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If Shakespeare or Van Gogh didn't exist, would the world be worse off? Watch

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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    They're not that important. When you consider only a minority of people actually speak English it renders Shakespeare's works useless for most people and even then only a tiny minority of English speakers know his works in detail. Van Gogh painted things, so what? I can google image "sunflowers" and see far superior images of sunflowers than the ones he conjured up.
    Just a point, but millions and millions of people worldwide speak English, and Shakespeare has been translated into hundreds of languages anyway :rolleyes:

    You are clearly either a troll or a complete philistine, so I'm going to leave before this just turns into a spammy argument. You had obviously made up your mind before you started the thread, and have no intention of listening to anything that anybody says in disagreement, ie. you have no intention in engaging in a proper, well reasoned debate. Therefore you are not worth bothering about in future, and I will be leaving this thread without reading any further posts of yours.
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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    They're not that important. When you consider only a minority of people actually speak English it renders Shakespeare's works useless for most people and even then only a tiny minority of English speakers know his works in detail.
    :hmmm:

    You trollin?

    English is the most widely spoken second language in the world, is the language of science and has the world's third (last time I heard) biggest native speaker base.
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    Not in the real sense worse off. Our lives wouldn't be any worse.
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    (Original post by Johnny Christ)


    The one that got me was 'eyeball' :nooo:
    And 'good riddance' :eek:

    I found this the other day whilst doing research, quite fascinating, read if you care
    Spoiler:
    Show
    Many of the common expressions now thought to be clichés were Shakespeare's creations. Chances are you use Shakespeare's expressions all the time even though you may not know it is the Bard you are quoting. You may think that fact is "neither here nor there", but that's "the short and the long of it." Bernard Levin said it best in the following quote about Shakespeare's impact on our language:
    If you cannot understand my argument, and declare "It's Greek to me", you are quoting Shakespeare; if you claim to be more sinned against than sinning, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you recall your salad days, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you act more in sorrow than in anger, if your wish is father to the thought, if your lost property has vanished into thin air, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you have ever refused to budge an inch or suffered from green-eyed jealousy, if you have played fast and loose, if you have been tongue-tied, a tower of strength, hoodwinked or in a pickle, if you have knitted your brows, made a virtue of necessity, insisted on fair play, slept not one wink, stood on ceremony, danced attendance (on your lord and master), laughed yourself into stitches, had short shrift, cold comfort or too much of a good thing, if you have seen better days or lived in a fool's paradise - why, be that as it may, the more fool you, for it is a foregone conclusion that you are (as good luck would have it) quoting Shakespeare; if you think it is early days and clear out bag and baggage, if you think it is high time and that that is the long and short of it, if you believe that the game is up and that truth will out even if it involves your own flesh and blood, if you lie low till the crack of doom because you suspect foul play, if you have your teeth set on edge (at one fell swoop) without rhyme or reason, then - to give the devil his due - if the truth were known (for surely you have a tongue in your head) you are quoting Shakespeare; even if you bid me good riddance and send me packing, if you wish I were dead as a door-nail, if you think I am an eyesore, a laughing stock, the devil incarnate, a stony-hearted villain, bloody-minded or a blinking idiot, then - by Jove! O Lord! Tut, tut! for goodness' sake! what the dickens! but me no buts - it is all one to me, for you are quoting Shakespeare. (The Story of English, 145)
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    (Original post by Kaykiie)
    :hmmm:

    You trollin?

    English is the most widely spoken second language in the world, is the language of science and has the world's third (last time I heard) biggest native speaker base.
    It's spoken as a native language by 375m people worldwide and again, around 375m speak it as a secondary language. When you consider there's almost 7bn people worldwide, that's not much.
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    Wow obviously lots of Tsrians want to live in a world with no culture. I'm sure many of you wouldn't be reading half the stuff you enjoy if it wasn't for Shakespeare. He's influenced so many great writers.

