So foreign application to US medical school is definitely a bad idea, apart from the massive cost.
    Yeah I guess you're right, tbh I think I would prefer to stay in the UK for my future Medical degree.

    Thanks for the source btw, very informative.
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    I am a year 11 student and i was wondering what A-levels are needed/wanted to study medicine in the USA. Money is not an issue and I have an American passport, but was born and lived in the UK. Does anyone know what A levels i should do and also, could some one please explain the whole masters and premed course thing as it is rather confusing.

    Thank you
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    (Original post by AManuel)
    I am a year 11 student and i was wondering what A-levels are needed/wanted to study medicine in the USA. Money is not an issue and I have an American passport, but was born and lived in the UK. Does anyone know what A levels i should do and also, could some one please explain the whole masters and premed course thing as it is rather confusing.

    Thank you
    You'll need to do a bachelors degree in the US (premed) and then apply to medical school.
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    (Original post by Taure)
    Having a kid born on American soil (therefore, a child with American citizenship) automatically grants you residence.
    This is old but I just had to reply to this: not true. I'm American (born on American soil and all that), my parents are not and when their work visas expired when I was thirteen, we had to leave. True story.
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    (Original post by Kinkerz)
    You'll need to do a bachelors degree in the US (premed) and then apply to medical school.
    Thanks... Do I need to do Math A-Level or does it matter only what I want to do for a Bachelor degree?
 
 
 
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