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    (Original post by Peel)
    Yeah it's perfectly possible, but right now you're just making assumptions - why not just ask the OP?
    Because that's nothing to do with what the OP asked, why wouldn't you assume that he's interested in engineering if he's asking this question. He told us he's interested.

    Smack should be asking him, not making the (rather odd) assumption that just because he's good at maths, he dosen't enjoy physics, problem solving, building things or understanding how things work.
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    (Original post by hello dave)
    Because that's nothing to do with what the OP asked, why wouldn't you assume that he's interested in engineering if he's asking this question. He told us he's interested.

    Smack should be asking him, not making the (rather odd) assumption that just because he's good at maths, he dosen't enjoy physics, problem solving, building things or understanding how things work.
    Question is whether he's more interested in Physics than Engineering if you re-read the initial post, and there's lots of things to suggest he might prefer Physics. Either way, this isn't my argument I just disagreed with you on that one line.
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    (Original post by hello dave)
    Because that's nothing to do with what the OP asked, why wouldn't you assume that he's interested in engineering if he's asking this question. He told us he's interested.

    Smack should be asking him, not making the (rather odd) assumption that just because he's good at maths, he dosen't enjoy physics, problem solving, building things or understanding how things work.
    No, I didn't assume that at all, that's a blatant lie.

    The OP has said that he loves maths, wants to do Step, and has asked about how much maths is in an engineering degree and what modules are most relevant. He's also been "amazed" at the amount of maths in a physics degree, and this "veered" towards a physics degree.

    Therefore I suggested that perhaps he might prefer to do a maths or physics degree. The above has given me the impression that he is primarily in it for the maths, and as someone who is doing an engineering degree and wants to become a professional engineer, I am saying that doing engineering because you "love maths" isn't really the best reason to do an engineering degree.

    I personally think that, due to the information presented so far, he'd prefer a maths or a physics degree. Probably physics due to the high mathematical content of the degree and the fact that it can also be applied (physicists are highly active in the development of renewable energy systems).

    You are not studying engineering, and people who are - and at top universities too, and people who are currently working as engineers, are telling you that you are wrong.
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    Well, well, well! What an entertaining argument.
    I thank everyone who has contributed. I do enjoy physics and do enjoy mathematics. Do I enjoy building and designing? I would say so. I am currently part of a building crew and volunteer as a STEM ambassador. So, I do a lot of hands on projects with primary school children. I have also attended the COSMOL physics workshop and familarising myself with the CD's. Do I want to do a Maths degree? Most defintely not!

    The reason why I enquired about Step is too stretch myself. I am not sure of a lot of things. What I am certain of is that I will like to work in the energy sector, particularly renewable energy. Interestingly, I attended a cambridge lecture where a PHD student spoke about his works on plasmons and solar cells. Lo and behold, he studied electrical engineering! Will I enjoy an Engineering degree? Maybe. I have looked at some university modules and it didnt set my heart on fire. Will I enjoy a physics degree? More than likely. There are not many lecturers like Walter Lewin. But, through my current BTECH course, I can see that I prefer doing problems on momentum than electricity. I also attended an energy lecture on fusion energy and felt like the early discoverers (rutherford, newton, dirac etc).

    I have also applied for an engineering trainee programme. Maybe that will be the clincher. Thanks everyone. Please feel free to comment on my post.
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    (Original post by aurao2003)
    Well, well, well! What an entertaining argument.
    I thank everyone who has contributed. I do enjoy physics and do enjoy mathematics. Do I enjoy building and designing? I would say so. I am currently part of a building crew and volunteer as a STEM ambassador. So, I do a lot of hands on projects with primary school children. I have also attended the COSMOL physics workshop and familarising myself with the CD's. Do I want to do a Maths degree? Most defintely not!

    The reason why I enquired about Step is too stretch myself. I am not sure of a lot of things. What I am certain of is that I will like to work in the energy sector, particularly renewable energy. Interestingly, I attended a cambridge lecture where a PHD student spoke about his works on plasmons and solar cells. Lo and behold, he studied electrical engineering! Will I enjoy an Engineering degree? Maybe. I have looked at some university modules and it didnt set my heart on fire. Will I enjoy a physics degree? More than likely. There are not many lecturers like Walter Lewin. But, through my current BTECH course, I can see that I prefer doing problems on momentum than electricity. I also attended an energy lecture on fusion energy and felt like the early discoverers (rutherford, newton, dirac etc).

    I have also applied for an engineering trainee programme. Maybe that will be the clincher. Thanks everyone. Please feel free to comment on my post.
    Okay, maths is out of the question.

    What modules in the engineering degree didn't you like the sound of? Modules can vary a lot more university to university, so you might have just been looking at one that had a particularly high amount of modules that you'd find boring.

    From this, I'd probably have to recommend studying a physics degree, as this'll still allow you to work in energy and the development of renewable energy systems.
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    Modules to do with Analogue electronics. It has never been an area of interest. In fact, when I receive my IEEE and IET magazines, they are the last to be read or generally unread. You can guess I read the energy and power sections first. Then sustainability.
 
 
 
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