    Van gogh can go though as I dislike him. Replace him with one of the great masters instead like da vinici or michelangelo
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    (Original post by happyfeet*)
    And 'good riddance' :eek:

    I found this the other day whilst doing research, quite fascinating, read if you care
    Spoiler:
    Show
    [COLOR="Purple"]Many of the common expressions now thought to be clichés were Shakespeare's creations. Chances are you use Shakespeare's expressions all the time even though you may not know it is the Bard you are quoting. You may think that fact is "neither here nor there", but that's "the short and the long of it." Bernard Levin said it best in the following quote about Shakespeare's impact on our language:
    If you cannot understand my argument, and declare "It's Greek to me", you are quoting Shakespeare; if you claim to be more sinned against than sinning, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you recall your salad days, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you act more in sorrow than in anger, if your wish is father to the thought, if your lost property has vanished into thin air, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you have ever refused to budge an inch or suffered from green-eyed jealousy, if you have played fast and loose, if you have been tongue-tied, a tower of strength, hoodwinked or in a pickle, if you have knitted your brows, made a virtue of necessity, insisted on fair play, slept not one wink, stood on ceremony, danced attendance (on your lord and master), laughed yourself into stitches, had short shrift, cold comfort or too much of a good thing, if you have seen better days or lived in a fool's paradise - why, be that as it may, the more fool you, for it is a foregone conclusion that you are (as good luck would have it) quoting Shakespeare; if you think it is early days and clear out bag and baggage, if you think it is high time and that that is the long and short of it, if you believe that the game is up and that truth will out even if it involves your own flesh and blood, if you lie low till the crack of doom because you suspect foul play, if you have your teeth set on edge (at one fell swoop) without rhyme or reason, then - to give the devil his due - if the truth were known (for surely you have a tongue in your head) you are quoting Shakespeare; even if you bid me good riddance and send me packing, if you wish I were dead as a door-nail, if you think I am an eyesore, a laughing stock, the devil incarnate, a stony-hearted villain, bloody-minded or a blinking idiot, then - by Jove! O Lord! Tut, tut! for goodness' sake! what the dickens! but me no buts - it is all one to me, for you are quoting Shakespeare. (The Story of English, 145)
    [/COLOR]
    :shock:
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    English lessons would be a hell of a lot easier without Shakespeare.
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    Creatively, they weren't original. They stole peoples ideas. As Picasso once said 'Good Artists Borrow, Great Artists Steal'

    Stealer's win apparently.
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    (Original post by Johnny Christ)
    :shock:
    :yep:
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    in terms of shakespeares contributions - we had a posted in our english classroom saying this:

    If you cannot understand my argument, and declare ``It's Greek to me'', you are quoting Shakespeare; if you claim to be more sinned against than sinning, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you recall your salad days, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you act more in sorrow than in anger; if your wish is farther to the thought; if your lost property has vanished into thin air, you are quoting Shakespeare; if you have ever refused to budge an inch or suffered from green-eyed jealousy, if you have played fast and loose, if you have been tongue-tied, a tower of strength, hoodwinked or in a pickle, if you have knitted your brows, made a virtue of necessity, insisted on fair play, slept not one wink, stood on ceremony, danced attendance (on your lord and master), laughed yourself into stitches, had short shrift, cold comfort or too much of a good thing, if you have seen better days or lived in a fool's paradise -why, be that as it may, the more fool you , for it is a foregone conclusion that you are (as good luck would have it) quoting Shakespeare; if you think it is early days and clear out bag and baggage, if you think it is high time and that that is the long and short of it, if you believe that the game is up and that truth will out even if it involves your own flesh and blood, if you lie low till the crack of doom because you suspect foul play, if you have your teeth set on edge (at one fell swoop) without rhyme or reason, then - to give the devil his due - if the truth were known (for surely you have a tongue in your head) you are quoting Shakespeare; even if you bid me good riddance and send me packing, if you wish I was dead as a door-nail, if you think I am an eyesore, a laughing stock, the devil incarnate, a stony-hearted villain, bloody-minded or a blinking idiot, then - by Jove! O Lord! Tut tut! For goodness' sake! What the dickens! But me no buts! - it is all one to me, for you are quoting Shakespeare.

    Bernard Levin
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    (Original post by Brutal Honesty)
    It's spoken as a native language by 375m people worldwide and again, around 375m speak it as a secondary language. When you consider there's almost 7bn people worldwide, that's not much.
    When you look at it in isolation then of course it doesn't seem like a lot. When you consider that it is the 'official' language of more countries than any other then... yeah..

    The fact is, you're wrong and you're probably trolling which means I've taken the bait. However, being an English Language student I do have a personal interest in the subject..
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    been to van Gogh museum 6 times. I cant see what the fuzz is about!! is painting wasn't interesting or captivating if you dont the his history (about is his French friend and that he cut his ear). the world wouldnt be any different if he lived or not (except he didnt lived there wouldnt be a museum in Amsterdan named after him).

    I like reading Shakespeare play, but hate seeing it performed on stage. again the world wouldnt be that much different.
 
 
 
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