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Why are maintenance loans partly based on parental income? Watch

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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    But changing the system to what you suggest will mean that students who have poorer parents will be at disadvantage, as rich parents will still pay for accommodation costs and the like. I realise that not all parents will, but in general they do.
    I think the current system is a decent compromise tbh.
    I think wealthier parents would be less likely to do this if their children were actually realistically ABLE to pay their own way through uni. A number of my friends (including myself actually) and/or their parents would have wanted their to pay their own way through uni... that's until they found out that they/their children aren't able to take out enough money in student loans to cover living costs. The FULL mainteance loan is barely enough to cover living costs, let alone 70% of it.


    (Original post by ily_em)
    Have you read the Browne report? They're changing it to a non means tested loan for that very reason (£3,750 if I remember correctly). There will still be bursaries though.

    edit:
    ...? How are we supposed to get by on £3,750 for an entire year?
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    I don't agree with the maintenace grant actually... I think if the government could rid of grants they would be more able to afford to give everyone fully repayable loans.

    Apart from that me and my parents would both agree on the bolded point actually... the problem is how do you moderate that?
    The thing is, if the grant wasn't there, many students, myself included in this, wouldn't be able to go to uni. My accommodation (I got the cheapest at the uni) eats my loan up and I get about £200 left over from that. It means I would have to get a job, which isn't a bad thing, except that I really don't have time. As from next year I'll be doing 3 languages, and already doing 2 my days involve my reasearch project, learning pages of vocab, homework (every day) and learning grammar. And it's fast paced, a subject like mine doesn't allow for a lot of work time :no:. My mum is a uni student herself and I am one of 5, and 3 of my siblings are still in compulsory education, so there is no way in a million years my parents could help me out with uni when we just have my dad's wage :no:. And this was WITH a year gap year earning money. Without, uni would simply be out of reach for people like me. There is a big difference between being under the glass roof, and putting yourself there i.e. your case where you want to reject any help from your parents.

    For your last part, well, you couldn't. Which is probably the exact reason it's not in place.
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    I think wealthier parents would be less likely to do this if their children were actually realistically ABLE to pay their own way through uni. A number of my friends (including myself actually) and/or their parents would have wanted their to pay their own way through uni... that's until they found out that they/their children aren't able to take out enough money in student loans to cover living costs. The FULL mainteance loan is barely enough to cover living costs, let alone 70% of it.
    I doubt it. As I said, I met so many people in my first year who were in the most expensive accommodation (over £120 a week) just because their parents were paying for it.

    I think the difference is that even if the parent / child would prefer to pay their own way through uni, if the student comes into financial trouble for whatever reason, the richer the parent, the more likely they are to be able to bail them out.

    I agree that everyone should have access to a loan that will cover all the living costs, but students from poorer areas should have access to a bit more on top. Perhaps have a system where the student has to specifically apply for the extra money, and each individual circumstance is looked at?
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    (Original post by innerhollow)
    I think wealthier parents would be less likely to do this if their children were actually realistically ABLE to pay their own way through uni. A number of my friends (including myself actually) and/or their parents would have wanted their to pay their own way through uni... that's until they found out that they/their children aren't able to take out enough money in student loans to cover living costs. The FULL mainteance loan is barely enough to cover living costs, let alone 70% of it.




    ...? How are we supposed to get by on £3,750 for an entire year?
    No idea :dontknow: Just pointing out that it's been changed. If your household income is below £60k then you'd get a grant too.

    Job and overdraft are the answer I guess.
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    (Original post by WelshBluebird)
    I doubt it. As I said, I met so many people in my first year who were in the most expensive accommodation (over £120 a week) just because their parents were paying for it.
    Well... I say let them have it. That accomodation is above and beyond what you actually need, and the money just goes into the university's pockets anyway. As long as everyone can afford appropriate accomodation, that's all we need.

    I think the difference is that even if the parent / child would prefer to pay their own way through uni, if the student comes into financial trouble for whatever reason, the richer the parent, the more likely they are to be able to bail them out.

    I agree that everyone should have access to a loan that will cover all the living costs, but students from poorer areas should have access to a bit more on top. Perhaps have a system where the student has to specifically apply for the extra money, and each individual circumstance is looked at?
    As long as that happens, I'm happy

    What sort of financial trouble are you referring to? If a student for example accrued a debt due to gambling why would it be the government's responsibility to bail them out?

    On another note, I think a lot of rich parents would bail their children but not all. For example it's quite possible my parents are going to cut me off financially if they find out I'm gay... so if there was a means-tested "extra money" scheme would hope there would be some exemption clauses... A case-by-case basis like you suggested could work, but people would do their best to take advantage of it.
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    (Original post by ily_em)
    No idea :dontknow: Just pointing out that it's been changed. If your household income is below £60k then you'd get a grant too.
    ... I don't think much has changed actually. If anything this current system even worse

    Job and overdraft are the answer I guess.
    I think SpiritedAway's post below shows why a job is not a feasible solution for everyone (also remember that at Oxbridge you're not even allowed to do a job alongside your degree IIRC)


    (Original post by SpiritedAway)
    The thing is, if the grant wasn't there, many students, myself included in this, wouldn't be able to go to uni. My accommodation (I got the cheapest at the uni) eats my loan up and I get about £200 left over from that. It means I would have to get a job, which isn't a bad thing, except that I really don't have time. As from next year I'll be doing 3 languages, and already doing 2 my days involve my reasearch project, learning pages of vocab, homework (every day) and learning grammar. And it's fast paced, a subject like mine doesn't allow for a lot of work time :no:. My mum is a uni student herself and I am one of 5, and 3 of my siblings are still in compulsory education, so there is no way in a million years my parents could help me out with uni when we just have my dad's wage :no:. And this was WITH a year gap year earning money. Without, uni would simply be out of reach for people like me.
    I'm applying for an engineering degree. TRUST ME, I understand fully when you say you don't want to work during uni

    However, I think you're not understanding that my entire proposal is that we extend loans to cover all living costs... No one expects you to live off a 4k/year mainteance loan.


    There is a big difference between being under the glass roof, and putting yourself there i.e. your case where you want to reject any help from your parents.
    I have less choice in the matter than I'm making out actually... if my parents find out about my sexuality they will probably cut me off financially... so this current student finance system puts me in a very risky position... but there's nothing I can really do about it
 
 
 
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